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We don't know The Bible doesn't tell us. The only answer I can give is a tautology - if they were saved, then they went to heaven. But the Bible doesn't tell us whether they were saved. However, it should be noted that the nature of their punishment does not rule out the possibility of their salvation. Consider 1 Corinthians 5:1-5 (NASB): It is ...


18

I believe the best way to address your question is to take apart what you've written, and address it piece by piece, looking especially at the assumptions you have made going into your argument. Please understand that while you may not agree with many of the statements I will make here, they do represent a Christian perspective. In particular, I will be ...


18

The word "generation" there in Greek is γενεα (genea), which can also refer to a family, stock, nation. (Strongs, definition 2b) The NASB also has a footnote here next to "generation" saying "Or race". I've always interpreted it, therefore, as meaning that the Jewish people will continue to exist until the second coming. Another form of the same word, ...


18

That is because Jesus gave Peter the keys to heaven and earth (Matthew 16:19). Not keys to hell. In other words, Peter (and his successors) can bind and loose on earth and heaven (Matthew 18:18) not in hell. They do not have authority on beings outside of the church. And people in hell are outside of the Church. P.S: Christ alone has the keys to hell (...


17

God does not condone rape in the Bible. This is a commonly raised objection to Christianity that's been answered ad-nauseum on apologetics websites, such as this one: http://www.rationalchristianity.net/numbers31.html Quote from the linked post: Weren't the virgin women raped? There are two parts to this objection: did God instruct or permit the ...


17

This view is based primarily on Matthew 16:18–19, in which Jesus says: And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. 19 I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in ...


11

Neither. You're asking the wrong question. Earthly and fallable court systems work one way. As omniscient maker of the universe and its sovereign King, God is not required to work quite the same way. We use the imagery of a courtroom to talk about the last judgement, but it is just imagery. The actual proceedings are a little different. For one thing, ...


11

The mainstream Christian answer is that there is no chance for repentance after death. The Scripture used to support this is Hebrews 9:27 which says And just as it is appointed for man to die once, and after that comes judgment The protestant answer goes further saying this: (From http://www.gotquestions.org/second-chance-salvation.html) While the ...


11

The idea of Peter at the gates of heaven with the keys has a long history that is sourced to the bible. Of course, as things go, sourcing alone and understanding the source may be two different things. Here is an example of the teaching in the 7th century at the Synod of Whitby over the argument about the Easter observance. (bold mine) The controversy [...


8

To preserve the sanctity of life Genesis 9:6 Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man. The Lord commands that those who commit certain sins must die because they have despised those made in His own image. It's also worth noting that one of the reasons for the flood (where all but 8 were killed) was ...


8

The various prophetic references are just that: prophecies. God is saying that if the people don't live right, they will be weakened as a nation and calamities will come upon them, including invasion by foreign nations that will do horrible things to them. God isn't saying that it's good or that it's right, simply that that is what will end up happening. ...


8

I'm trying not to give an answer that's purely a quote from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, but the matter is discussed so well there that there isn't much I feel I can add to it: 816 "The sole Church of Christ [is that] which our Savior, after his Resurrection, entrusted to Peter’s pastoral care, commissioning him and the other apostles to extend ...


7

Sometimes we may be quick to judge another brother, not knowing exactly what they mean, so I will not argue for or against this quote, but I will show a way that it is not true, and a way that it could be true. In contrast, if it is implied that God, or the saints, rejoice in the destruction of sinners, that cannot be true. Do I take any pleasure in the ...


7

Let's start with Matthew 25:31-46 where Jesus talks about Judgement Day whereon He will separate the sheep from the goats, casting the goats into Hell. In Romans 12:18-20, Paul cites the extant scriptures for why Christians should not take their own vengeance: If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men. Never take your own revenge,...


7

Catholics don't believe in a second chance doctrine, as you phrased it. But some do believe that Jesus can come to you at the very last second of your life. St. Faustina continually was visited by Jesus in dreams wherein she came to learn that God's greatest attribute it His Divine Mercy. One thing alone is necessary: that the sinner set ajar the door ...


