12

I think it's necessary to separate this question into two parts: Why did Judas need to lead the mob to Jesus? and Why did Judas need to kiss Jesus to identify him? I will attempt to answer the first question. Some possible explanations for the second question can be found here: https://hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/16864/why-did-judas-betray-...


10

Here are some things to help clarify this situation. First, "his disciples" does not always refer to the Twelve. It can refer to a much larger number, including "the seventy" who Jesus sends out to spread the message. Matthew in particular usually refers to "The Twelve" or "the Apostles" when he is talking about the smaller group and "the disciples" can ...


8

In Hebrew culture, thirty pieces of silver was the price paid to the master of a slave if his slave was gored by an ox: “If the ox gores a slave, male or female, the owner shall give to their master thirty shekels of silver, and the ox shall be stoned” (Exodus 21:32). A prophetic reference to the thirty pieces of silver given to Judas Iscariot is found in ...


7

I identify as an evangelical universalist. I don't know if you'll find this worthwhile, but here's my take. It sounds an awful lot like a figure of speech to me. If it is, it's best not to draw too many conclusions based on it. (Bart Ehrman left the faith because the mustard seed isn't really the smallest of all seeds.) In support of the figure of speech ...


6

I think I can add some useful informations in the subject of Judas death. Except of what is recorded in the New Testament, there are also other accoutns which may clear up potential consufion, remove contradictions and even propose entirely new view on the whole case of Judas death. In my opinion, they contain answer to question posted by OP: Are these two ...


5

This may be difficult to ascertain with any great degree of certainty, but we may be able to get close. The Time of Betrayal If, by the "moment of betrayal", you are referring to the Judas' kiss, then there are a few things we know. We know the disciples were having a hard time staying awake even during the first time Jesus went away to pray, and Jesus ...


4

Tradition says Jesus was betrayed late Thursday night, was crucified and buried before sundown on Friday. Jesus went to the garden of Gethsemane late in the evening, and prayed there for some time. A reasonable guess would be that it was Midnight to 2 AM by the time Judas led the soldiers there to arrest Jesus. Mark 15:25 says it was "the third hour" when ...


4

Matthew 27:3 says that the impetus for Judas' suicide was seeing him be condemned, rather than seeing him being executed or anything else. Jesus' interactions with Pilate, including the possibility of his being freed, are narrated afterwards. Although the gospels do jump forwards and back in time, I take the explicit description of Judas' remorse being ...


4

Judas' moral state becomes clear with the later disclosure by John that Judas was stealing and, by that theft, was depriving others of much needed charitable contributions.This deliberate moral state - the repeated act of theft - needs to be considered in juxtaposition to the stated question, as it paved the way for Satan's entrance. Judas had not been ...


4

And concerning the resurrection of the dead, have you not read that which was spoken by God, saying to you: I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob? He is not the God of the dead, but of the living. Matthew 22:31-32 Jesus is affirming that he believes in the God of the Jewish patriarchs, Holy men and prophets not the religion of ...


4

As you have already noted in your reading, there is no biblical basis for Judas Iscariot as a wealthy landowner, at least prior to purchasing the field, as he does in Acts of the Apostles. Contrary evidence is found in John 12:6, since a wealthy landowner would scarcely need to be a petty thief: John 12:6 (NIV): He did not say this because he cared ...


3

Keep in mind that this event coincided with the Passover. There would have been many people in Jerusalem. Finding one person was not an easy task. There also would have been many rabbis, each with dozens of followers/disciples. Even if the Jewish leaders what Jesus looked like, and where he was (and how could they know his precise location without some ...


3

I also identify as an evangelical universalist and would echo Tim's answer here regarding the context of stillbirth. I thought I'd also add an excerpt from George Macdonald (19th-century Scottish author, poet, Christian minister; spiritual mentor of C.S. Lewis) related to this question, as he is a figure many/most evangelical universalists resonate with. ...


3

It is difficult to believe that Judas Iscariot would not have known the priests intended to have Jesus killed. After all, their willingness to pay thirty silver coins, a small fortune at a time when peasants generally only used the lesser bronze coins, was clear evidence of foul intent. However, Matthew's Gospel portrays Judas as suffering considerable ...


