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14

According to the doctrine of the Trinity, Jesus being the Son of God means that He is fully God made manifest in human form (John 1:14). Jesus is simultaneously both fully God and fully man. As such, Jesus' crucifixion wasn't God sending someone else to be punished, but instead God taking the punishment Himself. This, therefore, does not compromise God's ...


11

There are three common landing points that most believers fall into: (personally I progressed in my own thoughts along all three and don’t think its of absolute importance as to which place a person is at). In all three positions the love of God for all humanity is usually not doubted. Its not really a big issue. Some may think that the gospel is somehow ...


9

Sometimes, God's Punishment for Disobedience is Death. This is a simple fact. The severity of the punishment often corresponds to the severity of the offense, so why was this offense so severe? The text doesn't say this explicitly, but if we assume that God could have sufficient justification for execution, then it's likely that he was knowingly and ...


9

The Wesleyan Arminians recognised the problem implied by your analogy and resolved it by proffering the Governmental Theory of Atonement. Applying this resolution to your analogy Christ has 'made' the payment at the cross - and He can't unmake the payment because the cost to Him was real) - but rather than a completed individual transaction on behalf of ...


8

From the Recapitulatio of Fr. Réginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.'s De Virtutibus Theologicis (p. 20), a commentary on St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica II-II, he gives the following categorization of the virtues (virtutes), following the organization of St. Thomas's treatment of the virtues in his Summa: Here's a rough translation: The Virtues ...


7

Comparing the representative democracy of America with the kingdom of God is an unparalleled category error. The entire reason American jurisprudence holds a person innocent until proven guilty is because we assume that we are not privy, at the outset, to all of the pertinent facts. You may accept this or not but the Scripture declares that God knows the ...


6

In other words, a person is declared righteous despite being a sinner, and remain an ungodly sinner, but God overlooks justice for him and let him go. Is it acceptable if we characterize this as a false justification or forged justification - contrary to fact? As if a forged document of righteousness is given by God? No, the Protestant doctrine of forensic ...


5

From a Christian perspective, your question contains two erroneous premises: first that every person will be saved (universal salvation) and second that “Jesus descended into the deepest depths of Hell to endure further ineffable tortures.” According to the Bible, only those persons who come to saving faith in Christ Jesus will be saved. God is certainly ...


5

St. Thomas Aquinas (Catholic perspecitve) tells us that within God, all His 'attributes' have to be, within Himself, identical. Due to divine simplicity. Here are my personal thoughts, as a Catholic, in contemplating these two sides of God: the just and the merciful. I think the issue of the relationship between love and justice. Firstly, love is to want ...


5

Because God judges our hearts The man was not punished just for picking up sticks. He was punished for putting a higher value on work and self-sufficiency than on honoring the Holy Sabbath. It just so happened that his indifference towards God was played out by picking up sticks. Exodus 31:13 ESV You are to speak to the people of Israel and say, ‘Above ...


5

All salvation is inherently unjust. No one deserves salvation. Eph 2:1-9 (NASB) And you were dead in your trespasses and sins, in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit that is now working in the sons of disobedience. Among them we too all formerly lived in the ...


5

Firstly, we need to know that God is just and fair. God is just: He will pay back trouble to those who trouble you. (2 Thessalonians 1:6, NIV) But you are stubborn and refuse to turn to God. So you are making things even worse for yourselves on that day when he will show how angry he is and will judge the world with fairness. (Romans 2:5, ...


5

For all have sinned.... The first part of the answer is that in the absence of Christ's death on the cross, justice demands that all humanity suffer eternal torment because of our sins. Thus fairness would be universal damnation. So the salvation of even one person is not fair, it is grace. This point is driven home by Paul in Romans. This article discusses ...


4

The sin is a damage we do to ourselves. Adam and Eve damaged themselves and we inherited this sin, like child inherits damage if his mother smokes or drinks alcohol during pregnancy.


4

I write from a reformed, Calvinist point of view which includes three things: I believe in the complete sovereignty of God in all things, he does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth (Isaiah 46:9-10; Daniel 4:35, 5:21); and I believe in the responsibility of man, that man is solely to be blamed for all his sins including for his rejection of Christ; ...


