Hot answers tagged

43

Where was Jesus from his age 12 to 33? From age 12 to 30 he was in Nazareth. And from age 30 to 33 he was in and around Jerusalem. Where else? And no, he was not in India. Why does scripture not mention this period in Jesus' life? Because scriptures are not biographies of Christ. Their intention and purpose was different. They wanted to record the story ...


28

It has happened to the present Pope. Dr. Anca-Maria Cernea, Doctor at the Center for Diagnosis and Treatment-Victor Babes and President of the Association of Catholic Doctors of Bucharest (Romania) made the following speech to the Fourteenth Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, at which the Pope was present, on Friday 16 October 2015. The ...


27

Of course this is more of a historical-archeological question as the Bible does not directly answer but I have stumbled across a fairly convincing argument that would place Thutmose II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Exodus. I first came across the argument in Alfred Edersheim’s Bible History. He typically pays attention to ancient monuments and secular ...


26

The Apostles Creed, referenced as early as 390 A.D., quite clearly articulates an understanding of our faith revolving around the three persons we identify as the members of the Trinity as core to the faith. It makes up almost half of the total text. I believe in God, the Father Almighty,    the Maker of heaven and earth,    ...


26

Ritual cleansing was a common part of some Jewish sects around the turn of the era. One of the best examples of this (that I know of) comes from Khirbet Qumran (where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found)—where there were found several miqvot (sn. miqveh) used for a sort of "baptism." It is commonly held that the people living at Qumran were Essenes, and some ...


25

In short Lucian Pliny the younger Josephus St. Ignatius of Antioch Tacitus Suetonius Aristides Galenus Lampridius I tried to get all those that Norman names. Just a problem with spelling those wholly foreign names. You can find all 19 of them in the video though. It is curious to note that even Tacitus who was a rather big critic of the early church ...


22

Important Question What purpose could the prohibition against drunkenness possibly have to a group of people who were unable to get drunk? If the wine wasn't really wine, then how could they get drunk? Noah certainly got drunk and appears to have passed out from wine. This could be the result of wine fermenting faster in the post-flood environment than ...


22

Eusebius of Caesarea's Church History talks a bit about this. He says St. Philip, at least, had 4 daughters and Sts. Peter and Paul had wives. Clement, indeed, whose words we have just quoted, after the above-mentioned facts gives a statement, on account of those who rejected marriage, of the apostles that had wives. "Or will they," says he, "reject ...


22

This is a good recent blog post covering Pope Benedict's thoughts on the matter. The key is the date set for the annunciation (March 25th): Traditionally held to be the first day of creation Traditionally held to be the date when Abraham was to sacrifice Isaac after a 3 day journey to Mount Moriah Extrapolated to be the date of Jesus' annunciation (when ...


22

This is a fairly common question, and there is a very good answer. A detailed answer can be found here and here. These are some of the highlights. It is important to note that Luke mentions that the census to which he is referring is the first census taken while Quirinius was governing. This seems to indicate that at the time of writing, the readers ...


21

Yes, he did. The Romans were experts at this and knew exactly what it took to kill someone and what it took to make that process slow. Crucifixion was designed to drag the act of dying out over a long period of time. As you note in the John passage, Jesus died more quickly than they expected. The trial and execution had been rushed into an abnormal ...


21

The testimonies of these "lists of witnesses" is included in the introduction to the Book of Mormon, in which they explain what they saw and experienced. From the testimony of the Three Witnesses: And we also testify that we have seen the engravings which are upon the plates; and they have been shown unto us by the power of God, and not of man. And ...


21

During the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 AD the city was destroyed almost down to the bedrock with not a stone left atop another, just as Jesus had predicted. Jews were forbidden to enter the city for a long time afterward. This also applied to a small Jewish dissent group called "Christians". This forced everybody (who were alive) to leave Jerusalem and move to ...


20

Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, and Zealots were the four primary religious/political factions of the time. Pharisees were keepers of the Law and held the entire (what we would call) Hebrew Bible as the word of YHWH. They emerged from the exile as the dominant faction because they (correctly) connected Israel's abandoning of the Law as the reason for the ...


19

At the time of Jesus, and even for many centuries before, Aramaic was the vernacular or common everyday language. The Tanakh is mostly in Hebrew (in particular, the Torah) but there are a few Aramaic sections - notably, in Daniel. Hebrew was therefore the "high" language of religion but Aramaic was the "low" language of normal life. (Hellenized Jews would ...