3

The best answer comes Scripturally. Today, the painters of the Middle Ages have given us a picture of Jesus as a grand, handsome man. In fact, the Bible tells us the opposite - Jesus was very plain and normal looking. Let's look at some verses to support this. Emphasis added. Isaiah 53:2 (ESV) tells us the Messiah wouldn't be "beautiful" on the ...


2

While it is true that these verses are of the same event, the question is why this portrayal? The answer explains to so-called contradiction. Judas hung himself (Mt. 27:5). He fell and split with bowels gushing out (Acts 1:18). What's it mean? The answer begins in Deuteronomy. And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death, and he be to be put to ...


2

Is Judas in Heaven? We don't know. What are the chances that Judas is in Hell? Very high because of these verses. The Son of Man will go just as it is written about him. But woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born." (Matthew 26:24, NIV) While I was with them, I protected them and kept them ...


2

The betrayal by Judas appears in chapter 26 of the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 14 of Mark, and chapter 22 of Luke. In all three the decision of Judas is portrayed rather suddenly. Matthew and Mark move straight from the story of Jesus' anointing at Bethany to the story of the betrayal: "Amen, I say to you, wherever this gospel is proclaimed in the whole ...


2

I have heard from several old parishioners at my Roman Catholic church that St. James (the greater) was so visually similar to his cousin Jesus that only people very close to them could tell the difference between the two, and thus the kiss of Judas was necessary to identify the correct man. I can't find any corroborating sources online, but I've heard this ...


2

Jesus' public ministry most likely lasted about three years (see "How long was Jesus's ministry?"). He called his twelve closest disciples, including Judas, toward the beginning of that three year period (see Mark 3:13-19; Luke 6:12-16), and Judas betrayed him at the end of it. It's possible that Jesus knew Judas for an extended time before he called him as ...


2

Did Judas Iscariot participate in the First Holy Eucharist? The short answer seems to be yes. Does the Catholic Church categorically teach that Judas Iscariot participated in the First Eucharist instituted by Jesus at the Last Supper? The short answer is that there is room to doubt, but the Church tends to think that Judas Iscariot was present, St. Thomas ...


2

Is Judas in hell for eternity? No one knows for sure if Judas is in hell for eternity. One thing is for sure, Our Lord himself had strong words about Judas Iscariot: Jesus replied, “The one who has dipped his hand into the bowl with me will betray me. The Son of Man will go just as it is written about him. But woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It ...


1

Was Judas misinformed of the real purpose behind the planned arrest of Jesus? The Jewish Sanhedrin would probably prefer that their true intentions would not be known to Judas, who was one of the twelve. The day Judas Iscariot betrayed Our Lord will go down as being traditionally known as Spy Wednesday Nowhere in Scriptures, do we see Judas asking the ...


1

In addition to Nigel's answer. We are cautioned to be sober and vigilant, and to put on the whole armour of God as a guard against Satan. Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour (1 Peter 5:8) Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the ...


1

No. Despite the names "Judas" and "Judah" being derived from the same Hebrew word "Yehudah", the OT prophecy predicting Judas's betrayal with 30 pieces of silver came from Zech 11:12-13. Read the NLT translation of Zech 11:12-13: And I said to them, “If you like, give me my wages, whatever I am worth; but only if you want to.” So they counted out for my ...


1

This is my first attempt at an answer, so bear with me. They do seem potentially related. And by that I mean, the earlier betrayal of Judah (by worshipping Ba’al) can be seen as a type of what would end up happening to Jesus. But also, Judas himself can potentially be interpreted as a type for the Jews, as it is Judas (which is the same meaning as Judah, or ...


1

I have never heard anyone argue for the salvation of Judas before, but I believe that grace is free, and that justification is by grace alone, in Christ alone, by faith alone, according to the Scriptures alone... The Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been good for that man if he had not been born (Matthew 26:24) 'But there are some of you who do not ...


1

It appears that according to the gospels Judas was one of the eleven disciples that Jesus appeared to the day of his resurrection. Remember there was eleven because Thomas was not there the first time Jesus appeared unto them. Matthew 28:16: Then >>the eleven disciples<< went away into Galilee, into a mountain where Jesus had appointed them. Luke 24:...


1

While not a universalist, I can posit that a universalist inerrantist would principally invoke the classification of hyperbole, and say that for someone to abandon such apostolic potential to enter the messianic community was for the individual ever so tragic. Logically to never have been born, at least if it meant to never have been conceived, could never ...


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