8

The O.P. asks about the Catholic position regarding the “emotions” of God, especially as found in the Old Testament. Based both on Scripture and sound philosophical principles, the Church holds that strictly speaking God (in His Divine Nature) does not have emotions in the same sense that human beings do, for the simple reason that He is not a human being. ...


7

The point Edwards makes here is that since God accomplishes his purposes in all things, even evil things, he cannot be said to be carried away by emotions and thus experience involuntary ecstasy or distress. But Edwards clearly admits that God can feel pleasure – the crucial point being that God, not the creature, is its ultimate source: Though he has real ...


2

This short 2015 First Things magazine article The Impassible God of the Bible - Replying to Some Objections mentions one potential objection to the passibility of God. Concluding paragraph: Put positively, because the Christian God is radically transcendent (which “impassibility” gestures toward), therefore God can take human nature to himself without ...


1

It's important to keep in mind that Divine Simplicity, Divine Impassibility, and Penal Substitutionary Atonement are man-made theological constructs which attempt to codify the vast depth of God's revelation, making it easier to remember and apply but not necessarily fully encompassing all of God. We have been united with the mind of Christ but we are not ...


1

I would think that impassibility refers not to God's inability to become incarnate and experience suffering, or simply life as a man in that nature, but to God's invulnerability to pre-existing phenomena or laws of any kind, of which suffering if merely an instance or example. Suffering usually comes from some form of punishment, survival mechanisms, etc., ...


1

The themes are actually handled no different by Edwards or Reformed Theologians then they are by other Christian denominantions. Theologians generally do not mean that God has no feelings when saying that he is 'unchanging in his perfect boundless joy'. From the standpoint of impassibility, Edwards is not opposing the same concept detailed by Thomas Aquinas (...


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