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11

Summary: Rahab is widely praised for protecting the Hebrew spies, despite her betrayal of her countrymen, but opinion among both church fathers and modern commentators is divided with respect to her false report. Hiding the spies Church fathers such as Gregory of Elvira and Cassiodorus praise Rahab's protection of the spies and see in her an image of the ...


9

The 9th commandment (Ex 20:16) is about being a false witness (perjury) which implicates others to be judged guilty in a court setting. The commandment does not prohibit all types of lying. Being a false witness is a much more specific type of lying that is harmful to another person. It is especially pernicious because it causes an innocent person to ...


9

God didn't lie God knew that Pharaoh would say "no" to this request, and since we know the outcome of the story we can think that God intended for Israel to stay put all along and never intended them to journey into the wilderness. But the simple fact of the matter is we cannot assume that. We can assume that God did intend for the Israelites to go into the ...


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The consensus among Catholic and Protestant commentators is that the midwives did not sin by disobeying Pharaoh, but if they did lie to him, they sinned. Handling each point separately: Disobedience to Pharaoh Catholic commentator George Leo Haydock cites Acts 4 and Matthew 10:28 in reference to Pharaoh's command to kill the male Hebrew children, indicating ...


4

This might be the idea you're going for: James 2:10-11 ESV For whoever keeps the whole law and yet stumbles at just one point is guilty of breaking all of it. For he who said, “You shall not commit adultery,” also said, “You shall not murder.” If you do not commit adultery but do commit murder, you have become a lawbreaker. "...just one point..." being ...


4

In questioning whether it is ever right to lie, there are usually two distinct questions: What exactly is a lie? Is it necessary to always tell the whole truth, or can you withhold the truth if needed? Is it always wrong to lie, or is it permissible to lie to prevent a greater evil? The classically debated case of this would be when a Nazi soldier comes to ...


3

Finding God's approval for men's actions is uncommon. More often than not, the actions of people are recorded in all their embarrassing detail without an explicit endorsement or condemnation by God. I concur with the problematic comparison of humans to God, for God knows exactly who he is and what he should do, he is sovereign and sinless, and doesn't ...


2

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. The Eighth Commandment condemns lying. Because God is regarded as the author of all truth, the Church believes that humans are obligated to honor the truth. The most obvious way to fulfill this commandment is not to lie — intentionally deceive another by speaking a falsehood. So a good Catholic is who ...


2

As David Stratton states, Abraham was simply trying to not get killed. She was a beautiful woman, so another, more powerful man could simply kill him and take her as his wife. So to save himself Abraham simply said Sarah was his sister, which was a half truth. So the Pharaoh made Abraham rich by offering gifts, but when he was going to take Sarah as his ...


2

It is never morally acceptable to lie. But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death. [Revelation 21:8 KJV] Not just 'some liars' but 'all liars', will have their part in ...


1

St. Vincent Ferrer, following Gratian's Decretals (an early corpus iuris canonici, "body of canon law"), defended the notion of simulated authority. Philip Daileader, Saint Vincent Ferrer, His World and Life, p. 22: Vincent also cited the Decretum in defense of the cardinals who, rather than allowing themselves to be killed, had elected Urban [...


1

When is it morally acceptable to lie? My initial response to this question question was: It is complicated! I am not going to regurgitate the information posted in the excellent answers of Grateful Disciple, Andrew Shanks or Nigel J, but rather give a response with a twist. Many Christians believe that all lying is morally sinful. Even St. Thomas states this,...


1

The Hebrew midwives lied (Exodus 1:15-19) or should we rather say “lied” to or misled Pharaoh. For it they were blessed by God (Ex 1:20-21). Also, Rahab misled (Joshua 2:3-6). She “lied” because of her faith... according to the New Testament she is one of the heroines of faith in the Old Testament (Hebrews 11:31). In these cases there is no hint the “lies” ...


1

Rahab is commended in the New Testament more for her faith that God was going to enable his people to take the land and for her welcoming the spies into her home rather than for her act of lying. (James 2:25, Hebrews 11:31) In Joshua chapter 2, her motivation for lying was mainly out of self preservation- that of saving herself and her family from the ...


1

Truth is in the 'eye of the beholder'. What the other people thought about Abba Moses may not necessarily have portrayed him correctly. An alternative explanation is that Abba Moses had low thoughts about himself, according to the old saying: Mat 23:12 (NIV) "For those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted"....


1

Not to discount the self-survival aspect, there is more to it than just that - as his sister, the traditions etc. would dictate a negotiation for her. You can do a lot of stalling and burn tons of time in a negotiation if you're willing and able. Where this plan backfired was that Pharaoh took advantage of his rights as Pharaoh and skipped the negotiations ...


1

Here is one Protestant view which makes sense to me, and doesn't fudge the issue. The point is that no where in Scripture are the midwives condemned. The same is true of Rahab's actions in Joshua chapter 2. Here I am following the view of the Evangelical Protestant John Davis:- Not every untruth is the moral equivalent of a lie. All is fair in love and ...


1

As others correctly note, God knew in advance that Pharaoh would refuse the seemingly unimposing request that Moses presented to him; allow the people of Israel to journey three days into the wilderness to sacrifice to God. That Pharaoh refused is somewhat understandable. Like any tyrannical ruler he would assume that allowing an enslaved body of people to ...


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