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9

The salvation of infants within Protestant denominations cover a wide range of alternate views. The subject is closely related to different view of infant baptism but not identical. To avoid the subject of how baptism has its role in the subject, I would like to limit the scenario to a child that dies before having a chance of being baptized. To keep ...


8

No, in Protestant understanding infant baptism does not in itself affect an infants' soul. The same goes for adult baptism actually. The rite of baptism itself is not seen as having any direct effect on the eternal status of the soul. It's primarily a visible acknowledgement that God has made a promise and a reminder of how Christs atonement works. In the ...


8

Paedobaptism is the practice of baptising infants. The Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Churches, Coptic and Oriental Orthodox Churches, Lutheran Churches, Anglican and Episcopal Churches baptise infants. Credobaptism, or adult baptism, is the practice of baptising only believers. Baptists and Anabaptists, as well as many nondenominational ...


7

I'll address the two main questions from a Roman Catholic perspective: Question 1: Does baptizing the baby have anything to do with the destination of the infant’s soul? Short answer: Yes. Long answer: Baptism is normally a prerequisite for entering heaven, BUT There are other forms of baptism besides water baptism, AND At least one of those (the baptism ...


7

There are two ways of preventing miscarriages (spontaneous abortions): Not conceiving at all by abstaining from sexual intercourse (allowed) by contracepting (forbidden) Treating the underlying medical cause of recurrent miscarriage (allowed) If #1 is intended, yet the husband and wife still engage in the marriage act, this is contraception, and the ...


6

Your hypothetical developing baby's first sin was disobeying God in eating the forbidden fruit. On a more fundamental level, you are conflating two different concepts here. According to Reformed Theology (and indeed most branches of Protestantism) there are two different concepts in play here. Original sin, or the state in which we are born is different ...


5

Abraham's Circumcision First of all, we must differentiate between Abraham's circumcision and the circumcision of the covenant that applied to Abraham's descendants and household. They are still the same circumcision, but Abraham is a unique case because he was the first to receive it. Colossians and the answer you quote are speaking of Abraham's ...


5

The enquiry is about the policy of Protestant denominations on the choice of baptismal names. I am an ordained minister (Presbyter) of the British Methodist Church with thirty years' experience. In the Methodist Church, this matter would be up to the judgment of the officiating minister's conscience, though parents could appeal to superior authorities in ...


5

All salvation is inherently unjust. No one deserves salvation. Eph 2:1-9 (NASB) And you were dead in your trespasses and sins, in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit that is now working in the sons of disobedience. Among them we too all formerly lived in the ...


5

Firstly, we need to know that God is just and fair. God is just: He will pay back trouble to those who trouble you. (2 Thessalonians 1:6, NIV) But you are stubborn and refuse to turn to God. So you are making things even worse for yourselves on that day when he will show how angry he is and will judge the world with fairness. (Romans 2:5, ...


5

The color white is primarily symbolic of the pure state of the baby's/adult's soul along with the renewal of life after being cleansed of original sin by the Holy Spirit. But as with all symbolism, there are many more things associated with the color (according to Wikipedia): According to surveys in Europe and the United States, white is the color most ...


5

Because it is Tradition. Exactly why the Tradition started, I don't know, but here is a present-day explanation for why to do it: In the Orthodox Church when a child is baptized they are also Chrismated, which I guess is similar to a Catholic Christening. It is for sealing them to protect against evil spirits and such. The Baptism / Chrismation is the 2-...


5

The Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity says, in its entry on "Child": Christians took in these exposed children to save them, though often they could do nothing more than bury them, as the tombs of many children and inscriptions in the catacombs attest (Diehl II, 142–143); in some cases consecrated virgins (Aug., Ep. 98) or benevolent wealthy families ...


4

It's instructive here to look at the etymology of "christening". It is, obviously, derived from the word Christ. Here's what the Online Etymology Dictionary has to say about christen: christen (v.) c.1200, from Old English cristnian "to baptize," literally "to make Christian," from cristen "Christian". General meaning ...


4

Jesus' remarks were that those who would receive his teachings would be like little children. Also see the Beatitudes, which provides more detail about the simple childlike faith (my words) of those that would receive him (meek, pure in heart, peacemakers, etc.). The Kingdom of God belongs to those who can accept Christ in the same way a little child simply ...


