Hot answers tagged

18

The existing answer provides a learned and fascinating discussion for tracing the interpretative history of Isaiah 52:13-53:12 (often conveniently abbreviated to "Isaiah 53", the so-called "Fourth Servant Song") from roughly the 1st C. CE. Thus, the conclusion... We can ... be confident that first century converts to Christianity did not invent the idea ...


16

You are confusing titles with proper names. Yesh'ua (Heb.) is rendered "Jesus" or "Joshua" today. It is his given name. It means "Jehovah Saves." Christos (Greek) is a title translating the Hebrew "Messiah" or "Annointed One." It highlights his annointed and special status. Immanuel (Heb.) is a simple Hebrew construction that says "God is with us." It is ...


16

First, it should be noted that even if Jews did not view the passage as Messianic before Jesus, that does not prove that it is a invalid interpretation. In Old Testament times, Biblical prophecies were often not recognized until they were fulfilled. That said, let's look at the evidence. Targum Jonathan ben Uziel The Targums are interpretative ...


9

The question is not whether or not to trust people, but whether or not to put your trust in people. Obviously, people are quite capable of telling the truth. However, trusting in people to meet your needs is where the problem comes in. People are mortal and finite with limited power. Indeed, they have "only a breath in their nostrils". This may be ...


9

First, it's important to take that scripture in context so going through verse 12 reads: Ye are my witnesses, saith the LORD, and my servant whom I have chosen: that ye may know and believe me, and understand that I am he: before me there was no God formed, neither shall there be after me. I, even I, am the Lord; and beside me there is no saviour. ...


7

The Catholic Church does stand behind the verse, but insists that it be read in context, and in the context of the literary genre of the passage. As such it applies only to the children of the King of Babylon at the time the passage was written, and was long ago made moot, no longer applying to living persons. Further it does not command anyone to commit ...


7

And why is he called Counselor? These are adjectives used to describe/praise him. These are metaphorical descriptions. He is also a brother and a son - Mat 12:48 He replied to him, “Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?” 49 Pointing to his disciples, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers. 50 For whoever does the will of my Father in ...


7

This is easily reconciled because here is nothing to reconcile! Christ has never faltered, been disheartened, or crushed. He fulfilled His mission while here on earth, continues to do so as our advocate, and will continue to do so. His death and resurrection demonstrated this, rather than negating it! A look at Christian commentaries shows that this is the ...


7

St. Matthew 12:20 = Isaias 42:3. The Catholic Haydock Commentary quotes St. John Chrysostom (hom. xli) on this verse: The bruised reed. The prophet here shews the mildness of our Saviour, who, though he could have broken them like a reed, and as a bruised reed, yet would not do it; and though he could have easily extinguished their rage and anger, yet he ...


7

Well I am an opponent of penal substitution and can give an answer that I believe is within the bounds of Eastern Orthodox tradition. Note the part where the verse says: "yet we considered him punished by God". This phrase implies that it is wrong to consider him punished by God, which is explicitly what penal substitution teaches in the reformed tradition. ...


6

In the passage you mention it never says Jesus sinned or did evil. We can find the answer to that question in Hebrews 4:14-15 Seeing then that we have a great High Priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in ...


6

Jesus can be referred to as “a god” even though he is not God Almighty for the following reasons: http://m.wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200001729?q=ps+82%3A6&p=par#h=10... The judges of Israel were called “gods”. At Psalm 82:1, 6, ʼelo·himʹ is used of men, human judges in Israel. Jesus quoted from this Psalm at John 10:34, 35. They were “gods” in their ...


6

Probably. It's kind of complicated. First to re-iterate the intro to the JST The Lord inspired the Prophet Joseph Smith to restore truths to the King James Bible text that had become lost or changed since the original words were written While many Latter Day Saints believe the corrections the JST make are from the period when the KJV was originally ...


5

His whole title in Aramaic is actually " ישוע משחא בר אלהא אחדאיא ", or "Jesus the Messiah, the only Begotten Son of God", according to the Nicene creed written in Aramaic. It shows how God is with us in that respect. Not only that, but the prophecies in Isaiah can be taken to mean qualities of the Messiah, literally being called (qarat shemo וְקָרָ֥את ...