4

I'm just going to assume this question is on-topic and answer accordingly. This results in assuming certain other things to be a certain way because changing them renders the question off-topic. Thus, point 1: A person is only called to answer to what he knows. This has actually been debated through the ages as to whether or not it is true; with some rather ...


4

The question is similar to Abrahams appeal to the lost in Sodom. Abraham does not want God to destroy the whole city but pleads for mercy: Then Abraham approached him and said: “Will you sweep away the righteous with the wicked? What if there are fifty righteous people in the city? Will you really sweep it away and not spare the place for the sake of the ...


3

This is certainly a challenging question. I'll rely on the writings of two prominent reformed theologians, Louis Berkhof and Charles Hodge, who are strong supporters of this doctrine. It's important to note, for reasons that will become clear, that they defend their position in the face of arguments made by opponents who believe in a just God. Those who ...


3

The Bible has many examples of carrying out God's commands despite opposition from secular, or even religious authorities. For example, Daniel and his fellow exiles were ordered not to worship God by those in authority, but continued to do so. In Acts 4, Peter and John were forbidden to preach and heal, yet continued to do so. They specifically said: “...


3

It is contrary to human reason for the Judge of all the Earth to exact legal (forensic) punishment on one who volunteered to be punished in the stead of many criminals. Especially as that volunteer was the very Son of God, utterly sinless in and of himself. There is legal punishment for crimes. That is one thing. There is righteousness manifested in carrying ...


2

Your question seems to be different than what your references convey. In Isaiah chapter 13 and most of chapter 14 Isaiah is warning Babylon not of God striking the Nation, but of the coming overthrow by the Medes and the Persians. He is telling them that unless they change their ways God will not interfere on their behalf. Isaiah 13:17 KJV Behold, I ...


2

Why did God kill a man for picking up sticks on the Sabbath? Perhaps we can start by asking a few questions to get a broader understanding of what might be going on here. What is the Sabbath? The Sabbath is a day of rest. God established the pattern of the week at creation, blessing the seventh day and making it holy "because on it God rested from all his ...


2

No, there's not a specific Christian definition for this phrase. It means various things to different people based on their own values. The defiition, in general is the same as it is in the secular world - to champion social causes that are considered "Just". Beyond that, it gets into "What's 'Just'?". Put simply, there's no "Specific Christian ...


2

I have to agree with DJClayworth in that I'm not sure which verse(s) you're referring to from Leviticus 20 have been associated with which modern law(s), but I did want to try and help answer the question you have to the best of my knowledge. As a quick intro, many people (even the staunchly devout) have misjudged the Old Testament as being just a ...


2

As curiousdannii commented, "The cosmic child abuse argument is usually leveled against penal substitutionary atonement believers, not universalists." For clarity, it would be best to leave out all universal salvation ideas, for that is not necessary to give an answer. The bare bones of the question remain as: "the father sent his son to be ...


2

Original sin is not so much an action of a person, but rather a position into which one is born. As such, the idea of justice (merit of reward or punishment) does not even enter the equation in understanding original sin. But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely ...


2

The word is τάχος Strong 5034 which Thayer (see the link for Strong) renders as 'quickness' or 'speed'. So in the construction used in verse 8, ἐν τάχει, Thayer tells us that the meaning is quickly or shortly (as in Acts 12:7; Acts 22:18; Romans 16:20) or it may mean speedily or soon (as in Luke 18:8; 1 Timothy 3:14 ; Revelation 1:1; Revelation 22:6). Thus ...


1

I tend to think about this objection in a few different ways. Firstly, the Son isn't really like the biological child of God. It's not if you were to give birth and send your son to the cross to be sacrificed. A better way to think of the crucifixion is God making a reverse sacrifice. I don't remember where I read this, but someone made the point that the ...


1

How was it loving for God to torture his own son? God didn't torture His own Son. We did. How was it just/fair for Jesus to take the punishment that we deserve? It wasn't fair, but it was God's demonstration of love. Humanity was cursed for our sin which resulted in the consequence of death. Jesus took that curse upon Himself, on our behalf, which ...


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