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25

The branches come from difference in opinion. Here is a diagram showing where Christianity diverged. Image source From the beginning Christianity diverged from Judaism1: where Christianity emphasizes correct belief (or orthodoxy), focusing on the New Covenant as mediated through Jesus Christ, as recorded in the New Testament. Judaism places emphasis on ...


17

Such a simple question, and so difficult to provide a simple answer! Probably the main reasons for Christianity dividing into branches and sects are: (a) issues of dogma: disagreements about points of doctrine some of which seem with hindsight to be incredibly hair-splitting, such as the precise relationship between Jesus' physical nature as a man and his ...


11

Just because it's called the Book of Enoch doesn't mean it's written by him. It's considered one of Pseudopigraphical book, literally "false attribution" (See: Pseudepigrapha (Wikipedia). The subsequent description was taken from the IVP Dictionary of New Testament Background, Entry: Enoch, Books Of. 1 Enoch consists of 5 distinct compositions: Book of ...


11

The other answers here are good, but I'll try to directly address some questions with more detail. And this is the sort of question where a lot of answers are "it's complicated, and no one perspective is correct." As you stated, there are three "main branches" of Christianity, with most branches and sub-branches claiming to be the one, holy, catholic, and ...


8

The consensus of modern scholarship is well described in the wikipedia article to which the question refers. Most scholars are committed to a view that the Old Testament for the most part contains myth possibly to bolster/justify Jewish claims on the land of Israel. Many are also committed to the Wellhausen Documentary Hypothesis or similar derivatives. ...


8

Were birthdays celebrated by believers? The answer would turn on one's definition of "celebrate". Does "celebrate" mean only the inclusion of cake, ice cream, balloons, streamers, presents, friends, and family singing songs, showing pictures, opening presents, pinning the tail on the donkey, and blowing out candles? Or how "celebrate" means only about ...


7

See: What Does "Bible" Mean and How Did it Get That Name? Origin of the word: The word Bible itself is simply a transliteration of the Greek word bíblos (βίβλος), meaning "book." So the Bible is, quite simply, The Book. However, take a step further back and the same Greek word also means "scroll" or "parchment." Of course, the first words of ...


6

This is a quite fascinating question, where we can speculate to our hearts' content! First, it must be pointed out that the New Living Translation you have quoted is dogmatic in its assertion that it was "about noontime". The text merely states it was "at about the sixth hour". Commentators point out it is very difficult to know if John's Gospel means the ...


6

According to scripture, God revealed himself in the beginning by creating. In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. [Genesis 1:1, KJV.] Then God revealed himself to humanity, by speaking. And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: [Genesis 2:16, KJV.] God revealed himself to Adam, ...


6

Interesting question, but where to start? It’s a big ask! The Wikipedia diagram provided by depperm is a very useful illustration showing the timeline and emergence of the different major branches within Christianity. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Christian_denominations_by_number_of_members However, if “all” you want is a brief, easily ...


6

Is the sign of the Cross as well as the crucifix a Catholic “trade mark”? The Catholic Church does not have a trade mark on this subject, but the sign of the cross, crosses and crucifixes are extremely popular in the liturgy and in private devotions. The Crucifix is a visual reminder for the Catholic faithful of the enormous price Jesus paid for our ...


5

You ask, how did scripture get the name Bible? Etymology: Middle English Bible "the Bible," from early French Bible (same meaning), from Latin biblia (same meaning), from Greek biblia (plural) "books," derived from Byblos, ancient city in Phoenicia from which the Greeks imported papyrus. - Bible (Student Dictionary) Here is a brief extract from a ...


5

In the New Testament, Jesus never prescribes or approves of any particular canon Jesus doesn't anywhere speak of the canon,1 except to refer to common ways of dividing them: "the Law and the Prophets" (Matthew 5:17), "the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms" (Luke 24:44; cf. 24:27). This latter one is significant for our purpose becaues among the Jews, the ...


4

TL;DR: An Anglican is neither then nor today permitted to be godparent at a Catholic baptism. The then actual Code of Canon Law 1917 (Codex Iuris Canonici, CIC) says: Can. 765 CIC/1917 Ut quis sit patrinus, oportet: [...] 2° Ad nullam pertineat haereticam aut schismaticam sectam, [...]; (my translation) can. 765 In order to be ...


4

The emphasis on individual choice may not be a distinctly Protestant characteristic, but it is certainly a biblical one. In both the New- and Old Covenants the biblical truth is that human choice is an important element in each true believer's faith walk, regardless of denomination or lack thereof. Joshua's words ring just as true today as they did when ...