5

This is the NIV translation: He will be eating curds and honey when he knows enough to reject the wrong and choose the right Children are not aware of good or evil until they reach a certain age, "age of accountability", and understanding. One cannot choose to do good or evil until one is aware of what good and evil are and the differences between them, ...


5

From a Baptist perspective We studied this in our Sunday School. In our studies we also assume it is a literal highway, that will exist but it is *also a figurative "picture" for walking with Christ in salvation. Scripture contains many passages that are both literal and metaphorical. I'll stop at one example, though there are many: The priests in the Old ...


5

From Isaiah 7 ESV (emphasis mine): 1-4 In the days of Ahaz the son of Jotham, son of Uzziah, king of Judah, Rezin the king of Syria and Pekah the son of Remaliah the king of Israel came up to Jerusalem to wage war against it, but could not yet mount an attack against it. When the house of David was told, "Syria is in league with Ephraim," the heart of ...


5

The simplest explanation is that God did not literally rest, but simply that he "rested from creating." From a Christian perspective, God did not rest, in the sense that he stopped doing anything, on the seventh day. In fact, he was then very active in his relationship with Adam and Eve, and all the rest of humanity.


5

TL;DR: Milk before meat. Deep doctrine is dangerous to an unprepared soul. "I have fed you with milk, and not with meat: for hitherto ye were not able to bear it, neither yet now are ye able." (see 1 Corinthians 3:1-3) Christ taught in parables [as did Isaiah] so that the spiritually immature and spiritually mature could both benefit from the message....


5

Isaiah chapter 11 is about the heir to David’s throne. It is a Messianic prophecy. Psalm 72 reflects on the prospects of David’s royal line and on Zion. The surpassing righteousness and domination sought in this prayer foreshadow the coming of Jesus, the Son of David. Source: New Living Translation Study Bible notes. Isaiah 11:1-10 describes the ...


4

OK, I admit these are not explicitly Christian examples, but I would submit that they clearly demonstrate the difference between knowledge, understanding and wisdom. Example 1: Knowledge: you know when you press the "on" button, that the computer activates. Understanding: you know that after pressing the "on" button, the electricity from the power grid ...


4

Isaiah 1:10-12 tells us that those words were addressed to the rulers and priests. These people were to judge cases brought before them righteously, in the "courts," as it says in verse 12. But they have not sought justice, punished the oppressors, nor sided to help the widows who have no husbands to defend them and help them. Verses 21-26 tells us about ...


4

Jehovah's witnesses does not believe there are multiple gods. They believe there are only one God. Some verses, like the one we are discussing about may be confusing, indeed. According to JW, Jesus is not THE God, but referred as a god. This is because of his role in God's plan. http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200002451#h=20:90-20:883 For more ...


4

Regardless of later usage, exegesis should look at the original language and the likely original meaning of a text. In the original Hebrew, Isaiah 7:14 uses the word 'almah, which means 'young woman' and is used only in this sense in nine other references in the Old Testament. The Hebrew word for 'virgin' is betulah and is used exclusively in that sense ...


4

The basic idea is that of "smiting oneself." As Howard Marshall puts it, commenting on Luke 18:13: The breast or heart is regarded as the seat of sin, and hence the act is one of grief or contrition.1 As alluded to here, in the Hebrew background of the expression lies the word for "heart" (Heb. leb or lebab). Nahum 2:7 is a good example:2 ... her ...


4

The epithet "Lord of Heavenly Forces" translates yhwh ṣĕbāʾôt. The phrase consists of the name yhwh – the tetragrammaton – in construct with the plural noun ṣĕbāʾôt, traditionally "hosts" (e.g. BDB צבא, section 4c beginning at the top of the second column). According to one commentator:* The noun [ṣĕbāʾôt] has probably an abstract meaning ...


4

The translation asserting that Deity 'is persecuted' appears to come from the KJV of 1611. Neither the Coverdale 1535, The Matthew's 1537, The Great Bible 1539, The Geneva Bible 1560 or The Bishop's Bible 1568 have that rendering. The Webster of 1833 follows the KJV in that place. Neither Young's Literal Translation nor Green's Literal Translation follow ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible