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22

There was a gap of about 400 years between the two Testaments, with the OT covering a vast time span, from creation till then. Taking the time from after the Flood, that alone has been variously calculated as 2,454 years to 2,518 years. This means that the OT deals with about two and a half thousand years of history after the Flood, whereas the NT only ...


20

If you read the whole Bible from Genesis to Revelation, you'll notice: God's consistent character, who is compassionate and merciful to those who love and fear Him but who pours out His wrath to those who are rebellious, unthankful, unfaithful, and disobey His commandments. In the OT He revealed his character to Abraham, Moses, David, the prophets, etc; in ...


17

Wrath is an important part of God's nature. I think a good way into answering this question is to ask the question, 'What did Jesus save us from?' They tell how you turned to God from idols to serve the living and true God, and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead – Jesus, who rescues us from the coming wrath. (1 Thessalonians 1:9-...


13

Paul explains there are two covenants. First we need to understand them. Galatians 4:21-26 21 Tell me, you who desire to be under the law, do you not hear the law? 22 For it is written that Abraham had two sons: the one by a bondwoman, the other by a freewoman. 23 But he who was of the bondwoman was born according to the flesh, and he of the freewoman ...


11

Short answer: The reason is, that Jesus' suffered and died in our place. This is how the bible puts it in Romans 5:6-8 ESV: 6 For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. 7 For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die— 8 but God shows his love for us in ...


11

I am not aware of a verse that says explicitly that "God loves everyone equally". In fact, there are some verses to suggest that some are loved more than others, which is not your question so will be neglected1, but there are several that indicate that God indeed loves all people. The first is probably the most quoted Bible verse of all time: For God so ...


10

To answer this from a doctrinal perspective requires a doctrinal perspective on love. So we ought to turn to 1 Corinthians, chapter 13, Paul's famous homily on Charity (Christian love): 4 Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, 5 Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, ...


10

So, there are passages that are particularly relevant here: Matthew 22:29 - 32 29 Jesus replied, “You are in error because you do not know the Scriptures or the power of God. 30 At the resurrection people will neither marry nor be given in marriage; they will be like the angels in heaven. 31 But about the resurrection of the dead—have you not read what ...


9

It is problematic whenever we attempt to separate the inseparable Trinity, so let us acknowledge that to begin with. The Bible never seems to suggest that the Holy Triune God has the capacity to love in varying measures. Indeed, God only knows one way to love. His love is complete and total--not partial. His love, like He Himself, does not increase or ...


9

Since Paul didn't expand on this, the best we can do is to review what noted theologians have said about this. To get some good answers, you really need to look no further than Bible commentaries. Bear in mind that the type of love here is agape love, which is also translated as charity, or selfless love. It's not speaking of romantic love as on "love ...


8

The commonly held understanding is partially correct, but overstated. In reality, the semantic range of the words is broader. Agape It is true that the words ἀγαπάω (agapaó) and ἀγάπη (agapé) came to mean something like "the highest form of love," but this was primarily due later Christian usage of the term. At the time of the New Testament's writing, ...


8

Romans 9:13 is quoting one of my favorite verses in all of scripture - Malachi 1:2-5. Here's what it says: 2 “I have loved you,” says the Lord. “But you ask, ‘How have you loved us?’ “Was not Esau Jacob’s brother?” declares the Lord. “Yet I have loved Jacob, but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his hill country into a wasteland and left his inheritance ...


8

Love certainly does not mean ignoring sins or not noticing them at all. It is unloving for us to notice a fellow Christian living in sin and not help them. And when they sin against us, we are not to act like nothing happened in all cases, but we are to confront them Biblically when appropriate. R.C. Sproul Jr. wrote an excellent article on the subject here....


8

From the Recapitulatio of Fr. Réginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.'s De Virtutibus Theologicis (p. 20), a commentary on St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica II-II, he gives the following categorization of the virtues (virtutes), following the organization of St. Thomas's treatment of the virtues in his Summa: Here's a rough translation: The Virtues ...


