12

There are two facets to the answer, one regarding the nature of the sin offering itself, and one regarding Mary’s motivations for making the offering. In summary, in Israel, so-called “sin” offerings were offered for transgressions agains the ritual law, not so much for offenses against the moral law. Moreover, just as Jesus submitted himself to the ...


10

It is not about abortion, it's about Jealousy and the Lord acting as a witness in trials that otherwise had none. Note that the NIV is the only translation to use the word 'miscarriage' (see Numbers 5:22 in parallel to 18 other translations). The translators interpret 'Your thigh to rot' and 'to rot [your] thigh' as 'miscarriage'. Whereas the Hebrew for '...


7

The answer to your question is further on in the chapter. Hebrews 10:11-14 ESV And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God, waiting from that time until his enemies should be ...


7

Wikipedia gives a brief overview of how the commandment has generally been seen as "new." It accords with what I've heard through the years: The "New Commandment", the Wycliffe Bible Commentary states, "was new in that the love was to be exercised toward others not because they belonged to the same nation, but because they belonged to Christ...and the ...


7

The point was to give a concrete definition of "holiness" - namely that God was "set apart," i.e. holy, and God wanted his people to be "set apart" from the other nations. These vestigal practices mainly were a symbol of a greater concept - that as God's chosen people, they were to be different / separate from everyone else. The opposite of holiness is ...


7

From a Baptistic perspective, there is very little difference between the 10 commandments and the other 603 rules and regulations of the Torah. Note: I'm specifically not addressing the extent to which the law of Moses still applies, as it is well covered elsewhere While the 10 commandments are a succinct guide to right behavior, their popularity really ...


7

I find no reference to Leviticus 11:6 on the websites of the Vatican or the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). The USCCB does maintain on its website the text of the New American Bible (Revised Edition), or NABRE, which is the only translation approved for public liturgical use in the United States. The NABRE translates Leviticus 11:4–6: 4 ...


5

The Year of Jubilee Every 50 years, the Jews were required to return any land they had bought back to its original owners, as well as set all their slaves (who wanted to be freed) free. This is what Levicitus 25:10 is talking about. Hebrew slaves were already ordered to be freed every seventh year (Ex 21:2), for slavery among Hebrew brethren was always ...


5

When it comes to questions asking "Are there any Christians that do such-and-such" it's very hard to answer, because Christianity is a very diverse group and there are highly likely to be at least a few Christians that do almost anything. However in this case I'm going to go out on a limb and answer "No". Here are my reasons. The first part of Leviticus ...


5

That passage doesn't even say the woman was pregnant, yet pro-aborts use it to rationalize abortion! It shows how desperate they are -- as if they actually cared about what the Book of Numbers said. When people use that argument, just say, "You are welcome to show me in the Book of Numbers where it says the woman is pregnant (not there). Then you could ...


5

My understanding of cleanliness vs uncleanliness had to do with ability to participate in Jewish religious ceremonies. They were things which were not sinful, however when made unclean, would make one ineligible to participate in Holy ceremonies. The level of purification needed also scaled with the closeness to God, with a very large amount of ...


5

To my knowledge no serious theologian who doesn't believe in the immortality of the soul uses examples such as Lev 21:11 as proof-texts, so those who do (believe in the immortality of the soul) have not frequently felt the need to defend it on such a charge. Nevertheless, mainstream scholarship provides ample explanation of the lexical phenomenon. The claim ...


4

How did the old ceremonial sacrifices made atonement? They didn't. Old Testament sacrifice was only able to atone for someone who followed the Mosaic law perfectly... a feat which is beyond any of us, especially as most of us are not Jews, and even if we were the Altar and priests are gone. The whole point of Jesus' sacrifice is that the former sacrificial ...


4

The Old Testament Law (Genesis-Deuteronomy) was effectively the constitution of the Israelite nation. It told their history, established them as a nation state, and gave them laws to obey individually and as a whole nation. The core of the law is the Sinai/Deuteronomy covenants. God made a contract with them that he would be their God if they would be his ...


3

It was different. They looked at Jesus through the symbols and shadows of the sacrifice, nevertheless that is all they were symbols and shadows of the "Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world" John 1:29 They were forgiven on credit, while we look back to His sacrifice are forgiven as He now intercedes with us before the Father as the ...


