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13

The appropriate Canon law says: Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays [...] (emphasis mine). In other words, the rules say that the Archbishop has the authority to decide what can be eaten on Fridays in his diocese (he doesn't have to declare alligator to be 'seafood' - ...


12

The practice of Lent is hardly unique to the Catholic church. It pre-dates the major church schisms. The practice today involves somewhat different implementations in different traditions. Some are much more developed than others, but the general idea is the same. It is impossible to draw up a list of traditions which do or do not participate, because ...


11

"Meat" in this sense means, and has historically meant, what used to be called "flesh meat", which St. Thomas Aquinas described as "the flesh of animals that take their rest on the earth" [including birds, who rest in trees on the earth] (Summa Theologica, Second Part of the Second Part, Question 147, Article 8). Exceptions to the rule of "no meat on ...


9

Canon Law 1251 says: Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays [...] (emphasis mine). In other words it is to be determined by the bishops exactly what constitutes abstinence. The bishops of Quebec can simply state that beaver meat is OK to eat on days of abstinence. They don'...


8

The USCCB website has several questions and answers about Lenten observances. The last one of these is: Q. Are there exemptions other than for age from the requirement to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday? A. Those that are excused from fast and abstinence outside the age limits include the physically or mentally ill including individuals suffering ...


6

I think you may be confusing the terms a little. There's a simple solution to your question. Easter is the joyful celebration of Christ's resurrection. Lent is the forty-day* period leading up to Easter. It is a time of penitence and fasting. Many Christians observing the Western-style liturgical calendar (this probably includes your friend) fast in some ...


6

The website liturgies.net appears to have a full copy of the Roman Missal, including the propers of the Mass for Ash Wednesday. This states: [The priest] sprinkles the ashes with holy water, without saying anything. Then the Priest places ashes on the head of all those present who come to him, and says to each one: Paenitemini, et credite ...


5

I would suggest that most of this comes from imitation of Catholic traditions. The Catholic Church has a rich tradition of symbolism, and included in that tradition is the use of vestment colors. Liturgical colors have reference in Biblical traditions, however...the only color worn by clergy until the 4th century was white. The first mention of different ...


5

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has a Q&A about Lenten practices that addressed this very question, which also describes a world-wide Catholic view: Q. I understand that all the Fridays of Lent are days of abstinence from meat, but I'm not sure what is classified as meat. Does meat include chicken and dairy products? A. Abstinence ...


5

For those who may follow the Mozarabic Rite (at least in the old form) which starts Lent on the Monday following the First Sunday of Lent. There are some priests that still use the Mozarabic Rite which is also called the Visigothic Rite or the Hispanic Rite. Ash Wednesday (Feria quarta in capite jejunii) is an evident late Roman borrowing, rather clumsily ...


5

As I stated in an answer to a related question, historically it has been the case that during Lent, and perhaps during some other times, required abstinence from meat has included not only abstinence from meat products but also abstinence from any animal products, including dairy, fat, and eggs. Thus, it has historically been the case that between Ash ...


5

The Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches codifies common portions of the canon law of all the Eastern Catholic Churches within the (Roman) Catholic Church. Canon 883 says The Christian faithful who are outside the territorial boundaries of their own Church sui juris can adopt fully for themselves the feast days and days of penance which are in force ...


5

In the rhyme quoted: Tid, Mid, Misera, Carl, Paum, Good Pose-Day the Carl, Paum and Good Pose-Day refer to the 5th Sunday in Lent (14 days before Easter), the 6th Sunday in lent(7 days before Easter) and Easter Day itself. Carl Sunday or Carling Sunday is more commonly called Passion Sunday, the first day of the two-week season of Passiontide. It is ...


4

It's traditionally known as Shrove Tuesday, but is known by a few names: Pancake Tuesday Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday probably more besides The day is most definitely a tradition of Catholics and some other ecclesial bodies who observe Lent. It is a feast day, a day of fattening before fasting for forty days. Sadly, the occasion has been abused, especially in ...


4

In the previous century Laws concerning Fasting and Abstinence have changed considerably and at different intervals. Pope St John XXIII altered the rules for fasting and abstinence in 1966 with his Apostolic Constitution PAENITEMINI. II. 1. The time of Lent preserves its penitential character. The days of penitence to be observed under obligation ...


