10

The tradition of palm branches on Palm Sunday actually originates with the Jewish festival of Sukkoth, also called the Festival of the Tabernacles or Booths, which was probably the most popular holiday among the Jews in the first century. In the observance of Sukkoth, worshippers processed through Jerusalem and in the Temple, waving in their right hands ...


9

As I understand it all Jewish brides are stolen, they are snatched away. All Jewish brides were said to be “stolen, caught up, or snatched up by surprise.” The bride was then led to the groom’s house by a wedding procession of women carrying lighted lamps, similar to the Parable of the Ten Virgins that we will explore in next month’s Personal ...


6

John's Baptism for the remission of sins is particularly interesting, because he seems to have performed it in place of the temple rites of purification via sin offerings. IE, he was competing with the priests in the temple (he was a priest himself, as was his father Zechariah, who came from an Aaronic family and was high enough to be able to offer incense ...


6

Christianity isn't fixated on ancient Israelite culture, Christianity is fixated on the history of God's dealings with his people. You won't find in the Bible: Ancient Israelite sports Ancient Israelite childrens' games Ancient Israelite recipes Ancient Israelite fashion Ancient Israelite hair and makeup styling Ancient Israelite marriage rituals or ...


4

Jews did not necessarily think it was immoral to have leprosy, but most scholars and Biblical commentaries agree that it was a common belief among the Jewish people of Jesus' day that leprosy, as well as disease and disability in general, was caused by sin. Old Testament evidence In the Old Testament, there are a number of passage that say doctors are of ...


4

The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church maintains a practice that resembles Kosher food laws. (There are similarities and differences: the members of this church avoid pork, but they do commonly mix meat and dairy products in their cuisine.)


4

This is just to supplement Ken Graham's excellent answer which covers both the Jewish and Christian views of the lampstand in question. The Jewish nation was given specific instructions for the design of the lampstand that was to grace the Tabernacle in the wilderness, as written down in the ancient Hebrew scriptures, specifically in the book of Exodus ...


4

Wikipedia put it this way: The menorah (Hebrew: מְנוֹרָה‬) is described in the Bible as the seven-lamp (six branches) ancient Hebrew lampstand made of pure gold and used in the portable sanctuary set up by Moses in the wilderness and later in the Temple in Jerusalem. Fresh olive oil of the purest quality was burned daily to light its lamps. The menorah ...


3

Many of the homes of the time had a courtyard around which were situated various rooms. The courtyard was used for cooking and eating. In John McCray's book Archaeology and the New Testament, he has some diagrams of typical houses of the period. The point being that to "enter" someone's house was not like it is today. The courtyard was open and people ...


3

Scripture alone simply means that scripture is the sole rule of all things salvific. It is not about defining the 66 books or more. Nor is it about defining doctrines therefrom. It is only about believing that scripture tells us all we need to know about faith and practice. In determining doctrine (faith and practice), one looks to scripture alone. We ...


3

The "festival of dedication" (or "feast") in this verse was indeed the forerunner of what is today Hanukkah. It was established by Judas Maccabeus in the intertestamental period, as Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown write: [This festival of the Dedication] was instituted by Jude Maccabeus, to commemorate the purification of the temple from the profanations to ...


3

There is much disagreement as to whether the word translated 'carpenter' in: Matthew 13:55 Is not this the carpenter's son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? and, Mark 6:3 Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his ...


2

According to the Babylon Talmud the walls of the second temple were carved throughout with cherubim, palms, and open-faced flowers (inspired by Ezekiel's vision), and overlaid with gold. To the Jews the palms are a celebratory symbol that God, the victorious one, tabernacles with humanity. It wasn't the season for Sukkot, but those recognizing Jesus as ...


2

To answer the question, No, during the Old Testament period the Mosaic Law didn't require immersion rituals, but sprinkling (of blood) & washing (bronze laver) are covered. Elisha/Naaman account records 'dipping in Jordan (2kings5:14)'; however it was not a practiced ritual but could have evolved from the rituals presented then. But the mission of John ...


2

Yes. The feast of the dedication was a festival celebrating the re-dedication if the sacrificial altar. It was instituted by by Judas Maccabaees. This was later referred to as the festival of lights. It was/is Hanukkah. On the lunar-solar calendar this celebration falls in December and sometimes in November. While this is somewhat opinion, there is no ...


2

Did Jesus have His Last Supper standing? The Short answer is no Scripture seems to indicate that Jesus and his disciples were reclined while eatig at the Last Supper. Institution of the Lord's Supper (Matthew 26:26–29) 26 Now as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and after blessing it broke it and gave it to the disciples, and said, “Take, eat; this is my ...


2

Given that Judaism does not believe Jesus was the Messiah or that there is going to be a rapture of the Christian Church, then I think it is safe to say that any comparison between what happens at a Jewish wedding and the Christian view of the rapture has been made by Christians. However, from the information you provided at section (2) in this link http://...


2

Jewish traditions regarding the Sabbath at the time of Jesus? Then returned they unto Jerusalem from the mount called Olivet, which is from Jerusalem a sabbath day's journey. - Acts 1:12 KJV Josephus makes the Mount of Olives to be about six stadia from Jerusalem and it is thus the acceptable distance between these two places which in Acts 1:12 is given ...


1

The following article may be useful to you. This extract is about the Jewish Shabbat: Jewish law (halakha) prohibits doing any form of melakhah (מְלָאכָה, plural melakhoth) on Shabbat, unless an urgent human or medical need is life-threatening. Though melakhah is commonly translated as "work" in English, a better definition is "deliberate activity" or "...


1

Giving a name while doing circumcision? Catholics celebrated the Feast of the Circumcision on January 1st up until Vatican II. The Feast of the Circumcision of Christ is a Christian celebration of the circumcision of Jesus in accordance with Jewish tradition, eight days (according to the Semitic and southern European calculation of intervals of days) ...


1

They ate the Last Supper reclining. The reason Alfred Edersheim gives to this is more than a little interesting, which can be summarised thus: The reason they ate the Last Supper, and the Passover meals in general, in a reclining position is because it was a graphic declaration and reminder to the Jewish people that they were no longer slaves. "... it ...


1

Maybe I cannot address exactly your questions, but some point to consider: The woman was not a strange in that house Simon, the pharisee known her; Wasn't obvious that she was a sinner This because Simon questioned if Jesus was really a prophet to "guess" who is the woman; Jesus was well-know for being in company with sinners


1

Some Jews seemed to think that lepersy was a punishment for sin, rather than a sin itself. However, not all Jews did, as the Book of Job straight out denies that all suffering is due to past sin. Remember how Job's friends kept telling Job to repent for a past sin, but Job keeps telling them that there is no such sin? Well, when God comes into the ...


1

When God instituted the Levitical priesthood, Moses washed (baptized fully) Aaron and his sons into said priesthood (Ex. 29:4, 40:12). So yes, baptism was God commanded, as a one-time event upon the start of a priesthood and subsequently by Levitical descendants into that priesthood. John the Baptist's job, as the forerunner of Messiah, was to turn the ...


1

'Rules' regarding hygiene are literally a matter of life and death. The Pharisees enforced their 'rules' strictly to ensure the health of the Jewish community. The rules became laws that separated, when less hygienic gentiles started mixing with the Jews. The Galileans followed the custom of the Greeks who did not wash their hands before eating. According ...


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