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11

There are two ways to approach that commandment. Either it is absolute or it is relative: it can either refer to all of human life, or some subset of human life. Clearly it cannot be the former as the Torah also allows for the death penalty (before anyone tries to argue, "but Christ says..." or "but the woman caught in adultery..." I will counter that the ...


11

This is a parable, so the fact that "a man of noble birth" is third person is rather irrelevant. It's pretty obvious he's symbolizing someone, probably Jesus. Context. Verse 11 reads: As they heard these things, he proceeded to tell a parable, because he was near to Jerusalem, and because they supposed that the kingdom of God was to appear immediately. I ...


10

This question is about authority. It is wrong for you to discipline children unless you are their parent, or their teacher, or their sports coach etc. The relationship you have determines what authority you have over someone. As our creator, God has complete authority over everyone. It is entirely right for him to kill any creature he made at any time for ...


6

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has useful information on how we should treat the animals. [2416] Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory. Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. ...


5

While God did command nations to kill, it's important to remember that he never commanded individuals to kill devoid of their representing a nation. So no, I don't think you could say that it is legit for any single individual to claim that God commanded them to kill. On the contrary, one of the ten commandments is, "You shall not murder." (Exodus 20:13)....


5

That is a very good question! Like you, those of us in the historic peace churches do not believe that Jesus' death can or should be avenged by violence. After all, it was Jesus himself who said that vengeance belonged to him alone. And if we were to avenge his death, who is guilty? Rather, who is not guilty? If we really believe that Jesus died for our ...


5

Nnowhere in scripture, or any Christian theology that I know of, are Christians commanded to avenge Christ's killing. In fact there is good evidence to say that God opposes it: "'Vengence is mine', sayeth the Lord". So any Christians who are taking revenge on any group because they believe them to be responsible for Jesus' death are not acting according to ...


5

You are probably thinking of Elijah, as recounted in 1 Kings 19. It occurs right after Elijah's 'competition' with the prophets of Baal, and also includes the "still small voice" of God. The Catholic Church prescribes this passage, 1 Kings 19:4–8, as the first reading for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle B, which in 2015 fell on August 9th&...


5

Personally, I think that the primary difference is that the New Testament "gives to Caesar that which is Caesar's and to God that which is God's". There is, in essence, in the Christian faith, a separation from what is legal and what is right in faith in Christ. Whereas the Old Testament is both the law of God (those things that an individual should or ...


4

Reading the whole chapter in context tells a different story Also remember that the Bible wasn't written in English. The presumption of "innocence" on the part of those taunting the prophet Elisha is at odds with the narrative as presented. The prophet is speaking on God's behalf: this is serious business As explained in some detail at this biblical ...


3

I don't have a full answer but I think few words can help... Why parents forbid children from doing things they themselves do ? They know more. Why God forbids killing but killed people ? He knows these persons more than humans do. He knows their thoughts and more, so his judgement is the best for his plans. But we don't know everything there's to know ...


2

It is a stretch to call the "retaliation" you mention a response to Jesus' murder. It is more accurately described as a response to differing belief systems, oppression of belief, etc. It is also widely accepted that early Christians were at least themselves convinced that Jesus physically resurrected, so it would take a lot more than psychology based ...


2

Exodus 20:13 (NIV) “You shall not murder. Exodus 20:13 (KJV) Thou shalt not kill. The meaning* of the Hebrew word for "kill/murder" used in this verse has a wide range of meanings as explained in this article. The act of killing in a warfare is not what this 6th commandment means. The commands for the killings in the Old Testament had proper reasons. ...


2

One think we must know is " God will not act wickedly" - Job 34:12 (Sorry i'm not eloquent in English) actually GOD killed those nations because of their iniquity (Genesis 15:16, Deuteronomy 32:43, Genesis 13:13) and what Korah did was to rises against GOD (Numbers 16:11). And GOD is the ruler and Creator of us All and HE has to do justice (Romans 12:19) ...


2

In addition to Mawia's quotes from the Catechism, there is also the pithy summary: 2457 Animals are entrusted to man's stewardship; he must show them kindness. They may be used to serve the just satisfaction of man's needs.


