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22

There seems to be two questions here. First, "why are LDS temple ceremonies kept secret, seeing as how Old Testament temple ceremonies were not?" The simple answer is that the Old Testament temples operated under the Law of Moses and were administered by the Levitical priesthood, whereas modern temples operate under the Law of the Gospel and are ...


17

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


16

It is simply Greek that has been written in Roman letters. The city of Rome was essentially bilingual from around the time of Caesar Augustus until at least the third or fourth century A.D.: the people spoke mostly vulgar Latin or common (Koine) Greek. Greek was the more common language among the poor, who formed the majority of the ranks of the Church at ...


15

Clear statements against the use of prerecorded music have been made by the National Association of Pastoral Musicians ("On the Use of Pre-Recorded Music in the Liturgy") and Paul S. Jones (Singing and Making Music). Both emphasize two arguments: Authentic worship requires active participation Recordings are static and inflexible Authentic ...


14

The Phrase "Holy catholic Church" does not refer to the Roman Catholic church, but to the "universal church", i.e. all true Christians, whatever earthly religious organization they belong to. The word 'catholic' just means universal. That and the "Communion of Saints" refers to a belief in the essential unity of all true Christians, whatever disagreements ...


13

[Answer from high-church Anglican/Catholic perspective.] The deacon is not censed — or should not be censed — at the reading of the gospel. The thurifer should hand the thurible to the deacon, who censes the book. The thurifer generally remains while the gospel is read, and indeed the gospel may end up proclaimed from within the cloud. Incense ...


13

Before the Gospel is read, a Catholic makes signs of the cross, with the thumb, on his or her forehead, mouth, and heart, which represents that the Catholic must understand the Gospel, proclaim it, and "take it to heart," i.e., put it into practice, with charity. Dom Prosper Guéranger's Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of the Holy Mass (...


12

It's not a choice between the two as the question seems to be asking. The temple is not actually a meetinghouse where ordinary worship services are held. (In fact, temples are closed on Sundays.) Latter-Day Saints regard the temple as the House of the Lord, a highly sacred place where, like the temple in the Old Testament, very special, sacred ordinances ...


10

Different communities adopted Arabic at various times. The earliest community to start using Arabic were the Greek Orthodox of Palestine, who started translating the liturgy and theological books into Arabic in the 8th century. For a more general history of Arab Christianity, I'd consult The Church in the Shadow of the Mosque by Sidney Griffith. For evidence ...


10

There are a number of related questions here. The Bishop of Rome The Bishop of Rome (i.e., the Pope), being the universal pastor of the Catholic Church, may celebrate in any rite he wishes at any moment. There is not a specific norm in the Canon Law (abbreviated CIC)—the law for the Western church—or the Code of Canons of Oriental churches (abbreviated ...


10

If by “Tridentine Mass” the O.P. means the Mass promulgated by Pope Pius V in 1570 (probably better termed the “traditional Roman Rite”), which was used widely in that form until the liturgical reforms after Vatican II (and is still used to varying degrees today), then the answer is that it is basically only used in Latin, with a small number of exceptions ...


10

Why do Catholics sign themselves three (3) times just before the Gospel is read? To understand the significance of this tradition, let us take a look into its origins. Concerning the making the sign of the cross at the proclamation of the Holy Gospel, after the deacon or priest says, “A reading from the Holy Gospel according to ….,” he and the faithful ...


9

Contrary to what you say about missals, the rubrics in my missal (The CTS New Daily Missal) say that before the reading of the gospel, "He [the deacon/priest] makes the Sign of the Cross on the book and, together with the people, on his forehead, lips, and breast." (emphasis added)


8

The Oriental Orthodox churches are somewhat divided on this, many still celebrate the Divine Liturgy in Syriac (which is a later dialect of Middle Aramaic). One of the biggest reasons is that many Oriental Orthodox consider the Syriac Peshitta to be the authoritative scriptures, some even insisting on New Testament Aramaic primacy (such as the Nestorians/...