4

The Names of the Individual Sundays of Lent According to the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, the Sundays of Lent are known as the following: First Sunday of Lent: Quadragesima Sunday or Invocavit Sunday Second Sunday of Lent: Reminiscere Sunday Third Sunday of Lent: Oculi Sunday Fourth Sunday of Lent: Laetare Sunday and/or Mothering Sunday (Some people ...


4

There is nothing about Lent observance that requires it to be public. My experience is very different from yours, and most people keep their Lent observances very private. I don't know what anyone is doing for Lent except for my immediate family (I have deduced one person's Lent observance, but even then it was something they kept as private as possible.) ...


4

How is Lent observance reconciled with Matthew 6:16-18? Lent can be as private as on wishes. The public nature of Lent observance is generally limited the liturgical days of Ash Wednesday and other liturgical days in Lent. Our individual practices can and should remain between ourselves and God. Apart from the only two days in which fasting and abstinence ...


3

I know very little about the Orthodox church, but I am familiar with Lenten practices of other churches. Lent is not a time for giving up things which are sinful. Things which are sinful are bad for you, and should be 'given up' all the time. In other words if movies (or music) 'perpetuate sinful activity', then they should be avoided at all times, not ...


3

For Syro Malabar Rite the lent starts on the Monday before the Ash Wedenesday. This day is called Clean Monday . In general Eastern Catholic Churches have Lent starting on Clean Monday.


3

Why does any Archbishop get to decide if alligator is okay for Lent? When he officially gets the go ahead for the conference of Bishops in a particular region or country to do so, the USCCB in this case. First of all this is a question of Church discipline and not Church doctrine. A second point is that it deals with the local church only at the regional ...


3

is the intention to add fish to the diet or to remove all other meats from the diet? The answer is "Neither". The intention is to remind you of your need for, and dependence on God. Abstaining from meat is a specific example of the teaching on Abstinence. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains the purpose of abstinence in general as follows: Inasmuch as ...


3

Richard Foster identifies 6 traditions of the church: Contempative Holiness Charismatic Social Justice Evangelical Incarnational Of these, the traditional Lent celebration is most likely to be practiced by Christians who identify with holiness or who pursue "an ever fuller life of sacrificial, self-giving love". According to the gospels, Jesus began his ...


3

In our present liturgy for Ash Wednesday, we use ashes made from the burned palm branches distributed on the Palm Sunday of the previous year. The priest blesses the ashes and imposes them on the foreheads of the faithful, making the sign of the cross and saying, “Remember, man you are dust and to dust you shall return,” or “Turn away from sin and be ...


3

What are the fundamental motivations of the "Lenten Practices"? Not all denominations observe Lent! There are a few fundamental motivations for partaking in the Lenten observation. Preparation spiritually for celebrating the sacred paschal mysteries of Christ’s Passion, Death and Resurrection. Imitating Our Lord Jesus Christ who gave us the example of how ...


2

As DJClayworth wrote, nowadays it's not a strict rule what you can eat in lent. But in Middle Ages, there were strict rules about it. All fish were allowed. But fish were not defined as today, but as "all water animals", including a beaver or a capybara. Molluscs were permitted too - thats why monks (some order had to fast for most of the year as others ...


2

This page (Lent 101 from the UMC) gives a guide to Lent from a Methodist perspective. It is very similar to other protestant traditions. Lent is a time for fasting and prayer, but fasting means different things to different people/denominations. From the page I linked to above: FASTING: Some people have been known to go without food for days. But ...


2

I'm Catholic, but I don't know what a Maronit is. One thing about fasting that people often forget is the reason we do it in the first place. If you just do it because it is the rules, it will not benefit you at all. Sundays and feast days are not actually part of Lent, so you don't have to fast. I have not heard anything about not drinking water. I would ...


2

In the Catholic Church there are only two days of fasting in modern times: Ash Wednesday and Good Friday are obligatory days of fasting and abstinence for Catholics. In addition, Fridays during Lent are obligatory days of abstinence. For members of the Latin Catholic Church, the norms on fasting are obligatory from age 18 until age 59. When fasting, ...


2

In Orthodox Christianity, fasting is vegan (no meat, no dairy, no egg, basically nothing of animal origin). And no alcohol (that means avoiding vinegar, as well). Monks and nuns (and some of the more fervent Christians) do it the proper, old way - vegan and without using oil (like olive or sunflower oil, for example). Another aspect to take in ...


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