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Why intermarriage with Canaanites was forbidden It says in Exodus: Observe what I command you today. See, I will drive out before you the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites. Take care not to make a covenant with the inhabitants of the land to which you are going, or it will become a snare among you. You ...


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It's important to keep in mind that the stories about the patriarchs are both stories about individuals and "national origin" stories giving an identity to the whole nation of Israel. So in the case of Jacob (also known as Israel), the promises get borne out (a) in his great success as a herdsman for his uncle Laban, accumulating a huge amount of personal ...


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God hates human sacrifice. Let no one be found among you who sacrifices their son or daughter in the fire, who practices divination or sorcery, interprets omens, engages in witchcraft. (Deuteronomy 18:10, NIV) God was only testing Abraham's faith and obedience. Genesis 22 (NIV) 1 Some time later God tested Abraham. He said to him, “Abraham!” ...


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In his monograph entitled The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, Dr. Richard D. Patterson observes that in the pivotal event in Israel's history when Elijah confronted the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel, Elijah invoked the formulaic or motivic words you have drawn our attention to: “O Lord, God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, let it be known this day that ...


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One approach to this passage is to look at it generally literally, as Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown do. Regarding verse 28, they emphasize the fruitfulness of Canaan: To an Oriental mind, this phraseology implied the highest flow of prosperity. The copious fall of dew is indispensable to the fruitfulness of lands, which would be otherwise arid and sterile ...


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