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There are 3 distinct (fairly) well-known Josephs in the Bible, firstly in the Old Testament (mainly): Joseph the son of Jacob/Israel (aka The Patriarch Joseph). This Joseph is actually referred to in a few select places in the New Testament: John 4:5; Acts 7:9-18; Hebrews 11:21-22 & Revelation 7:8. However, it's more likely that a Joseph in the New ...


10

Biblical Commentary by Clarke gives us some reasons of why Joseph might have chosen only 5. Two of them are: Joseph took five of the meanest-looking of his brothers fearing that Pharaoh would detain them for his service, whereby their religion and morals might be corrupted. Joseph took five of the best made and finest-looking of his brethren and presented ...


9

Here is a fascinating article about the history of the idea that the pyramids were grain stores. There is no mention of pyramids in the Bible's version of the story but in the Middle Ages people started to write them into the story. "If you go to St Mark's cathedral in Venice, there's a medieval depiction showing people using the three great pyramids ...


8

There's no scripture where Jesus refers to Joseph as father--but that doesn't mean that he didn't, it just means it's not recorded. Other people certainly referred to Joseph as Jesus' father: John 6:42 ESV They said, “Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How does he now say, ‘I have come down from heaven’?” John 1:45 ESV ...


8

The Sun and the Moon do definitely represent his father and mother: Genesis 37:10 NKJV So he told it to his father and his brothers; and his father rebuked him and said to him, "What is this dream that you have dreamed? Shall your mother and I and your brothers indeed come to bow down to the earth before you?" The bowing down does not refer to the ...


7

Honestly, there are a lot of questions there and rather than skip around I'm going to give one really long background on the birthright and blessing. Just be glad I'm not also giving a treatment to the meaning of firstborn. There is a TL;DR Conclusion at the end, where I will revisit each specific question. But first there is a lot of groundwork to lay. ...


7

The Cherry Tree Carol is thought to date to the 16th or 17th century. The history of its development is murky, but it may be traced to a 15th century Coventry play1 and beyond that to the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, a 7th century apocryphal work describing the birth and childhood of Jesus. The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, which titles itself The Birth of the ...


7

This answer is complete speculation, as there is not much scriptural support. After reading through the gospel narratives of Jesus' childhood, I noticed a few points of interest: When instructing Joseph to flee Egypt and head to Israel, the angel does not refer to Joseph as the child's father: saying, “Rise, take the child and his mother and go to the ...


6

There is more than one person named Joseph in the Bible. The first Joseph that figures prominently in the biblical narrative appears in Genesis. Joseph is a son of Jacob, who is Israel. God spoke to Joseph in a dream, which showed that his brothers would one day bow down to him. Joseph is sold by his ten older brothers into slavery as a boy. Joseph is ...


6

There may be the occasional Christian who who speculates that there is a link between the pyramids and Joseph's grain storage, but it's not part of any mainstream theology. Consider three problems: The dates don't match. The great pyramid of Egypt was built around 2560-2570 BC, and most other pyramids were earlier still, whereas the Genesis famine managed ...


5

This appears to be essentially a bit of pragmatism. The foremost heir would inherit a double share of the father's inheritance, (this is what Elisha was referring to in 2 Kings 2:9,) and Joseph had been given this honor. Since the inheritance was to be passed down throughout generations, and Joseph had two sons, Jacob essentially said "we'll do it like ...


4

Joseph foreshadows the life of Jesus a few ways, and I'm sure that the list I'm about to give you isn't exhaustive by any stretch of the imagination, but I'll try to give a brief parallel summaries of both stories, which may help to highlight the similarities between both situations. Joseph Joseph says things that seem to claim he has a certain elevated ...


4

There are a couple of possible ways to reconcile this, both within the established Rules behind resolving alleged Biblical discrepancies used by Apologists. Copyist errors. The first comes by clarifying what "inerrancy" means, to debunk a straw-man argument that such a discrepancy in our current Bible is an issue in the first place. For an in-depth dive ...


4

From the Scripture, there is no direct information about the question. But after reading the answers and a little bit of dig into the Bible, I can say that it is probably "Father". And when they saw him, they were amazed: and his mother said unto him, Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? behold, thy father and I have sought thee sorrowing. And he ...


