9

John Piper is a Five Point Calvinist. From the limited atonement section of Bethlehem Baptist Church's doctrinal position "What We Believe About the Five Points of Calvinism" (compiled by Piper and "the Council of Elders"): On the other hand we do not limit the power and effectiveness of the atonement. We simply say that in the cross God had in view the ...


9

Limited atonement brings with it the implication that not anyone can be saved by Christ - only those for whom he atoned. The language used in the Bible to describe salvation is inclusive. It is described as being presented to whosoever wills. In 1 Timothy, Paul claims that God desires all people to be saved. 1 Timothy 2:3-6 (ESV) 3  This is good,...


7

This question comes from two false premises. That the claim that Calvinists depend on a logical fallacy when they point to the particularized language of the Bible. That the Calvinist argument for "limited atonement" depends exclusively on such inferences. First, let's address the alleged fallacy. When exegeting scripture, it is not enough to treat the ...


6

Limited Atonement Defined Limited atonement is defined in the Canons of Dort: The Second Main Point of Doctrine: Christ's Death and Human Redemption Through It Article 3: The Infinite Value of Christ’s Death This death of God’s Son is the only and entirely complete sacrifice and satisfaction for sins; it is of infinite value and worth, more ...


6

Calvinists see the "whole world" in this passage as referring to the elect throughout the world, particularly emphasizing that Christ died for Gentiles as well as Jews. Examples Examples of this approach abound. John Gill: that is, not for the Jews only, for John was a Jew, and so were those he wrote unto, but for the Gentiles also (source) Similarly,...


6

You perception of what limited atonement means is incorrect, therefore, your analogy is flawed. Limited atonement is not a declaration that the atonement is not enough to cover the world. On the contrary, Christ's death is infinitely sufficient. Limited atonement is a declaration that the world will only receive atonement in limited number (i.e. the elect). ...


5

Short Answer: John Piper is clearly a five-point Calvinist. There appears to be no valid reason to think he is a four-point Calvinist. More Information: There are a number of places on the web that claim that John Piper denies the doctrine of limited atonement -- the "L" in "TULIP," the acronym associated with five-point Calvinism. It appears that none of ...


4

The Bible doesn't really say that Jesus' blood is sufficient for all, but it strongly suggests it. Jesus is the perfect lamb, and He give the power to become a son of God to " as many as received him." Surely the Lord God's blood is more than sufficient for the atonement of anyone He wishes to atone. However, in regards to the Blood's efficacy, this is a ...


4

I've looked in numerous systematic theologies and books on evangelism written by Calvinists, and none of them address this particular issue, even though they address many other challenging verses related to the doctrine of limited atonement. There are probably two reasons for this: Some Calvinists are okay with saying "Christ died for your sins" to people ...


3

There are two common approaches to dealing with this challenge. I'll quote from Calvinists Robert Reymond for the first, and Charles Hodge for the second. That "ruin" (apollymi) here does not mean being ultimately lost That the conditional language is a warning that God uses as a means to secure his promise of protecting the elect Contextual meaning of ...


3

The answer to Paul's question : Shall the weak brother perish ? (I Corinthians 8:11 - KJV - απολειται ο ασθενων αδελφος) is ... no he shall not perish. The reason that the weak brother will not perish is : ... for whom Christ died. (I Corinthians 8:11 - KJV - δι ον χριστος απεθανεν) The brother will not perish (or 'be destroyed') because Christ died ...


3

You are asking for a solution to what you see as an intractable problem. A classically Arminian view has been stated. The Five Points of Arminianism include these three (which relate directly to your question): 1) Man, although affected by the Fall, was not totally incapable of choosing spiritual good, and was able to exercise faith in God in order to ...


3

The term'limited atonement' is not actually a helpful term. Every theological position that advocates that Jesus Christ provides an atonement applies some sort of limitation to that atonement with the exception of universalism. For whom did Jesus die The question really boils down to who did Jesus die for, did he die to achieve the actual salvation of the ...


2

Christ is not only the propitiation for the sins of Christians: 1 John 2:1-2 (ESV) My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.1 Even ...


2

I remember the words of an anointed man of God form the past who said; "If Jesus didn't die for all men" than those in hell will legitimately be able to say, "His offer of salvation was never genuine". More important than this kind of logical reasoning is the violation of good, genuine exegesis. If one denies universal atonement, there are simply too ...


2

What is the Biblical argument against Limited Atonement? Proponents claim that because not everyone is saved, God could not have intended that Christ die for everyone. There is an assumption in this logic regarding God's intentions. We get an insight into God's intentions from the these verses; 1 John 2:2 And he is the propitiation for our sins: and ...


2

Reformed churches are confessional bodies so the best place to start would probably be with those confessions. There are generally two camps: The English tradition uses the Westminster Confession of Faith: http://www.pcaac.org/resources/wcf/ The Continental tradition uses the 3 forms of unity - The Belgic Confession, The Canons of Dort and the Heidelberg ...


2

You state the problem as being that of justification from eternity; how can God be wrathful against the elect prior to their sins actually being expiated if he has decreed that they will be justified? You seem to want to know about when atonement is applied, for if it is applied only at the point they personally believe, then you see the application of ...


2

Study or Surmise ? Since my conversion at the age of sixteen, in 1967, I have noticed that many people comment on the Institutes of the Christian Religion who have not properly read them. And thereby comes much confusion and misunderstanding. Legal or Evangelical ? John Calvin makes it clear that he believes there are two kinds of repentance - a legal ...


1

This article compares the views of Augustine to those of John Owen on the question of the Perseverance of the Saints. http://johnowen.org/media/knapp_on_augustine_and_owen.pdf Augustine and Owen each believed that it is solely by God's grace that one is given the gift of perseverance to the end, and that is the defining characteristic of the elect. Each ...


1

Simple answer Everything is done with the foreknowledge of God, and He uses and works through all things to bring about His purposes. This means we act in free will and intend what we intend, but it is only God who brings the light of revelation and power. So in our perspective we take the steps that are before us, but they are there because God has ...


1

This is not my personal answer, as to what I believe, but rather what I am coming to understand about the difference in views with regard to the extent of the atonement. I found two excellent summaries. The first is in favor of the term 'limited atonement' and the concepts behind it. It is written from a "modern reformation" perspective which I ...


1

The Reformed understanding of the wages of sin being death is that the preeminent death we suffer is not physical, but rather spiritual. In Genesis 2:17, Adam was told "you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die." Yet when he ate of it, he did not immediately physically die. In the New ...


1

When I face this issue I think sometimes it’s just about semantics. For example, of course only those who are saved, Christ died for, because as He knew all men from eternity. He knew who He was dying for, in terms of actually providing real forgiveness to. However, with the hyper Calvinistic view (which I think you are referring to for Calvin did believe it)...


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