Hot answers tagged

12

You might like to take a look at the related questions What does the Bible have to say about dinosaurs? and Are Dinosaurs mentioned in the Bible? for some dinosaur-specific ideas; and Do Catholics consider Job to be historical? for, well, exactly what the question title says. Job is a bit of a tricky book in many ways. It is certainly held up as a ...


6

Now the question of who is the target audience for Job is a tricky one, because there is the audience that Job intended, and the audience that God intended. Since the book is not addressed to a group as are Paul's letters, or to a son as is the Book of Proverbs, or to Theophilus as are Luke and Acts, the best clues come from understanding the purpose of the ...


4

I guess when you consider that Revelation clearly identifies the serpent in the garden as Satan, then this might appear to be a problem. However when you consider that Satan is a spiritual being that according to scripture can "enter" people, as well as Romans 16:20: The God of peace will soon crush Satan under your feet. Then it seems that there would ...


4

It would seem that is the earliest known Biblical reference to ashes being in Genesis, when Abraham accepts that he is nothing but dust and ashes before the LORD, so it is a symbol of humility before God. Then Abraham answered and said, “Indeed now, I who am but dust and ashes have taken it upon myself to speak to the Lord..." Genesis 18:27 ...


4

As to your question regarding origins, we do not know the author or the means of revelation of the book of Job. What we do know is that there is an ancient tradition including the book in Hebrew scripture. The book makes no reference to the patriarchs or the law or the prophets but it is consistent with teachings therein and is commonly considered to ...


4

Yes, there has been an evolution in thinking about the nature of the devil. Jeffrey B. Russell says, in The Prince of Darkness, page 37, that in Job, Satan is already a personality with the function of accusing, opposing, and harming human beings. He is not yet the principle of evil, for he is still one of the heavenly court and does nothing without God's ...


4

I've been taught (Reformed Presbyterian) that Job's first three friends did some things right (e.g., wait until Job spoke first), but mostly they did things wrong (applied generally good theology incorrectly to the situation at hand). Elihu was not commenting on the previous history and whether Job had sinned before all the catastrophe; Elihu was commenting ...


4

The Catechism of the Catholic Church does not specifically prohibit employment of, say, working for a defense contractor, but it does set some parameters. First, employment is the primary path to functioning within the social order. CCC 2428 says: In work, the person exercises and fulfills in part the potential inscribed in his nature. The primordial value ...


4

Great Question, I was actually wondering the same thing for a while until I did some reading. The entire bible was written with the Inspiration of God, as found in 2 Timothy 3:16 NKJV 16 All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, So basically God told ...


3

Job lived during a time when a father was the priest for his family. Job 1:5 says, When a period of feasting had run its course, Job would make arrangements for them to be purified. Early in the morning he would sacrifice a burnt offering for each of them, thinking, “Perhaps my children have sinned and cursed God in their hearts.” This was Job’s ...


3

Job was a man who loved God. Satan told God that he only reason Job loved Him was because He allowed him to be wealthy. So to prove him wrong, God allowed Satan to take all of Job's possessions. Job's oldest son's home was destroyed by a violent wind. All of Job's children were partying there and were killed. In his sadness, Job tore his robe. Despite all ...


3

The Bible says the devil = Satan in Revelation 12:9 So the great dragon was cast out, that serpent of old, called the Devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was cast to the earth, and his angels were cast out with him. Regarding Lucifer the Bible says in Isaiah 14:12... How you are fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! How ...


3

In ancient Near Eastern religions, Leviathan was a multi-headed chaos monster whom the gods had to defeat at the time of creation. Mark S. Smith says, in The Early History of God, page 86, a seal from Tel Asmar (c.2200 BCE) depicts a god battling a seven-headed dragon, identified as Baal's enemy, Leviathan, and God's adversary in the Bible. The leviathan ...


3

The problem with the answers previously given here, and what the majority of English-speaking Christians believe, is that it comes from a perspective of the English translation of the Bible. The Bible isn't of English origin. The Old Testament was written in Hebrew (and called Tanach in that language), and the New Testament was written in Greek. Lucifer isn'...


3

There are suggestions that Uz is in central Syria, north of Israel, because of a genealogy in Genesis 10:23, but hard evidence for its location is not so readily available. Reference to attacks by Chaldeans (Job 1:17) would normally place the location of Uz to the east of Palestine, but reference to the Sabaeans would probably place its location in southern ...


