16

The Joint Declaration on Justification The document that bishop Palmer is likely referring to is the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification, created in 1999 by the Lutheran World Federation and the Catholic Church and joined by the World Methodist Council in 2006 and the World Communion of Reformed Churches in 2017. The Anglican Communion also "...


15

This is a quick rundown, keeping in mind that not every individual parish fully subscribes to everything their parent organization does (don't judge a book by its cover, but be aware of the connotations each cover generally carries): Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) The Bible is inspired and inerrant, the Confessions are a clear and accurate ...


14

For most of a year following his trial at Worms in April 1521, Martin Luther was in seclusion. During this time his associates at Wittenberg were implementing practical changes in the church there. One of Luther's closest associates, Philip Melanchthon, was reluctant to move forward on some changes in fear that they might tend toward sin. If you are a ...


11

Is an English translation of the letter publicly available, and where can I find it? If you are talking about finding it online, you aren't going to have any luck. These letters, as far as I know, are not available to read online. However, if you are willing to spend some money, an English book compilation of the letters by George Mastrantonis can be ...


10

I generally write from a reformed perspective, but I don't think there's anything in this post that other Christians (Oriental Orthodox and Church of the East aside) would disagree with. The doctrine was first formulated clearly by the Council of Chalcedon: One and the same Son, the Self-same Perfect in Godhead, the Self-same Perfect in Manhood; truly God ...


9

Consubstantiation (also called impanation) says that, after consecration, bread remains and Christ becomes present within, among, or "along-side" the bread. Transubstantiation says no bread remains after consecration; the substance of bread no longer exists, having been replaced by the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ. "Consubstantiation" from Fr. ...


9

Articles 3 and 4 of the Augsburg Confession (part of the Lutheran Confessions) talk about this: The Augsburg Confession (Chief Articles of Faith: Article III: Of the Son of God and Article IV: Of Justification). Article 3 makes the point that Christ "truly suffered, was crucified, dead, and buried, that He might reconcile the Father unto us, and be a ...


8

According to this article: Has Martin Luther's "Snow-Covered Dunghill" Mystery-Legend Been Solved?! the answer to the question is, "No, he did not say that, but it sounds like something he would have said." Luther said: Conceived in sorrow and corruption, the child sins in his mother’s womb. As he grows older, the innate element of corruption develops. ...


8

I am a WELS Lutheran. The idea that we refuse to pray with other Christians is a carricature of us. It is not totally accurate. My pastor says that public prayer is always off limits but private prayer is something that requires a bit of discretion. I have a good example of something that happened in our church. The parocial school that is attached to ...


8

Both Luther and the Rosicrucians have written about what the emblems represent, and the explanations differ quite a bit. In a 1530 letter to Lazarus Spengler, Luther wrote: Such a heart should stand in the middle of a white rose, to show that faith gives joy, comfort, and peace. In other words, it places the believer into a white, joyous rose, for this ...


7

The Protestant Reformation is based on, among other things, "sola scriptura"--that the Bible alone is the basis for all doctrine and practice. There are probably two essential points in this matter. The Priesthood of All Believers First, a common doctrine of Protestants is the priesthood of all believers. It is believed that there is no biblical ...


7

Yes, it is true that Luther published anti-semitic writings -- writings that were even used by the Nazi Party in support of its horrendous treatment of Jews. The case that Luther's writings were terribly anti-semitic was, in fact, made by the Luthern Church Missouri Synod itself, seeking to distance itself from that hot potato. On the FAQ section of the ...


7

First, a Lutheran is not likely to recognize the phrase "salvation by faith". The usual construct Lutherans use is "justification by faith". For Lutherans, there is a distinction between the two. Salvation was assured by Jesus' death and resurrection. Justification assures believers that they are made worthy of the salvation secured for them by Jesus ...


7

Patron saints are not, in general, centrally designated by the Vatican. (St Thomas More is a notable exception. He was declared patron saint of statesmen and politicians by the motu proprio E Sancti Thomae Mori, issued by Pope St John Paul II in 2000.) The Catholic Encyclopedia's article on patron saints discusses only patron saints of churches and ...


6

Lutherans do not generally use the term consubstantiation. Nor do they use the term impanation. Impanation, by analogy to the Incarnation, would imply some kind of hypostatic union between the bread and Christ (just as between the human and divine natures in Christ), which is explicitly rejected by the Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord (6.38). The ...