4

Faith Lutheran Church - Symbols and Meaning on Page 12 The Scallop Shell – (at six points around the edge of the bowl). John is said to have baptized Jesus with water from a scallop shell and it has been used as a symbol of baptism since then. I can find no biblical evidence for the scallop shell to be associated with it but did find sermons where a pastor ...


4

Those who baptize infants are bound by Canon Law to raise those children Catholic. A Catholic parent must Can. 1125 1/…do all in his or her power so that all offspring are baptized and brought up in the Catholic Church. Thus, unless the Catholic parents utterly fail in their duty, it is nearly impossible for a child to be baptized Catholic and not ...


3

According to Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) and the New Church, all infants and children who die before they are adults go to heaven and are raised there until they grow up and become angels themselves. This, Swedenborg says, is true whether or not they have been baptized, and no matter where or in what religion they were born. Baptism, Swedenborg says, ...


3

Although the triple pouring is required for lawful baptism in the Western Rites of the Catholic church, it does not seem to be required for validity. (Source: Moral Theology by Fr. Heribert Jone, a book that was recommended to me by a traditional Catholic priest, and which I therefore consider reliable.) So if one or even two of the pourings miss the ...


3

This seems to be only the practice in Georgia by the Patriarch there. Both are immersed because that is how Ilia II decided to baptize them. Ilia II, recognised as the Patriarch of the Georgian Orthodox Church, carried out the baptisms of 780 babies at the Trinity Cathedral last Friday ... The baptism sees each baby's head dipped in holy water, before ...


3

With regard to this particular verse there is nothing to explain beyond a very understandable misreading of a grammatical ambiguity. The KJV has "teach all nations, baptizing them". The word "teach" is a translation of the Greek word mathetosate. The NIV translates this as "make disciples of," bringing out a somewhat stronger meaning of the verb. It is ...


2

For us Catholics our believe is that original sin came into being through the fall of one man(Adam) and through the only lamb of GOD(JESUS) who washes away the sins of the whole world with his death and resurrection on mount Calvary mankind was restored and have redemption which includes free from original sin too. And now scripture have it that who so ever ...


2

When the Scripture is seemingly silent on any particular topic that is of concern to the Christian church generally, there is a temptation to wonder why God was not "clearer" concerning this or that issue or question. When this occurs, a better course of action is to remember that while the Scripture is very specific on some things, a great deal of its ...


2

Not a lot to add to the verses above (Gospel references to Jesus welcoming children, household baptisms in Acts & 1 Corinthians, the parallel with circumcision), but a few comments. (a) The Bible comes to us as a whole. 2 Timothy 3.16 makes clear that all is inspired and profitable that we may be equipped for every good work. Therefore, be cautious about ...


2

I am not a canon lawyer, and do not play one on the internet, but a quick review of the relevant bits of the catechism and code of canon law suggests to me that the baptism is valid, even if it can be actually proved one of the instances of pouring water really did miss completely, because the intent to perform the sacrament is there, and the frailty of the ...


2

The simple answer is that God does things outside of our human comprehension. Jesus was 100% God and 100% man, at the same time. He was not split. He was not 50% God and 50% man. Because of that, he was not imparted original sin. Without original sin, Jesus could not be totally depraved. How was he not imparted original sin? Like I said, it's outside of our ...


2

See John Piper's article: What happens to infants who die? All infants are sinners (Romans 5:12-21) "At least" Some infants are saved: John the Baptist (Luke 1:15), David (Psalm 22:9-10). Those not capable of perceiving good and evil are not guilty of sinful acts (John 9:41, Romans 1:20). God is good (Psalm 119:68). Trust that he will do what is just and ...


2

My first thought on reading this question was whether it was in the right forum. Should this be part of the Hermeneutics or Christianity site? But then I considered that interpretation of the text and more general reflection on the meaning of baptism are both necessary, so the question fits well in either place. In Matthew 28.19-20 the relevant part of Jesus'...


2

John Wycliffe's views on this subject don't seem to be quite as straight forward as was portrayed in the movie you refer to, but he did tend in this direction more than those of his day. We must begin by putting the question in its historical context: there was little debate at the time over the fate of baptized infants. The fate of unbaptized infants who ...


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