8

How can one characterize (a rite)? A rite represents tradition about how sacraments (not just Mass) are celebrated. As the early Church grew and spread, it celebrated the sacraments as would be best understood and received in the context of individual cultures, without ever changing their essential form and matter. Which forms of Mass (rites) are ...


8

The practice is entirely biblical. At the Last Supper, Christ took a single cup at the end of the meal and handed it round the apostles: Mt 26:27 And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he gave it to them, saying, “Drink of it, all of you; for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.” The ...


8

The simplifying or outright dismantling of liturgies has been in train since the beginning of the Reformation, particularly as it started to unfold in Switzerland under Huldrych Zwingli. From the linked Wikipedia article: Shortly before Easter (1525), Zwingli and his closest associates requested the council to cancel the mass and to introduce the new ...


8

By way of answer, I refer you to this article on the history of Christian meetings. I'll summarize some sections. In the first century, Christians generally met in homes, especially the homes of more prominent members. The Acts of the Apostles portrays the first Christian community in Jerusalem as gathering in the temple colonnades and “breaking bread in ...


8

Another exception to Athanasius' answer is Mass in the Ordinariate Use, published in Divine Worship: The Missal in 2015. This order is in traditional-language English ("thee, thou" etc), and it's possible to construct an English-language Mass which is practically identical to the Traditional Latin Mass. We celebrate one such Mass weekly, and have even used ...


8

First, a point of terminology. Do you live near a Mormon temple (a large and spectacular building, recognizable by a distinctive golden statue of an angel with a trumpet on top) or a Mormon church (an ordinary church building, usually with a spire)? Temples are very special and sacred places that are only available to members of the church in good standing....


8

The YouTube link you referred to is not the official channel of Jehovah’s Witnesses. It is a private account posted by an individual who was obviously present or received a recording of some meetings or convention programs. (I did not watch the entire videos, but At a glance it looks just like one) ALL OF OUR MEETINGS ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, they are not ...


8

It is directly pulled from the Bible. Based on my answer to this question: As far as scripture goes, the salutation is from Ruth 2:4 and 2 Chronicles 15:2 in the Vulgate. In Ruth, the phrase appears in the sentence, "Et ecce ipse veniebat de Bethlehem dixitque messoribus: 'Dominus vobiscum'. Qui responderunt ei: 'Benedicat tibi Dominus'." ("[Boaz himself] ...


7

Episcopalians: The ushers count the congregation and count the wafers to match. If they miscounted the Priest in charge reserves the wafers in a "tabernacle" on the altar. They drink all of the wine/water. If a wafer is dropped it is retrieved quickly and consumed by the Priest. Whether or not individuals believe the wafer is the actual body of Christ is ...


7

I attended meetings of the Vineyard for a period of a year and the members there exercised the gifts of the Spirit, with multiple people, one at a time, giving revelation and prophesying, tongues and interpretations. Then they bunched together and prayed for healings for the afflicted. I attended a Brethren-inspired gathering for about 8 years. There, they ...


7

Imprecatory Psalms John Wesley escised 34 Psalms altogether, and removed portions of another 58. To imprecate means to invoke evil upon, or curse. Imprecatory psalms, also called the cursing psalms, are those psalms that contain prayers for God's judgment on the psalmist's enemies. Examples: "Let death take my enemies by surprise; let them go down ...


7

The difficulty in answering this question is that the liturgy of the early Church was largely oral in nature, and so we contain virtually no records from the early Church itself regarding what it exactly did in its own liturgy. Contrary to the author who posted the quote you use, if we have evidence of the Lord's Prayer in use even several centuries later ...


7

Yes the LDS believe it is a pure restoration of first century Christian liturgy and beliefs. True to the Faith specifies what was lost during the Apostasy: After His Crucifixion and the deaths of His Apostles, the fulness of the gospel was taken from the earth About the restoration, the LDS specifically believe: When Jesus Christ was on the earth, He ...


7

One does not replace the other: a faithful member of the Church will attend regular, weekly Sunday meetings and attend the temple when possible. Temples are usually open during the week and Saturday, as opposed to Sundays. The ordinances of the temple do not replace the ordinance of the Sacrament administered in Sunday meetings, and both temple and Sacrament ...


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