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Your version matches exactly the version from the Book of Common Prayer of US Episcopal church. Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy Name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, ...


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It's surely just a typo. The word in the original languages here is hagiastheto which is both passive and a third person imperative. A third person imperative in English is something like this. Who will clean the room? Let Danny clean it! Let here sounds a lot like giving permission in modern English. We don't use 3rd person imperatives. We use 2nd person ...


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As noted, this is possibly one of the most commonly used English translations, used by many denominations. As for the source... it probably came out of some church council or another. It is close to, but not exactly, what appears in Matthew 6:9b-13 KJV: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. 10 Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as ...


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Here's my take: First, the Greek can mean test or it can mean tempt or it can mean try (trial). Now, let's look at other scriptures for context: Jesus was led by God (Spirit) into the wilderness to be tested/tempted (Mt 4:1). God led him into the trial, where Satan did the tempting. God does not tempt anyone (James 1:13). But He does test/try us (Asked ...


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I'm not sure how directly relevant this is, but in 1 Chronicles 29:10-11 are found the phrases "our father", "for ever and ever", "the power and the glory", and "thine is the kingdom". Matthew must surely be telling us that our Lord Jesus took these phrases from David's prayer to make the Lord's Prayer. At least, that ...


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