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Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up ...


10

I alerted Martin Kochanski, the author of Universalis, to this question, and he's written a blog post specially for it, to which readers are referred. The simple answer is: on certain days in the four-week cycle, the Breviary has a small and slightly obscure rubric whose effect is that the complementary psalms aren't allowed at a certain daytime Hour. No ...


9

I've posted a detailed answer to this interesting question on the Universalis blog. Universalis reproduces exactly what the official books are doing: the Latin Liturgia horarum and its English equivalents. The reason isn't given anywhere in the books, as far as I know, but it is this: if you used the complementary psalms at Sext on Monday in the third week ...


6

As a lifelong Protestant, born into a Protestant family, then converted, personally, at the age of sixteen and a Protestant ever since, it is evident to me - if to no other - that the very nature of 'Protestantism' is a protest against, among other things, ritualistic and formal religion imposed on the individual without a decree or ordinance attached which ...


6

The following is a list of omitted verses and Chapters from the four week plaster, currently in use. It follows modern numbering. Not Septuagint numbering. Psalms Omitted Completely: Psalm 58 Psalm 83 Psalm 109 Verses Omitted from Particular Psalms: Psalm 5: 11 Psalm 21: 9-13 Psalm 28: 4-5 Psalm 31: 18-19 Psalm 40: 15-16 Psalm 54: 7 Psalm 55: 16 Psalm 56:...


6

The answer is that you should not read the invitatory at Vigils, as it is meant to begin the day's prayer. The invitatory is placed at the beginning of the whole sequence of the day's prayer, that is, it precedes either morning prayer or the office of readings, whichever of these liturgical rites begins the day. -General Instruction of the Liturgy of ...


6

Do clerics commit a sin if they do not recite the liturgy of the hours? The short answer is yes. First of all, we must distinguish among those who have an obligation to pray the Divine Office. All Latin-rite priests and transitional deacons have the grave obligation, undertaken in the moment of ordination, to pray the entire Liturgy of the Hours: "Are ...


5

The Ordinariates' official office book is currently in preparation, but there does exist the Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham of the UK Ordinariate [the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham]. That contains the Order for Evening Prayer which is very similar to the Evensong of the Book of Common Prayer of the Church of England. It contains the ...


4

The format you have specified looks correct, but we follow a slightly different format: In the absence of a priest or deacon, it is recommended to have one person who presides the office. It is to be noted that he is only one among equals and he does not greet and bless the people. (GILoH 258) The one who Presides says the opening versicle (God come to my ...


4

The first thought that crossed my mind was that the obligation (at least today) of reciting the Divine Office (including Vespers) was limited to the clergy and Religious. The obligation of reciting Vespers on Holy Thursday and Good Friday has been dispensed with in our day in order to make the burden of fasting and long hours of liturgical prayer less ...


4

"Matins" was traditionally sung overnight, or in the very early morning. The name comes from the Latin "matutinae" which means "morning [hours]". In the 1960s,with a revision of the Divine Office, Matins was removed from those hours which must be sung (or said). It was renamed "The Office of Readings", and is permitted to be used at any time. Lauds was ...


3

How to learn to chant the Liturgy of the Hours? One could say it would great to self learn how to do it. But that leaves the learner not knowing if the Chant is properly being done. Thus, the best way to learn how to chant the Liturgy is to get some practical experience through either attending regularly a religious institution where Chant is being sung. ...


3

I am glad you enjoyed sung Liturgy of the Hours. The "music part where one word was underlined" is called the mediant, and the music changes accordingly with that word (or syllable). If you are working with a text that does not have the mediant identified (such as a common breviary), you determine it on the basis of meter and spacing. It is only possible ...


3

For the Eastern Orthodox Church: Magnificat: Sung at daily Matins, after the Psalter readings and Psalm 50 (LXX) Benedictus: I don't believe is sung regularly at any service. It is, however, the Gospel reading for Matins and the Divine Liturgy on the Feast Day of the Nativity of John the Baptist (June 24) Nunc Dimittis: Read during each daily Vespers, near ...


