20

There are two differences here: "from evil" (KJV) versus "from the evil one" (NIV) "for thine is the kingdom..." in the KJV but not the NIV. The first difference reflects an alternative translation choice for the Greek word "πονηροῦ". This might be in the masculine or the neuter gender - the word forms are the same. But there is a difference in meaning: if ...


16

I can't find this doxology in the lords prayer as recorded in scripture It is in the King James Version: And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. but the underlying Greek is missing in some manuscripts. Metzger's Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (...


11

The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from them. ...


10

It is not a prescribed part of the liturgy, and appears to be an accretion from Protestant tradition. One authoritative source says To find the rubrics (regulations which govern the Mass) concerning these gestures, one may turn to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (1970), On Holy Communion and the Worship of the Eucharistic Mystery Outside of Mass ...


9

A Catholic priest, Father William Saunders, answers here: Who Added The Doxology? To summarize: The doxology is very old, going back to the first century. To quote the article: In the early Church, the Christians living in the eastern half of the Roman Empire added the doxology "for thine..." to the Gospel text of the Our Father when reciting the ...


9

In Luke 11:1 one of Jesus’ disciples said to Jesus, “Lord, teach us to pray”. The NIV Study Bible Notes give this explanation regarding Luke 11:1-4: The Lord’s Model Prayer was given here in answer to a request... The prayer is a pattern for believers , who have already been forgiven for their sins. Jesus speaks here of daily forgiveness, which is ...


7

The difficulty in answering this question is that the liturgy of the early Church was largely oral in nature, and so we contain virtually no records from the early Church itself regarding what it exactly did in its own liturgy. Contrary to the author who posted the quote you use, if we have evidence of the Lord's Prayer in use even several centuries later ...


5

Short Answer: there isn't a contradiction A reference to the larger treatment of both Prayer and the Eucharist in the Catechism, and not taking out of context the official teaching should prevent seeing a contradiction in what the Pope said (which conformed to the agenda of the 2005 Ordinary Synod). Amplification The answer is within the brief quote from ...


4

The Our Father has not been wrongly translated. It is Catholic dogma of the highest degree (de fide) that there are no errors in Holy Scripture, and the 4th Session of the Council of Trent defined the dogma that St. Jerome's Vulgate translation—which says in both Mt. 6:13 and Lk. 11:4: "et ne nos inducas in tentationem" ("lead us not into temptation")—is "...


4

Although Jesus was likely to have spoken Aramaic or Hebrew, the Gospels were preserved in Greek using the word πατήρ/πάτερ, as was noted in the comments; this became the Latin pater. In England up to the Reformation, liturgically the Lord's Prayer was always in Latin. However, Wikisource has Old English (10th–11th century) and Middle English (14th ...


4

Forgiving others is very, very important. Firstly, we emphasize the primary importance of love in the life of a believer: The goal of this command is love, which comes from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith. 1 TImothy 1:5 NIV Compare also the well known Great Commandment. The vital importance of forgiving others is made manifest when ...


4

Sort of? Strictly speaking it comes from the medieval manuscripts which the reformation theologians inherited, but it is not quite that simple. The text is clearly missing from the most ancient manuscripts of Matthew, but it was present in the Renaissance. Someone in some scriptorium added that passage at a later date. On the other hand, we know that the ...


4

In the record of the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6, the additional phrase appears in the 1611 edition of the KJV, the Tyndale Bible, and, it appears, in the German Luther Bible of 1545. I can't read German, except for "Amen", but it looks like it's there. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, ...


4

After hours of research, I have found only one Trinitarian denomination where SOME members believe it is wrong to pray to Jesus. It is the Churches of Christ, not to be confused with the International Churches of Christ. Here is an extract from a relevant article which also shows why the majority of Churches of Christ members don’t have a problem in ...


3

The reason for the presence or absence of the brief doxology at the end of the Lord's Prayer is actually liturgical use. In Eastern-rite usage, the doxology is recited in the liturgy after the Lord's Prayer; this is probably how the phrase crept into Eastern Greek mediaeval manuscripts of the New Testament. These manuscripts are ultimately the ones on which ...


3

We pray to our heavenly Father, in Jesus' name, for several reasons (most reasoning sourced here): We are told to address all prayer to God the Father. (see also 1 Peter 1:17 and Ephesians 3:14) This, then, is how you should pray: ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name,' (Matthew 6:9) We can only approach the Father in the name of Jesus, the Son ...


3

This may be a simplistic answer, but it came as something of an "aha!" moment to me when I first heard it many years ago: In general, it is probably not the best idea to ask God to do something God doesn't want to do, or to ask God not to do something God does want to do. Presumably God's will and God's knowledge of the situation is better than ours. So if ...


3

Martin Luther once participated in a debate with Ulrich Zwingli’s over whether the Lords Supper was actually the body of Christ or simply a remembrance of it. It is reported that Martin Luther walked into the debate, went up to the board and took a piece of chalk and wrote “This Is my Body” then left the debate without looking back. The translation of the ...


2

As an earlier respondent noted, Stephen prayed to the Lord Jesus at the moment of his death. Other examples of prayers directed to Jesus include Peter, while attempting to walk on water, and the disciples on the boat when Jesus calmed the storm. 28 And Peter answered him and said, Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water. 29 And he said, ...


2

<<>> One specific Biblical reference comes to mind in the martyrdom of Stephen. When Stephen lifts up his eyes to Heaven, just before he dies he prays (cries out) Acts 7:59 "While they were stoning him, Stephen prayed, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” 60 Then he fell on his knees and cried out, “Lord, do not hold this sin against them.” When he had ...


2

Assuming that most Christians--if not a vast majority of Christians, regardless of denominations--consider the Bible to be at least somewhat authoritative in faith and practice, I suggest you read the verse in question in context to arrive at a partial answer, if not the answer. On more than one occasion Jesus used threes (3's) in his teaching. In the ...


2

One commentator on scripture presents the reward as Grace. If you view prayer as a sincere communication with God, in humility, the commentary comes to a rational conclusion. Responding to God's call will include communication with God, in prayer and in other ways. {Catechism of the Catholic Church 1996} Grace is favor, the free and undeserved help ...


2

Euan Cameron says, in Interpreting Christian History, page 126-7, the early Church had no cult of saints, but around the time of the persecutions, Christians began to commemorate their martyrs, to inspire their successors and protect their memory. A little later, some Church Fathers decided that the saints must still feel the same concern for the faithful ...


2

To answer your three questions concisely: • Can the pope mandate such a change, worldwide? He can, based on what was done with the significant changes to the English language versions of the Liturgy in 2011. Be aware that it usually takes a lot of staff effort by the various bishops, cardinals, et al in the Vatican. In 2002, Saint John Paul II ...


2

In Matthew 6:9, after Jesus criticised how Pharisees and others pray, we read things like (depending on the Bible version): Pray then like this: Our Father... This, then, is how you should pray: Our Father... So then, this is how you should pray: Our Father... We find similar phrases in Luke 11:2. It is evident that Jesus was teaching his disciples (and us)...


2

The Lord's prayer as our daily statement of purpose and petition for support My faith tells me that everything happens according to the Lord's will anyway, so why pray asking for this to happen if I believe that this is the only thing that can ever happen in any circumstances anyway? I know you didn't mean it, but your statement implies fate / destiny, as ...


2

In Christian theology, God is thought of as expressing His will in more than one way. This article goes into some of those categories from a Reformed perspective: https://www.monergism.com/discerning-god%E2%80%99s-will-three-wills-god By quoting Augustine, the previous article draws on Roman Catholic sources, and by quoting John Calvin, the Reformed ...


1

Jehovah's Witnesses have an interesting perspective on this question because they believe the signs of Christ's presence (Matthew 24:7-14) are already visible. JWs don't believe we can literally "speed up" the end of this system of things, because the Father already knows when it will be (Matthew 24:36). However, they still pray for God's Kingdom ...


1

The issue you raised is rooted in the concept of justification. Through the fulfillment of the will of the Father in His Son, Jesus Christ, the Father declared us righteous in His sight. That is, the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ is our justification, the declaration of God that we are free of guilt and penalty of sin and acceptable to Him (Romans ...


1

At Matthew 6: 9 , before teaching the Lord's Prayer Jesus says: “This, then, is how you should pray..." . He did not say : " This is WHAT you should pray ..." . Theoretically at least, `Our Father..' was NOT intended to be the ultimate prayer , but was taught as a model prayer. Th Holy Eucharist goes much beyond, by offering the Body and Blood of the ...


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