6

Paul Kretzmann, the son of a Lutheran pastor, wrote his Popular Commentary of the Bible, which "has been a favorite among confessional Lutherans since publication of the first volume in 1921." In his comments on Hebrews 6, he called attention to the characteristics of the one who is spoken of in the passage: they were once enlightened, tasted of ...


6

In the Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Philipp Melanchthon identifies two distinct meanings of the word "sacrifice," rejecting one (the Roman Catholic view) and accepting the other: The proximate species of sacrifice are two, and there are no more. One is the propitiatory sacrifice, i.e., a work which makes satisfaction for guilt and punishment, i.e., ...


5

From the WELS website: If anyone is willing to sit down and talk with us, we'd be happy to explain what we mean and what statements of the Bible are involved...If we find that the other people are ignorant or unaware of the errors in their churches, we would never avoid or refuse to encourage them or possibly even worship with them on occasion. It looks ...


5

Consubstantiation is not Lutheran theology. Lutheran theology rejects consubstantiation in favor of "Sacramental Union" [sacramentatem unionem]. See the Book of Concord, "The Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord"; Sect. VII "The Holy Supper"; esp. subpara. 38. Lutheran theology holds that the True Body and True Blood of Christ are present in the ...


5

The Reformed and Lutheran theologians of the late 16th and 17th centuries are often termed "Protestant Scholastics." Why? Because they took over the methodology of the Medieval Scholastics and produced vast systematic theologies. Concordia Publishing House is currently publishing one example of this, Johann Gerhard's 16 volume systematic theology. The ...


5

The Augustinian tradition, going back to the early anti-Pelagian writing On Nature and Grace, distinguishes between the human nature and the defect of original sin. We have a defective nature, therefore, and that is what we pass on to our children, but Christ is still consubstantial with us even though He was always without sin. Sin is not part of human ...


5

No, the Catholic understanding of justification not occurring by grace alone has not changed. The 1999 Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification has not created any new doctrine, but restates Catholic doctrine on this point. The Canons of the Sixth Session of the Council of Trent include, among others, the following statements: CANON I. If any one ...


5

The First Four Councils The main, but only the main, conclusions of each of the first four Ecumenical Councils were specifically endorsed by both Calvin and Luther personally. These 4 councils are also mentioned by name in the (Calvinist) Second Helvetican Confession, Chapter 11 . The doctrines themselves are also in the Westminster Confession ...


5

The Lutheran denomination, "The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America", which is just one of many bodies using the word "Evangelical" in its name (and it should be noted that there are denominations, mainly in Europe, which adhere to the teachings of Martin Luther which do not include that word in their name) publishes a document available for free download ...


5

There are several ways in which he could be meaning this. One, there are indeed churches that identify themselves as Orthodox (big-O) Lutheran. For example: Lutheran Orthodox Church and Orthodox Lutheran Confessional Conference. This would mean he is a member of a specific church/sect that calls themselves these words. Two, there is a historical era of ...


4

The Lutheran understanding of the Real Presence is that at the consecration, which happens through the power of the Holy Spirit, the bread and wine become the true body and blood of Christ "in, with, and under" the form and substance of bread. "In, with, and under" is the description of the Real Presence in Luther's Smaller Chatechism. I was taught that this ...


4

During the early years of the Reformation "scholasticism" was a word thrown about as something of an insult toward the Roman Catholic Church. Scholasticism identifies the traditional approach (at least through the medieval time period) to developing theology and understanding scripture. And because Reformers were rejecting almost all things Catholic, the ...


4

At least one scholar would say, this was the inherent message of Christianity, from the very beginning. In Paul Among the People: The Apostle Reinterpreted and Reimagined in His Own Time, Sarah Ruden seeks to compare Paul's writings with that of the culture in which he lived. Over and over again, her project is to show how remarkably liberal Paul is when it ...


4

Well, I am not catholic, but there seem to be a question that fascinated and perplexed many of the early Church fathers. Justin Martyr addressed the baptism of Jesus, as a sign that He is manifested as the Christ, a sign for the Church first, and then the world. Now, we know that he did not go to the river because He stood in need of baptism, or of the ...


4

This issue is addressed in the Augsburg Confession, which the LCMC accepts as "normative for our teaching and practice," like many other Lutheran groups. First we'll briefly look at the "evil human imaginations" part of this, before looking more closely at why unsaved people can accomplish good things, which seems to be the main point ...


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