8

Writings Very early. At least as early as Justin Martyr, in The First Apology (~AD 150): For they proclaim our madness to consist in this, that we give to a crucified man a place second to the unchangeable and eternal God, the Creator of all; for they do not discern the mystery that is herein, to which, as we make it plain to you, we pray you to give ...


6

God's unchanging nature is something fundamental in scripture, before there ever was a church council or New Testament tradition. It is not based on a Greek concept of perfection but a biblical concept of God. For I the Lord do not change (ESV, Malachi 3:6) To ask when it first showed up in church father writings would probably be the same as asking when ...


6

You misunderstand the model. But it's a common misunderstanding. One that comes up often enough that there's a standard answer from Apologetics. Here is is in my words: The statement that God doesn't change means that His nature doesn't change. His Nature includes many attributes that never change: Goodness, holiness, He is Just, Righteous, and ...


4

No Pope has made such claim, but he wouldn't need to. As Hebrews says, Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, Just because one does not have a face to face encounter does not mean that God has not spoken to them. Very few of the prophets claim they saw God's face. Indeed, Elijah perceived him only as a "...


2

Not God the Father apparently, but perhaps Jesus. In Anatomy of the Vatican, page 20-21, Paul Hoffman says that in 1954, towards the end of his life, Pope Pius XII reported to some Jesuits that Jesus had appeared at his bedside during a recent illness and said to him that his time was not yet up. When the story found its way into the press, the Vatican had ...


2

This might be a hard one for us temporal creatures to get our head around, and it actually isn't just the incarnation that poses this problem. Viewed from a temporal perspective, we could just as well say: "Before creation, God wasn't a creator - after creation, he became one. How can this be consistent with the idea of God's immutability?" The only logical ...


1

While different Christian groups might answer this differently, the vast majority today are Chalcedonian Trinitarians. I will answer the question from that perspective. When it is said that God does not change, this means that God's essence, His nature does not change. The Second Person of the Trinity assumed the Human nature uniting it in His Person. So in ...


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