19

While this is easy enough to answer from a Reformed point of view, I'd like to start by pointing out that the felt need for extra-Biblical statements on matters of faith is not limited to Reformed circles or even Protestantism. In fact they are common to all traditions and sects in Christendom.1 Even your most run-of-the-mill non-denominational half-baked-...


19

It's very easy to look back thousands of years, once time has had plenty of time to change things, and say that there's no evidence for something and so it must be false. But it's a very different matter when there aren't thousands of years in the way. The Gospels were written in the first century AD, by people who experienced it personally, to their ...


19

Newton did indeed have issues with Handel's Messiah, so much so that in 1784–85 he gave a series of 50 sermons at his own church (St. Mary Woolnoth) in response to the oratorio being played at Westminster Abbey as part of a commemoration festival of Handel's 100th birthday. His stated goal was to preach on the Scriptural passages found in the lyrics of the ...


18

"Chronograph" 1 – a document dating to 354 AD 2 in Rome: This was a list of martyrs and their birth dates, and a list of bishops of Rome and their birth dates. The Chronograph lists these dates (birth dates) in calendar order. The first date listed is the "8th of Kalens of January" ("Kalens" is used to refer to the first of a month – putting a number in ...


18

First, actually, it was very likely that Jesus and His followers spoke no fewer than these three languages: Aramaic, Greek, and Hebrew. What language did Jesus speak? Aramaic was the primary language of the land, Greek was the language of business, education, and for communication with foreigners (because it was a wide-spread language), and Hebrew was the ...


18

The existing answer provides a learned and fascinating discussion for tracing the interpretative history of Isaiah 52:13-53:12 (often conveniently abbreviated to "Isaiah 53", the so-called "Fourth Servant Song") from roughly the 1st C. CE. Thus, the conclusion... We can ... be confident that first century converts to Christianity did not invent the idea ...


18

This question is complicated, of course, by the fact that we must work with translations of the original texts in order to find this wording. However, at least three second-century authors use this phrasing when translated into English: Justin Martyr, Athenagoras of Athens, and Clement of Alexandria. Justin Martyr (100–165) writes, in Dialogue with Trypho:...


17

Mainstream Christianity - Catholicism, Orthodox, and the various Protestant denominations, God doesn't have a form. He is spirit, omnipresent, and not confined to a single place. He doesn't have a form. (Although He could manifest one and speak through it, such as a burning bush...) Of course, when He came to earth as Christ (as mainstream Christianity ...


17

tl;dr> It began in the Council of Jersualem (55 AD), but was cemented by the destruction of the Temple in 70AD. 1. Gentiles were released from Jewish custom The divergence is clearly articulated in Acts 15 - at the "Council of Jerusalem," often pegged at 50 AD - roughly 20 years after the Crucifixion. Acts 15 sets up the situation as follows: Certain ...


17

The short answer to the question is: in museums and libraries throughout the world. The sheer number of fragments alone means that no one academic entity - let alone even one government or ecclesiastical authority - can "own" them all. There are over 5500 manuscripts, miniscules, unicals, papyri, parchments, and fragments that critical scholars have used ...


17

He most likely was crucified naked - this is consistent with the biblical narrative of the guards casting lots for his garment and with standard historical practice. In the paintings, the artists wanted to preserve some of the dignity and not turn the Lord's body into something that puerile youngsters might be titilated by. It is a condescension to the ...


17

I got most of this information by perusing Wikipedia. Simon Peter (brother of Andrew) - traditionally said to be buried in Rome, under St. Peter's Basilica. The tomb dates between 130 and 300. James (son of Zebedee and older brother of John) also called "James the Greater" - as the patron saint of Spain, he is said to have been buried in Santiago de ...


16

Lining up dates from ancient documents and inscriptions is not an easy thing to do. You don't find ancient records that say, "Our nation was established on June 12, 3462 BC", for the simple reason that our modern calendar did not exist back then. So even when an ancient source gives a date, it is in the calendar they used at the time, and historians have to ...


16

Without doing too much digging and research I can think of one example. In Matthew 2 the priests and teachers of the law knew that the Christ was to be born in Bethelehem as per their interpretation of the prophecy in Micah 5. Matthew 2:3-6 (ESV) 3 When Herod the king heard this, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him; 4 and assembling all the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible