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Atheism is a belief system which makes claims about spiritual things. Atheism says there are no gods, but so do other belief systems which no one denies are religions, such as some forms of Buddhism. Atheism contrasts with religions, rather than social or political movements like egalitarianism, anarchism, communism, so it makes sense to classify it as a ...


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Divine Relations are depicted in green: (original image source) The Father is God. The Son is God. The Holy Spirit is God. Here, "is" means "has the same essence as." (cf. St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica I q. 39 a. 1 question "Whether in God the essence is the same as the person?") the Father is not the Son, the Son is not the Holy Spirit, the ...


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Short answer is, “identity.” Each Divine Person is perfectly identical to the Divine Essence. Perhaps the best exposition of this idea is given by St. Thomas Aquinas in the Summa theologiae [S.Th.]. Keep in mind that the Persons, fundamentally, are relations of origin: the Father is Fatherhood; the Son is Sonship or Generation, and the Spirit is Procession. (...


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I am not sure about the word religion, but one can argue that (a form of) atheism is a belief system. A belief system is a system of beliefs. Some beliefs depend on others, forming an interrelated set of beliefs and their implications. Strong atheism is defined as belief that there are no gods. Many call this just "atheism". Well, this belief has ...


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Anselm of Canterbury attempts to do exactly this in his Monologion, an 11th century work that attempts to logically deduce God's existence and attributes without the use of Scripture. Overview in Proslogion Anselm's later and better-known work, Proslogion, provides a helpful summary: after establishing the existence of God through the ontological argument (§...


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Re-appropriating the term atheism is what is causing the issue. If we break the word down it is clear that the first definition should be "a belief that there is or are no god(s)." The prefix a has long been used as a reversal, or negation, for the term that follows it. The suffix ism has long been used for any kind of belief or organized thought system. The ...


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I haven't personally read Alvin Plantinga, but I've read that he tried to answer question of "natural evil" in a very interesting way. See some short description here http://www.iep.utm.edu/evil-log/#H6 and more in his books: "The Nature of Necessary", "God, Freedom, and Evil". What I personally think is that there is a great problem of perception. I think ...


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St. Thomas Aquinas, in his Summa Theologiæ ("Sum of Theologies"), answers the question "Whether the trinity of the divine persons can be known by natural reason?" by saying: It is impossible to attain to the knowledge of the Trinity by natural reason. For, as above explained (Question [12], Articles [4],12), man cannot obtain the ...


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Christians have addressed this in various ways: Some (a very small minority), such as Marcion challenged premise 1. - they didn't believe in the Old Testament. Most Christians have rejected this approach to the extent of labelling those who adopt it as being heretical. A slightly bigger group (comprising the likes of Seventh Day Adventists and Messianic ...


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Original sin is not so much an action of a person, but rather a position into which one is born. As such, the idea of justice (merit of reward or punishment) does not even enter the equation in understanding original sin. But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely ...


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First: God's ethical system was instituted through Moses and required an animal sacrifice for the sins of the people. However, this sacrifice was for specific sins and therefore had to be repeated for each one. The sacrifce was an adjunct to the law which showed God's undeserved kindness (Grace). The idea was that the person need not sufffer the consequences ...


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The law was created before Eve sinned, or she could not have broken Gods Law, God wrote this same law on stone to people that had come out of slavery in Egypt and starts it with l am the Lord your God Noah was not a Jew, The prescription for eating meat was given after the flood The Sabbbath was created and blessed on the 7th day of creation, scripture ...


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It sounds like you think generation of the Son by the Father implies there was a time when the Son did not exist; however, all three Persons are co-eternal. St. Thomas, in Summa Theologica I q. 27 a. 2 ("Whether any procession in God can be called generation?") c., distinguishes between and compares the two senses of "generation": The procession of the ...


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Good evening, I have broken your question down and cited the relevant scriptural response. What is the biblical basis that such a logical problem exists? The bible acknowledges that the world is currently under the power of the evil one thus raising the question of why is evil granted any power?: 19 We know that we are God’s children, and that the ...


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I'd like to give you an answer just on one aspect of your question: If the answer is 1), identity ... If A = B & B = C then A = C? What we have here is a problem with language: First of all Frege identified four different meanings of the word "to be". This does not mean that there cannot be more meanings Frege did not know. And second you should ...


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When we say "Son is God; Father is God; Spirit is God", the "is" is of predicate for property or essence; the option (2). The three persons in Trinity shares divine property. On the other hand it is (1) when we say Son is not Father, we use "is" for identity. The three are not a single person sharing different roles or names. They are three persons sharing ...


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The short answer is that, yes, Jesus, the Divine Son, is 100% God (and also 100% man), provided we understand that God does not have “parts” and so could percentages could never be properly attributed to Him. As the O.P. correctly intuits, the root of the answer lies in the distinction between person and nature. First of all, it is important to state from ...


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I think the answer here is to be found in the glory of God. The catechism says that "Man's chief end is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever." That would sound silly if God were a mere man, or even someone as petty as the Greek or Norse gods. But if you take the God of the Bible, Who knows everything, is all-powerful, is all-good, and all-wise, then it seems ...


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In addition to the criteria mentioned above, historically there was a claim of apostolic authorship. See: https://christianity.stackexchange.com/a/5527/1039


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