8

I believe that the answer to this is something related to the narrative's approach. We can infer from what we know about the godhead, that the Son loves the Father, but the focus in the gospels narrative is not that, the focus is that the Father loves the Son, then, the Son loves us and the Son obey the Father. I'll try to examplify this with some text. ...


7

ericgorr's answer is really good, but let me write a slightly simpler one. Yes, absolutely God does love everyone. He totally wants the best for them and wants them to be the perfect person they were intended to be. Now the trouble is that for Hitler, being the best he was intended to be absolutely involves not killing millions of people and starting a ...


7

You made the classic mistake people make when they question Jesus' love: they make him a one-dimensional person. So when someone says that God is love, then asks, "then why would God ...," they are assuming that God should respond only in love -- to everything. In the case of sentencing people to hell, Jesus would be acting in the role of judge. Human ...


7

The Scripture does tell us that Jesus can be sorrowful enough to cry: When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come along with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in spirit and troubled. 34 “Where have you laid him?” he asked. “Come and see, Lord,” they replied. Jesus wept. John 11:33-35 Jesus was on his way to see Lazarus. He had ...


7

Wikipedia gives a brief overview of how the commandment has generally been seen as "new." It accords with what I've heard through the years: The "New Commandment", the Wycliffe Bible Commentary states, "was new in that the love was to be exercised toward others not because they belonged to the same nation, but because they belonged to Christ...and the ...


7

First, does God love any individuals particularly? Job believed that he would stand face to face with God, who would hear his complaint and grant him justice. God appeared and spoke to him, and vindicated him before his friends, and blessed him with an abundant life. God promised Abram a son, a nation, and influence throughout the whole world. He gave him ...


6

St. Augustine was referring to the mind that has been "conformed to God" as described in Reading "Mere Christianity" and having a hard time with book III, chapter 12. This is based on established doctrine, common to most denominational views, of Sanctification. Progressive sanctification "Indeed, the more sanctified the person is, the ...


6

I think you've missed some key points in your imagined scenario. It wasn't "a simple message of love" spread by a few ordinary fisherman. Jesus wasn't some hippie revolutionary who got a bunch of followers to parade around telling everybody they should just love each other. What made Christianity appealing was that it was true. This would have been much ...


6

I and my Father are one. John 10:30 Jesus and the Father had the plan of redemption from the beginning of this world. Their plans are the same because they are the same in thought. They love us immensely and equally. Their very essence is love. Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love 1 John 4:8 If you read through 1 John 4 ...


6

The speaker is Michael Oh, the founder of Christ Bible Institute Japan. He is of Korean heritage but grew up in America. I found a video (plus transcript) that explains more fully his animosity toward Japan, and the process of forgiveness he underwent. The video is of a talk he gave on night 5 of the Urbana missions conference in 2009. The animosity ...


6

John 3:16: For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. Romans 8:16-17: The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer ...


5

Before getting into the details of what I've been taught on the subject, for those that don't know, we should first establish the three types of love in common Christian teaching. They are based on the Greek words used that are commonly translated as love. phileo - properly, to show warm affection in intimate friendship, characterized by tender, heartfelt ...


5

If any famous Calvinist could be accused of not believing God loved everyone it would be John Owen one of the foremost Calvinistic theologians. Owen (like Calvin as well) can be misunderstood as those 'who did not believe Christ died for all'. However the more I have read of their works the more I have become convinced that actually nobody has ever-believed ...


5

First off, we can't interpret "love" in the mushy Valentine's-Day sitcom sense we imagine today. "Love" here is a lot more significant and difficult than that. Love in the Old Testament sense is not divorced from actions. Loving actions don't spring from love; they are an inherent aspect of love. As wax eagle points out in the comments above, sexual ...


5

1 Corinthians 13 is one of those chapters that tends to be read at weddings and get taken out of context. Because of its association with weddings, many associate it with romantic love, and David Stratton is right to say clearly that this is not what Paul was thinking about. If you look at chapter 12, you'll see that Paul was addressing the issue of the ...


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