3

At the moment of Creation, evil was separated from Righteousness. In Ephesians chapter 3, Paul writes about the eternal plan of God: "v10 (God's) intent was that now, through the church, the manifold wisdom of God should be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms (Satan and other angels in Job ch 1&2 etc.), v11 according to his ...


3

The practice of throwing dust upon the head symbolizes humility and repentance. By casting the dust over one's head, they are equating themselves to the same level as the dust of the earth and are seeking God's pity and forgiveness. The Hebrew word translated as 'dust' and 'ashes' is עָפָר "a'phar". In Esther, it uses the word אֵפֶר "e'pher&...


2

The practice of throwing dust upon one's head actually predates the writing of the Bible by several centuries, appearing in the pyramid texts of Egypt from the Pyramid of Pepi II. These writings date to around 2278 B.C. - some of the oldest know writings by humanity. For comparison, Abraham is usually dated to 1800 BC, so these mourning rituals were not ...


2

Before you ask what Calvin thought, it might be a good idea to ask, "What did Job think?" Job 9:2 Yes, I know what you’ve said is true, but how can a person be justified before God? Job had no illusion that his life, his righteous words and deeds, were capable of rendering him justified before God. If he had confidence that his actions could effect ...


2

John Calvin makes it clear in his commentary on the book of Job : For after that Job hath been reported to have been sound, it is also said of him, that he was upright. This uprightness is meant of the life he led, which is as it were the fruit of the said root, which the Holy Ghost had planted afore. Job then had an upright and sound heart. For his life ...


2

First of all, there's no question that Calvinists believe that the fornication of Job 31 and Ephesians 5 is a damning sin (like all sins). At the same time, they would oppose the idea that even a serious failure by a truly converted person automatically consigns such a person to hell (cf. David). But your question is focused on this particular passage in ...


2

You are quite correct, that very few writers try to explain Behemoth, dealing instead with Leviathan. I also note a heavy tendency to try to say what animals they might have been, whereas the book of Job is dealing with massive, eternal issues of suffering, pain, and God’s justice. Surely we should see God’s comments about Behemoth and Leviathan as His ...


2

As Nigel J suggested in his comment, the book of Job is addressed to every single person on earth. Its “target audience” is every human who has ever lifted his eyes to heaven and cried out, “Why me, God?” It’s God’s message to all of humanity to remind them that He is sovereign, that His judgments are righteous and it isn’t the place of mere mortals to ...


2

What is the definition of son of God in Job 2:1? For the Chosen People, it usually refers to the Hebrew nation or people in general. Although references to "sons of God", "son of God" and "son of the LORD" are occasionally found in Jewish literature, they never refer to physical descent from God. There are two instances where Jewish kings are ...


2

Is there anywhere in the bible that says Job and Jobab is the same person? Yes and no. Roman Catholic and Protestant Bibles finish the Book of Job with the death of Job at a great age in chapter 42 verse 17. However the Septuagint, a Greek translation of the Jewish scriptures, has an additional passage known as the Postscript. This additional passage is ...


2

The evidence points to: yes @davidlol's answer presents more direct evidence. There is other, less direct evidence. I read one archaeological article that says that the trade routes described in Job put Job in the area of Edom. The rest of this answer is an excerpt from chapter 15 of my book, Job Rises: Thirteen Keys to a Resilient Life. This draws on ...


2

The mainstream Jewish view of Satan emanates from the Book of Job. Satan is seen as the Adversary or Prosecutor, an agent of Jehovah, very much part of the divine council, that searches out the individual's wrongdoings and appears as their accuser. This notion differs from mainstream Christian notions of Satan as some demonic fallen angel who opposes God or ...


1

Regarding your main question, the meaning of "jealous" in Exodus 34:14 pertains to worshipping God to the exclusion of all others. God will not put up with rivalry or unfaithfulness. Usually his "jealousy" conerns Israel and assumes the covenant relationship [analogous to marriage' and the Lord's exclusive right to possess Israel and to claim her love ...


1

The short answer is that we are not told why. Within the context of the book of Job, God uses Satan's evil for the ultimate good of vindicating Job's faith, multiplying his blessings, and glorifying God's name. God demonstrates intentionality with Satan's presence. Just as Job never is told about the spiritual backstory to his suffering, we are not told ...


1

Most believe Moses authored Job. This would make sense since the Bible says Moses spoke with God "face to face". If so then this direct conversation with God could lead to learning about the inner workings of the Job story. Remember that the book of Job quotes Job's friends who bear a false testimony, so in those sections what they say is not ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible