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20

"Why did God choose Israel?" appears as a common question among some Christians. For example, we had entire sermons for weeks based on this one question. Enough of that now; to the answer! God chose Israel because of His promise to Abraham. As a reward for Abraham's faith in the Lord, God said to him in Genesis 12:2-3: I will make you a great nation; I ...


15

Jacob had twelve sons by four women. They are: From Leah: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, and Zebulun From Rachel: Joseph and Benjamin From Bilhah (Rachel's maid): Dan and Naphtali From Zilpah (Leah's maid): Gad and Asher Joseph, of course, had two sons - Manasseh and Ephraim. The tribe of Levi was not given an inheritance, as we see in Joshua 13:...


15

There are several issues you bring up that need to be addressed in this question, and it is going to take a little space. Only Israel? You are correct in your assumption that God loves the whole world and not just Israel. However, Israel was, indeed, specifically chosen as part of God's plan to proclaim His name throughout the world. Here is a general ...


15

God did promise the land of Canaan to Abraham. For example God says to Abram (Abraham) in Genesis 17:8: The whole land of Canaan, where you now reside as a foreigner, I will give as an everlasting possession to you and your descendants after you; and I will be their God. However, a few verses earlier, God said that Abraham would be "the father of ...


13

The term Gentile in the Bible simply means non-Jew or non-Hebrew. In Old Testament times, the Hebrews called the other non-Hebrews as Gentiles and in the New Testament, non-Jews are Gentiles. In the New Testament, Paul was famous for preaching to the Gentiles. Because Paul was a Jew, he was zealous for his own people and preached the gospel mostly to the ...


12

Was Jesus a Jew? Yes. He was born and raised up in a Jewish family and that was also from the descendant of King David. Did Jesus follow Judaism? Yes. He was circumcised. He followed the Torah perfectly. In fact, He knew the Torah better than anyone else. He was called Rabbi, a title given to those who teach from the Torah. John 3:1-2 (NIV) Now there ...


11

Yes, Jesus was a Jew who practiced Judaism, the religion of the Bible in the 1st century. The gospels record Jesus teaching the Torah (Law) and prophets at synagogues on shabbat (e.g. Luke 4:16) and at the Temple complex in Jerusalem. He was called 'rabbi', kept disciples (common in 1st-century Judaism), discussed matters of the Torah and made halachic ...


11

Manasseh was a full tribe. However, half of the tribe of Manasseh settled in the Holy Land proper, and half of the tribe of Manasseh, along with the full tribes of Reuben and Gad, settled on the other (east) side of the Jordan. The story is told in Numbers 32, which starts: Now the Reubenites and the Gadites owned a very great number of cattle. When they ...


8

You kind of tipped your hand by using the word ideology in your question! An unscriptural ideology is at the heart of a deficient theology regarding Israel and the Christian Church. (By Church, with a capital C, I'm referring to the universal or "holy catholic" church, which is composed of all true believers in Jesus Christ.) There Is No Legitimate ...


8

Yes, that's right. The origin of "Jew" actually comes from Judah, one of the sons and tribes of Jacob/Israel. When the Kingdom of Israel splits after Solomon, the dominant tribe of the southern kingdom was Judah, and so it came to be called the Kingdom of Judah. Though there have always been descendents of all the sons and tribes of Israel, the prominence ...


7

Fundamentally, Christians and Jews worship God the Father in similar fashion, but Christians (meaning Mainstream or Nicene aka Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity) believe God to be larger than just that. Nicene Christianity confesses that God the Father is "just" one person amongst three within the Godhead. Muslims and Jews reject this. ...


7

Most branches of Christianity see Jesus, the Son of God, as the Jewish Messiah in fulfillment of Jewish prophecies and foreshadowing in the Jewish Scriptures. God foretold, though, that the Seed of Abraham would be a blessing to all people--every tribe, tongue and nation. The apostle Paul specifies that the gospel is to the Jew first and also to the ...


7

Throughout the narrative parts of the Old Testament, there is very little mention of any afterlife. That idea arises mostly later on, in the books of the Prophets. During the bulk of Old Testament times, salvation had little or nothing to do with: Heaven or the afterlife, since there was little or no belief in such a thing. Being freed from the curse of ...


7

There are three principal interpretations of this passage among Protestants and Catholics. "All Israel" might refer to: A future large-scale conversion of Jewish people to Christianity All the Jewish people elected by God All the people of God, both Gentiles and Jews The first of these views is easily the most popular, and is widely held by ...


6

There are two seemingly conflicting descriptions of the end times for Israel, that many resolve by figuring there will be a peace treaty. Since the tribulation is 7 years, they assume that to be the duration. To wit, the references in question are: Per Matthew 24:6, it will be a time of war You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that ...


6

The promises made to Israel were conditional promises. He had plans for them if they obeyed and kept His Holy Commandments. The rest of the nations were supposed to see Israel and come to God through their example. 'Now then, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be My own possession among all the peoples, for all the ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


6

Herod Antipas was the son of Herod the Great and younger brother of Archelaus (both by Malthrace). Jesus was born during the reign of Herod the Great. Herod the Great's initial political career was as the the governor of Galilee, and later he was appointed as king over Judea by Caesar Octavius (Augustus). After he died, there was some conflict as to which of ...


6

If you search for "Jew" in an English Bible (example, NIV), you find very few hits, in contrast to "Israelites". In fact, the first appearances of the word Jew is in the book of Ezra, which is the 15th book of the Bible! And actually, in that book, the sense of the term Jew refers, to my understanding, to the Israelites of the Kingdom of Judah. The next book,...


5

Let me append to what Mawia said. Jesus clearly identified with the Jews of His day, although correcting its errors in the process. God purposely sent Him to Judah: John 1:11-12 He came to what was his own, but his own people did not receive him. But to all who have received him – those who believe in his name – he has given the right to become God’...


5

Jacob (Israel) had twelve sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin (Genesis 29:32 - 30:24 and Genesis 35:18). However the twelves tribes turned into thirteen when Jacob gave Joseph a 'double portion'. This meant that each of his two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, became a tribe, rather than just the ...


5

Dan fell into idolatry in Judges 17 and 18, and was thus removed: Judges 18:30-31: And the people of Dan set up the carved image for themselves, and Jonathan the son of Gershom, son of Moses, and his sons were priests to the tribe of the Danites until the day of the captivity of the land. So they set up Micah's carved image that he made, as long as ...


5

The answer to the first part of your question, appears to lie in the fact that only the Levites responded to Moses call for all who were on the Lord's side to come to him. It is also good to understand that not all who rebelled against God on that day were killed, which may answer your, second question about the added punishment which was meted out to all ...


5

Introduction The Bible's history of the Israelite people is put in the context of a branching family tree of humanity going all the way back to the first humans on earth. At each point where the tree branches, the lineage is traced through a particular son in preference to the other possible lineages. Though the reason for picking one lineage over another is ...


5

Why do Christians consider Jesus to be the king of the Jews? Jesus is the heir of David: And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. And the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob ...


5

The short answer is: We don't know for sure because there are very few dates or ages given in the stories of Saul and David in the Bible. We cannot even be certain of the length of Saul's reign, or of how old he was when he began to reign—information that is commonly provided for kings of Judah and Israel in the narratives of the Hebrew Bible. That ...


5

I went to this official, accredited SDA web-site for this information, where SDA officials respond to more difficult questions about their founder, Mrs. Ellen G. White, that are not generally tackled in other official web-sites. https://whiteestate.org/legacy/issues-faq-unus-html/#unusual-section-d2 There was a question, “Jerusalem Never to be Rebuilt?” that ...


4

That a period of peace with the Nation of Israel will take place during the first three and one half years of the Great Tribulation, comes from Chapter 9 of the book of Daniel, and was verified by Jesus in chapter 24 of the book of Matthew. Daniel 9:24 through 27 KJV 24 Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the ...


4

No. In Christianity, there are two sets of people, but one group is not excluded or held to different standards than the other. There are: God's chosen covenant people. Everybody else. God's people are identified solely by their faith in Jesus Christ as savior/redeemer. By faith we become part of the same family. With those who have faith in His Son, God ...


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