4

The earliest reference I can find to individuals confessing their faith in Christ and asking to be baptised (as an adult believer) thereby making a personal choice, dates back to the early 16th century when the Anabaptists rejected infant baptism and went about re-baptising adults who had previously been baptised as infants: The early Anabaptists ...


4

From the Bible, we can be pretty sure that Jesus was not born on December 25. Late September or early October, perhaps even on the first day of the Feast of Tabernacles, is the most likely time. Here is an part of an essay written elsewhere, in which I summarized the birth date: Though it seldom snows there, December in Jerusalem is a cold and wet time. ...


4

A simple text search of the Bible on BibleGateway returns 3 references in the King James Version: And it came to pass the third day, which was Pharaoh's birthday, that he made a feast unto all his servants: and he lifted up the head of the chief butler and of the chief baker among his servants. -- Genesis 40:20 But when Herod's birthday was kept,...


4

I’ve done my best to address three of your sub-questions: Why do we have Christianity if Jesus was a Jew? God has always called prophets to teach the inhabitants of the earth (His children). These teachings always focused on Jesus Christ (the Jehovah of the Old Testament, the Messiah of the New Testament) because only through Jesus Christ can we be saved ...


3

The Bible gives no information on the birth date of Jesus. So we do not know if Jesus' birth date was December 25 and any date is speculation. However, the Bible is clear that Jesus was born and so it is appropriate to accept that as fact. While some condemn the practice of celebrating His birth at the time of Christmas, failing to recognize the event as ...


3

What was the language that Enoch spoke and did the Book of Enoch get written 3000 years BC and is there any proof or carbon dating of that? Let us start with what language Enoch possible spoke. There is no firm proof of what language Enoch actually spoke. But several hypotheses do exist. One possible hypothesis comes from what else Wikipedia: The ...


3

The basic assumption, "I'd imagine that if Christ directly taught the doctrine of the Real Presence, then one of the Gospels would have recorded it. So given that fact that it isn't directly taught, let us assume for the sake of argument that Christ did not explicitly teach this doctrine.", should be changed to "Since scripture depicts Jesus directly ...


3

One example is omitted by the other answer (argument from silence inherent therein notwithstanding). Job 1:4-5 And his sons would have a feast every man on his [birth]day at his own house, and would call for their three sisters to eat and drink with them. And when the days of the feast were concluded, Job would sanctify them, rising early in the morning ...


3

According to catholic-hierarchy.org Carlo Maria Viganò was ordained as priest of the diocese of Pavia on 24th of March 1968. So he was a (normal) diocesan priest before becoming bishop and is no member of any order.


3

Did Jesus reject the apocrypha? Nowhere in Sacred Scripture has Our Lord rejected the Apocrypha. Who has the authority to declare what is Apocrypha and what is not? The comment of Lucian is quite revealing to say the least. If such a rejection would indeed have existed, then the presence of references to pious pseudepigraphical works on an even lower ...


3

Were non-Vulgate Scriptural readings ever used at the pre-Vatican II Mass? I believe the answer to this question to be yes. If we count the lawful liturgical variants of the Tridentine Mass such as the Dominican Rite and the Carmelite Rite and permission given to some Religious Orders, we able to see that the Holy See has given various indults for the ...


3

What is the basis for believing that 40 lashes would be deadly (especially in Roman law or jurisprudence)? This is a false assumption! For one thing, the Romans were not limited in the number of strokes they could mete out. True some died under the sentence of flagellation, but historians generally do not give the number of strokes applied. In the ...


2

How has Roman Catholic Confession changed throughout the centuries? I know that this question deals with the 16th century on, but I would like to give a little background first. According to the Council of Trent, the consensus of all the Fathers always understood that by the words of Christ just cited, the power of forgiving and retaining sins was ...


2

I ran across mention of this letter and did some sleuthing. I have no idea where the claims to copies being in various libraries came from, but I did manage to track down its publication in English. It's printed in The Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 8. Edited by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1916.) ...


2

One of the earliest records of celebrating Christ's birthday is from St. Theophilus (✝181 AD), bishop of Cæsarea, who wrote: We ought to celebrate the birthday of our Lord on what day soever the 25th of December shall happen. Magdeburgenses, Cent. 2. c. 6. Hospinian, De origine Festorum Chirstianorum. cited in: Taylor R. Marshall, God’s Birthday: Why ...


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