3

Regarding having sex with a woman during her menstrual period, the topic is not addressed directly in the New Testament, and so the conclusion one draws about the matter depends largely on the method one uses to interpret the Old Testament. The Law of Moses There is not universal agreement about how to treat the Law of Moses. Some groups claim that it must ...


3

If you want to know what the passage "literally meant," we should start with a literal translation. After all "unaware of it" is a paraphrase. This is literal: Leviticus 5:4 KJV Or if a soul swear, pronouncing with his lips to do evil, or to do good, whatsoever it be that a man shall pronounce with an oath, and it be hid from him; when he knoweth of it, ...


3

I suspect not. For two reasons: The "goat upon which the Lord's lot fell" was still used as an offering. Barabbas was simply released. It makes more sense that Jesus is the type both of the sin offering and the scapegoat -- especially given how repetitively the sacrificial system prefigured the Messiah in many other aspects. This repeating imagery amounts ...


3

The answer to the first part of your question, appears to lie in the fact that only the Levites responded to Moses call for all who were on the Lord's side to come to him. It is also good to understand that not all who rebelled against God on that day were killed, which may answer your, second question about the added punishment which was meted out to all ...


3

"Holy" = "Set Apart (for a Special Purpose)" "Holy" (qodesh, 6944 קֹדֶשׁ ) means "set apart (for a special purpose)." Its synonyms, like "consecrated" and "sacred" mean the same thing. In the context of Leviticus 22:10, God is speaking of sacrifices. be careful with the holy gifts of the sons of Israel, which they dedicate to Me Many of the sacrifices ...


3

It is not the practice of the Catholic Church to have doctrines or precepts about particular Jewish Holy Days or celebrations. If the Church did, it would be easily found in the Catholic Encyclopedia. Here is what the Catholic Encyclopedia actually has to say about Yom Kippur. The rites to be observed on the Day of Atonement are fully set forth in the ...


3

No, Jesus is not 'lessening' the dietery law ('can but shouldn't'). He is explaining that it does not pertain to the New Covenant ('what you eat cannot be a sin intrinsically'). The Law The Law had several aspects, such as the ceremonial and dietary laws particular to the Jews as a nation (for the purpose of creating a nation humble under the rule of God, ...


3

I will give you a quick answer for this, because I feel for you in your state of confusion! this can be a tough predicament, but this is really no predicament at all, like most seeming "contradictions" in the Bible, the problem is with our understanding, and not with the Bible itself. A classic approach to attacking the Christian faith / Bible is to cherry ...


3

Numbers 23:19 says: God is not human, that he should lie, not a human being, that he should change his mind. Does he speak and then not act? Does he promise and not fulfill? Since He handed down the Ten Commandments, which includes "Thou shalt not commit murder," then he does not advocate murder. The important distinction is that the commandment does ...


3

Luke 2:24: And to offer a sacrifice, according as it is written in the law of the Lord, a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons: Venerable Bede commentates on this verse (quoted in St. Thomas Aquinas's Catena Aurea on Luke 2): Now this was the victim of the poor. For the Lord commanded in the law that they who were should offer a lamb for a son or ...


2

Ok here is my stab at this rather important question which goes deep into the Christian faith. Let me start with these verses: Romans 6:23 New King James Version (NKJV) For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 5:12 New King James Version (NKJV) Therefore, just as through one man sin ...


2

I would say the main thing to remember here when dealing with the Old Testament is that the wages for sin, no matter the sin according to God, was death. So I believe you answered your own question as to Why they were told to slay their brethren. That is was indeed to atone for the sins of the people. Now according to the passage I posted below it says that ...


2

The most obvious difference is that "Love one another" is a directive to those in the group, to respect those in the group, while "Love your neighbor" is a directive to love a larger number of people, not exclusively those in the group. One could be interpreted as internal, the other external.


2

From context, we get this command was given to Aaron and his descendants, those ordained for Priesthood. It mentions there these are considered "defects"; an imperfection. It's a symbol of sanctification; God setting apart, and also what is acceptable to God (perfection, purity, holiness). Similar to why sacrificial lambs are to be without blemish. Also why ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible