15

You are starting from three incorrect postulates: Scribes are just copyists, not interpreters of the law. The doctrine of preservation of scripture is the same as inerrancy. Variants have semantic importance All three of those need to be true for your statement to make sense. Unfortunately, none of them are. 1. Scribes aren't just secretaries. They are ...


10

The extent to which Jeremiah is known as the 'weeping prophet' is so entrenched that there is even an Englsh word - jeremiad ("a sad lamentation") - that enshrines the concept. Jeremiah's weeping traditionally comes from his authorship of the book of Lamentations (his other book!), which is a jeremiad (if you'll pardon the pun), mourning the capture and ...


8

I generally agree with another answer and comments that “modern translations are better”, but I will elaborate a bit on how the variant translations came about. The Hebrew of interest: כְּתֹ֨מֶר מִקְשָׁ֥ה הֵ֙מָּה֙ kətōmer miqšâ hēmmâ They [the idols] are like a tōmer of a miqšâ Both tōmer and miqšâ are somewhat obscure. Tōmer appears only here in the ...


8

John Calvin does indeed treat this verse. He says:1 By saying אולי, auli, “if peradventure,” he made use of a common mode of speaking. God indeed has perfect knowledge of all events, nor had he any doubt respecting what would take place, when the prophets had discharged their duties; but what is pointed out here, and also condemned, is the obstinacy of ...


6

If you read the whole chapter you'll see that this verse talks about teachers of the law spreading false interpretations of it. It is not about alterations of the OT scriptures themselves.


6

Yes, it appears from the description that Jeremiah was not completely honest with the officials. They probably were asking about Jeremiah's prophecies, and he did not tell them what they wanted to know. Whether this is technically lying depends on exactly what questions were asked and exactly what answers Jeremiah gave, but it's pretty clear that Jeremiah ...


5

Several answers have pointed out that the KJV's word choice may be due to usage of archaic English. What has not been adequately explained, as far as I see, is why the KJV and, e.g., the ESV (cf. NASB) differ in the use of one vs. two noun here — "a future and a hope" (ESV) vs. "an expected end" (KJV). This variation is somewhat surprising given that ...


5

Jeremiah is commonly known as the "weeping prophet," based on his wish to have a "fountain of tears" with which he might weep for the slain of his own people (9:1). It is this trait of deep empathy for those he continually chastises that differentiates him from others When God called him, he received a six-fold task, to "pluck up and pull down," to "destroy ...


4

I would suggest Jeremiah 1:7-8 and 1:18-19 as an answer. There we find that it is God who protects him wherever he goes. It wasn't the Babylonians' pity that stayed their hands; God Himself protected Jeremiah from them and the Israelites. Jer 1:7 But the LORD said unto me, Say not, I am a child: for thou shalt go to all that I shall send thee, and ...


4

It is ironic that your question would make a statement concerning the legitimacy of the Word of God when Jeremiah asked the same question to God’s people. In context, this verse is revealing how they would take God’s word and change it “falsely.” This was spoken by Jeremiah in the context of God’s people leaving God, and living their own lives as if they ...


4

Jehovah's Witnesses have not published an article specifically explaining this verse within the context of the Trinity, but the fundamental argument being presented is a common one: God's actions and Jesus' actions are the same, so they must be the same. The Bible describes the relationship between God and His Son in great detail, and from this Jehovah's ...


4

No, Jeremiah (and you and me) didn't have a soul until it was "formed in the womb" The Church teaches that every spiritual soul is created immediately by God CCC 366 It's pretty clear and unambiguous, even Jesus' human soul was created at the Incarnation. (please correct me if the tense or the verbs "was created" are wrong). The function of the ...


3

Yes, Jehovah’s Witnesses believe that the New Covenant is open to Gentiles. However, they believe that only 144,000 persons since the time of Jesus can be sealed and anointed by Jehovah’s spirit, enter into the New Covenant and have Christ Jesus as their mediator. They believe that since 1919, when they were chosen as Jehovah’s earthly representatives, the ...


3

God makes a distinction between your (the people to whom the prophecy is directed) prophets (e.g. 1 Ki 22:23, Jer 27:9, Jer 27:9, Ezek 13:1-7) and my (God's) prophets (e.g. 1 Chr 16:21-23).1 God's prophets are the only true prophets. The others are false prophets (e.g. De 13:1-5, 2 Ki 18:19, 1 Ki 22:1-28, Jer 2:8, Jer 5:31). Regarding Ezekiel 12:27 ...