7

The Bible "stories" teach us about the nature of God. They sometimes serve as a warning and other times they encourage a closer relationship with God. These stories are not casual happenings; they are recorded in the Bible as an everlasting message to God’s children. So in the case of Uzza, the Ark is the presence of God on Earth. When Uzza reached out ...


7

You made the classic mistake people make when they question Jesus' love: they make him a one-dimensional person. So when someone says that God is love, then asks, "then why would God ...," they are assuming that God should respond only in love -- to everything. In the case of sentencing people to hell, Jesus would be acting in the role of judge. Human ...


6

"If a man happens to meet a virgin who is not pledged to be married and rapes her and they are discovered, he shall pay the girl's father fifty shekels of silver. He must marry the girl, for he has violated her. He can never divorce her as long as he lives." Deuteronomy 22:28-29 NIV Does not seem like condoning it at all It may not be in the passage ...


6

Yes everyone will be judged: 2 Corinthians 5:10 New King James Version (NKJV) - For we must ALL appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive the things done in the body, according to what he has done, whether good or bad. but not all will be condemned: Romans 8:1 New King James Version (NKJV) - There is therefore now no ...


6

People are not condemned, judged, or punished because they do not have faith in Jesus. They are condemned because of the evil acts they have committed during their life on Earth. They are saved from punishment by faith in Jesus, and (depending on your view on justification by faith alone or with works) by those works of righteousness that spring from that ...


6

According the Catechism of the Catholic Church Since Christ died for all, and since all men are in fact called to one and the same destiny, which is divine, we must hold that the Holy Spirit offers to all the possibility of being made partakers, in a way known to God, of the Paschal mystery." Every man who is ignorant of the Gospel of Christ and ...


6

TL;DR Important due to both Particular Judgment and Purgatory The form of the question. Aren't we supposed to be judged by our whole life and not just what happens at the hour of our death? Should our whole eternity be based on what we did at the hour of death and pretend like our whole earthly life didn't matter? As my answer will show, that isn't how ...


5

It sounds like you're referring to the White Throne Judgment and the Bema Seat Judgment, which are typically believed to be different judgments by Evangelical Protestants. The White Throne Judgment is described in Revelation 20:11-15. This, to the traditions that believe in the two judgments, is the judgment that everyone faces, where you are judged to be ...


5

See the verse in sequence with the previous verses to place it in its plainest context: In verses 29-31, Jesus is talking about the tribulation of those days, the stars falling, His return, and the angels. This is to answer the portion of disciple's question in Matt. 24:3, "What will be the sign of Your coming, and of the end of the age?" In verses 29-31, ...


5

Romans 1:21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and reptiles. ...


5

This question strikes at the core of LDS doctrine - Christ's Atonement. Excuse my hyper-compulsive inlining of scripture references in my answer, but this is one of my favorite topics. I hope the reader will read the full text of the chapters I cite, as they explain it way better than I ever could. The purpose of the final judgment is to be brought back ...


5

When we put several passages together to get a fuller picture, we can see in what sense "overlook" is being used. Consider the following two verses, which are similar in scope (from the NET translation): Rom. 3:25 God publicly displayed him at his death as the mercy seat accessible through faith. This was to demonstrate his righteousness, because God ...


4

If Moses had said: "Okay, go ahead", would God have done it? You can take a look at the narrative of Abraham and Sodom (Genesis 18:16-33) as an example of this opposite case. Abraham, of course, doesn't say "Okay, go ahead and destroy Sodom"—but he doesn't ask for mercy either. His intercession is based on justice instead: it would be unjust, he argues, ...


4

The only place in the Bible where any sin is mentioned as being unforgivable is in Matthew 12: Matthew 12:31-32 (NLT) 31 “So I tell you, every sin and blasphemy can be forgiven—except blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, which will never be forgiven. 32 Anyone who speaks against the Son of Man can be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit ...


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