3

I don't think this is a question about protestantism in general - your mention of Anglicans, Lutherans and Methodists would say that. I, as an Anglican, would count myself very much as a protestant! The issue you mention is I think more to do with many protestant churches seeing themselves as independent or noncomformist. I myself was raised in an ...


3

It may not have a name. The melodies of the tune are rather standard chant formulae used in Anglo Catholic circles, but not necessarily specifically for the Angelus, so it may not be a formal, named hymn tune, or if it is a named tune, it may be in very limited distribution. You might try to contact the organist of the congregtion mentioned in the comments ...


3

The psalm prayer consists of optional prayers that may be said after each psalm. The General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours describes them as follows: 112. Psalm-prayers for each psalm are given in the supplement to the Liturgy of the Hours, to help in understanding them in a predominantly Christian way. They may be used in the ancient ...


2

Should praying the Liturgy of the Hours in private be out loud or silent? When I was in a monastery, we generally prayed the Divine Office silently when recited in private. One could if one wanted to pray the Liturgy of the Hours out loud if done in private. However if one is praying the Divine Office while one is waiting in a doctor’s office for example, ...


2

The Breviary and the Roman Martyrology are two separate books. In the Pre- Vatican II Divine Office the Martyrology was read at the conclusion of Prime. The reading of the Martyrology is added to the Office of Prime and is not an essential part of it. Thus the reading of the Roman Martyrology can be dispensed with. The Feast of St. Martin for the universal ...


2

Commonalities between the Horologion (Eastern Divine Office) and the Divinum Officium (Roman Office): Psalms are all found, that is assured. Some differences between the Divinum Officium and the Horologion: The Hours in the Eastern Church often are made up of a variety of different books. Whereas the Hours of the Roman Church can be used within a single ...


2

The traditional pattern of Anglican worship consists of three main public services: Holy Communion, Matins and Evensong; also called the Eucharist, Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer respectively. Morning and Evening Prayer are together known as the Daily Office. One of the great difficulties with choosing a suitable lectionary (i.e. schedule of readings), ...


2

In the General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours, there are no particular norms (rules) for which ending or formula you may use to conclude the Prayer of the Day with. That said one is free to use the concluding formula of one's choice. The concluding prayer has several options to end the prayer and although the formula "through our Lord Jesus Christ ...


1

Is Sung Matins a form of mass? No, but Matins does form part of the Divine Office Matins is the first official set of prayers that all religious and all ordained members (priests and deacons) of the Church must recite each day. Matins is followed by Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers and Compline. Some communities prefer to recite or sing (Chant) their ...


1

Your practice seems total OK to me. There is some room for variation in the praying of the Liturgy of the Hours. In the General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours sometimes no rule is given, sometimes a variation is explicitly stated. Jayarathina's answer is good, but I want to tell how we do it at a German seminary: One priest (P) presides and one ...


1

"Evening prayer" in the Divine Office* is called vespers. According to The Divine Office: A Study of the Roman Breviary by Rev. E.J. Quigley, Vespers, in structure, resembles Lauds and consists of five Psalms. You can explore the so-called Kalendarium of the Divine Office here. That website also lets you compare these editions of the Office: pre-...


1

My reply is generic because not all Protestants believe the same things, there is a great variance with that wide-ranging, generic term which historically refers to protesting against the Catholic Church or what it believes. For the first replier, it certainly has nothing to do with vain repetitions, otherwise Protestants would only pray the Our Father ...


1

Each Protestant body does different things. Remember, "Protestant" is not a denomination. Various bodies actually do practice it, including Lutherans. As a Lutheran, we have it in our Divine Service book. There is also the Book of Common Prayer available. We don't see it as "vain repetition", but rather a solid structure - just as many recite the Lord's ...


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