3

Contra your assertion that "This Scripture portion is one of Jeremiah's confessions to the Lord", most conservative commentators interpret a switch in voice starting from verse 5 (The NIV even inserts a section heading to that effect) - the prophet is recording the words of the Lord: Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers - ...The speaker is clearly ...


3

I disagree that there is a contradiction here. It is more of a subtle difference in the meaning of the two words being compared, “expected” and “hope”. I do see how “expected end” can be a greater indicator of an actual end that the word hope indicates. But, it appears that you are assigning the secular meaning to the word “hope” which is really wishful ...


2

The Hebrew calendar is actually a luni-solar one (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_calendar). It is based not only on the moon, but also by the sun. The reason is the moon revolves slower around the earth (about 29-30 days) than the earth around the sun (about 365.25 days). This means that roughly every three years, the Hebrew calendar "added" a month ...


2

Paul writes of the potter making a vessel to dishonor and another to honor. This is more akin to making an ashtray (dishonor), and a wine flask (honor), than to "ugly" and "not ugly". It is true that, according to Paul (and, therefore, Calvinism), some are made to be children of wrath, and others children of mercy. In fact according to Romans 5, alll are ...


2

TL;DR -- Context lets them coexist without contradiction. The longer version: God's word to Jeremiah in the first passage represented specific instructions for a specific mission. At the base level of common sense, it would be a mistake to interpret those instructions as any kind of a generalized principle -- any more than God's word to Noah means that we'...


2

1. The Covenants of Men When an agreement was reached about wages of a penny a day, Matthew 20:13, the word used is συμθονεο, sumphoneo (sun, together, and phoneo to speak strongly). The same word is used when two agree together on earth about any matter, Matthew 18:19. Another, stronger word is used when the Jews agreed together, in council, to cast ...


2

Is there a biblical basis for believing that the Prophet Jeremiah and St. John the Baptist were born without original sin? Some Catholics do believe that the Prophet Jeremiah and St. John the Baptist were born without original sin. This pious belief, however has of yet not been raised to the level of a dogma. First of let us consider St. John the Baptist. ...


1

Jeremiah was about 17 years of age when the Lord commissioned him to be a prophet: “I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (Jeremiah 1:5). This commission was to last for 40 years. The purpose was for God to demonstrate his patience with a nation that had rejected him and turned to idolatry. God knew his warnings would be rejected, but nonetheless, ...


1

I knew a Messianic Rabbi years ago, he and his congregation definitely accepted the New Covenant and the same goes for others I have since met online. (Meaning they accepted Christ as Savior, accepted the Council of the Book of Acts that gentiles are not bound by the Mosaic law etc.). Anyway, that rabbi tended to relate Messianic Judaism along the lines of ...


1

Rom 16:27... to God, who alone is wise, be the glory through Jesus. (Does that mean anyone who is wise is GOD?) No. Ps 19:7 The reminder of Jehovah is trustworthy, making the inexperienced one wise. 1 Tim 6:16... He is the King of those who rule as kings and Lord of those who rule as lords, the one alone having immortality. (Does that mean anyone ...


1

No, not really. The closest we get is the Marcionites, a Gnostic sect who rejected the Old Testament and believed the God of the Israelites was a different and inferior god to the god of the New Testament. Nevertheless, this question would never rise or fall on the translation of Jeremiah 7:22 since there are tons of extended passages in the Old Testament ...


1

The prophecy of Jeremiah’s 70 years has two aspects, but unfortunately, commentators conflate them with each other. A few years after the Assyrian Empire collapsed, he made his extraordinary prediction that the incoming empire of Babylon would last seventy years then it too would end. His word came true to the very year! Babylon fell to the Medes and ...


1

Here's what the Catholic Haydock Commentary says about those verses: Ver. 31. Covenant. That made with the captives was not such. Their covenant is grown old, and at an end, as St. Paul shews, Hebrews viii. 8. They were not indeed divided, as they had been, Ezechiel xxxvii. 16. Ver. 32. Dominion. As a husband, (Hebrew; Calmet) or "Lord." (Haydock) ---...


1

The text has not been changed. The more modern versions are better translations. The King James version was translated by clever people according to the best knowledge they had at the time. However in the 350 years since then we have learned a lot about the original Hebrew languages and are able to make better translations of the original. The translators ...


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