4

Yes, there are more than one Joseph in Scripture. There are at least three distinct men named Joseph in Scripture. In Genesis is Joseph the Patriarch, who was sold into slavery by his brothers, and who eventually rose to a position of great power in Egypt. In the new testament, we read of Joseph, who is Mary's husband (Mary being the mother of Jesus) as ...


4

According to ch. 1 of The Divine Favors Granted to St. Joseph (1973) by Père Binet, S.J., the general opinion among theologians is that St. Joseph was, when he married, "neither an old man nor a youth, but in the prime of life, between thirty and forty": A secret inspiration from heaven caused both Mary and Joseph to contract this alliance, while adoring ...


3

According to Catholicism, How would Jesus have addressed St. Joseph? Neither the Scriptures nor tradition provides any record of Jesus addressing Joseph in any way, and the only recorded uses of “Father” by Jesus are in reference to God the Father. Jesus spoke of God the Father as “My Father” and He spoke to others about God as “your Father” but nowhere in ...


2

Robert P. Carroll says in 'Prophecy and society', published in The World of Ancient Israel: Sociological, Anthropological and Political Perspectives page 209, the Bible presents so many different, ambiguous and ambivalent stories and treatments of prophets that the modern reader has to admit that the ancient Israelite writers had no clear image of what a ...


2

There is the line of the shifting of the birthright in Bible. In Genesis alone, there are at least four cases of the shifting of the birthright: from Esau to Jacob (25:22-26, 29-34); from Zarah to Pharez (38:27-30); from Reuben to Joseph (49:3-4; 1 Chron. 5:1); and from Manasseh to Ephraim (48:12-20). Furthermore, in the New Testament the birthright is ...


2

In patriarchal times, inheritance was [almost exclusively] passed-on to actual offspring of the family. Jacob in essence is adopting Joseph's two sons so that he can bless them and "legally" pass-on their inheritance.


2

In context, the list refers to the remnant that was protected from the '6th seal'. Here are two brief commentaries on it: Resources » The IVP New Testament Commentary Series » John's list does not match exactly any of the traditional lists of the tribes of Israel (for example, Gen 35:23-26; 49:1-28; Deut 33:6-25), either in the names or in the order of ...


2

There are actually 14 tribes if you consider Ephraim and Manasseh as additional tribes, but this is an abberation in my opinion since Ephraim inherited his father's portion so there were 13. Levi was not given land, his offspring being the priests. As you indicated Joseph received extra share of land which I suspect is what allowed Manasseh to separate ...


2

I'd say he chose them on the basis of affinity and his own personal relationship with them. We could then exclude the handmaiden's sons (Bilhah's and Zilpah's) Gad Asher Dan Naphtali And also Simeon and Levi, given they were violent and unreliable (re: Schechem, Rape of Dinah Story) and that (allegedly) Simeon incited his brothers to kill Joseph (Joseph ...


2

I am six months late answering this, but this same question, particularly, the "elaborate ruse", have been nagging me a long time; and this was the reason for me googling the topic, again, and this time stumbling to this site. For if I imagined myself in Joseph's shoes, it seems only natural and human to declare who you are to your brothers the moment you ...


2

There are a few, related reasons that the Blessed Mother, and not St. Joseph, is said to have "kept all these words, pondering them in her heart" (Lk. 2:19): On the nativity, Fr. Réginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P., writes (Mother of the Saviour and Our Interior Life ch. 3): Mary grew in humility, poverty and love of God by giving birth to her Son in ...


1

Jesus of Nazareth inherits the right to the throne through Joseph, the husband of his mother and his adoptive father. No-one else claimed the child. The genealogy stated in Matthew's gospel follows the royal line and the crown rights. No-one else could claim the crown rights by natural generation due to God's prohibition - the curse on Jeconiah (see Jeremiah ...


1

It seems that Luke gives Joseph's geneology (Luke 3:23-38): And Jesus himself was beginning about the age of thirty years; being (as it was supposed) the son of Joseph, who was of Heli, who was of Mathat, 24 Who was of Levi, who was of Melchi, who was of Janne, who was of Joseph, 25 Who was of Mathathias, who was of Amos, who was of Nahum, who was of ...


1

Paintings of the Holy Family with a young St. Joseph? There are numerous paintings depicting the foster father of Our Lord as a relatively young man. In fact, this seems to be one of those traditions within the Church that does not have a strong historical backing to it. It seems to be more of a popular tradition than actually related to Sacred Tradition. ...


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