2

The implication of Numbers 4:15 is that God forbids non-priests from touching holy things like the Ark of the Covenant. Apparently, God killed Uzzah because he, not being a priest, touched a holy thing contrary to God's commandment.


2

An excellent question, and one that I've pondered myself in the past. A pastor I knew once actually gave a sermon on the issue. His explanation paraphrased is that Uzzah thought that the ark touching him would not sully it, while it touching the ground would. Uzzah's actions, though seemingly innocuous enough, stemmed from a fundamental misunderstanding ...


2

The ten plagues corresponded to ten of the major Gods of the Egyptians. The God of the Hebrews wasn't trying to convert anyone, but assert himself as the God above all other gods. 1) God of the Nile, Osiris & Hapi? Your river is blood. 2) Frog-Goddess of Fertility, Heka? You get frogs, you get frogs, everybody gets frogs. 3 & 4) Geb, the god of ...


2

Your question starts with a couple of assumptions that don't hold up. First, the earliest Christians had plenty of heated disagreements, starting with doctrinal conflicts over the extent to which the Law of Moses was binding (or not) on Gentile believers. Chapter 15 of Acts, and the whole of Paul's letter to the church at Galatia, record those issues. ...


1

Your question about Elisha and the curse called down upon his taunters in the name of YHWH has been fully answered by Korvin Starmast. With regard to the fig tree cursed by Jesus (Mark 11:12-14; 20-21) there is more to this than at first might be obvious. This event took place at Passover, on the Monday of Passion Week. It was not the season for figs. Fig-...


1

We mustn’t read more into the text than the Bible allows. The Bible reveals Uzzah’s physical death the Bible does not reveal his eternal outcome. He may have passed into the presence of the Lord. The Arc of the Covenant was the dwelling place of God; Uzzah’s error was attempting to save God by steadying the arc. God is the Savior of mankind not the ...


1

There seems to be a great misunderstanding here. There is no difference in the punishment between the Old and New Testaments. The differences are only in the immediacy of imposing punishment, and who makes that judgment. AS far as the immediacy goes; we are given the parable of the tares, by Jesus himself to illustrate that judgment is delayed, because the ...


1

The old testament and the new testament take radically different approaches to righteousness. The Old Testament set up a Law which must be followed to live a perfect life and be saved. It set an impossible standard which could not be met. It also sought to isolate Israel from corruption by removing those who would have influences that would take them away ...


1

Thou shalt not kill. As mentioned by others, "kill" is "murder". I am perhaps straying a bit around, and outside the scope of the question, but you might find some of the essence useful. Beware of some doom and gloom ;) In short, it is God's prerogative to end a life, not man. Though I do not say God murder, the commandment is set ...


1

The simplest answer would be derived from the choice of words used: Thou shall not ........ (Emphasis mine) The prohibition applies to man not God since here God is the One speaking to man.


1

In the Old Testament, when God ordered the Israelites to kill various groups of people, the people being killed were always under judgement from God for their sins. The Canaanites were particularly evil people who practiced idolatry, including brutal infant sacrifices. As such, it could be argued that the people were guilty under the law and therefore, ...


1

One thing to consider is the different role of the individual vs. the role as an agent of the State. With a notable exception of Abraham and Isaac (and maybe some others I can't think of) the specific command to kill an individual or obliterate a nation, etc. seems to be given to a representative agent of the State as the agent of the State. Also, bear in ...


1

My opinion on the matter is based on 2 assumptions: We are humans and we have a tendency to misunderstand events. Knowledge of Jesus' death is very widespread. With these two assumptions in mind, my opinion is almost guessable... As a Christian I believe that Jesus died for my sins, because of my sins; if we were sinless, Jesus would have died for nothing....


1

Exodus 20:13 does mean Thou shalt not Kill. But this only applies for moral reasons. This doesn't apply against wicked reasons and self defense. God ejected Canaanites out of their land through Israelites, because of their wickedness (Leviticus 18:24-28, Deuteronomy 9:4-5). David Kills Goliath in 1 Samuel 17. David Killed Goliath, because Philistines ...


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