43

Where was Jesus from his age 12 to 33? From age 12 to 30 he was in Nazareth. And from age 30 to 33 he was in and around Jerusalem. Where else? And no, he was not in India. Why does scripture not mention this period in Jesus' life? Because scriptures are not biographies of Christ. Their intention and purpose was different. They wanted to record the story ...


31

Jesus read Isaiah 61 in a synagogue: Luke 4:16-22 (ESV) 16  And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. And as was his custom, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and he stood up to read. 17  And the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written, ... 20&...


23

That Christ's hands were nailed to the cross is firmly established by Scripture. Following the Resurrection, the Apostle Thomas doubted that Christ was alive: So he [Thomas] said to them, "Unless I see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe." (John 20:25, NKJV) ...


22

This is a fairly common question, and there is a very good answer. A detailed answer can be found here and here. These are some of the highlights. It is important to note that Luke mentions that the census to which he is referring is the first census taken while Quirinius was governing. This seems to indicate that at the time of writing, the readers ...


20

The question "Was Jesus a Rabbi" is covered here. Short version: Yes, He was. The question "Was Jesus a carpenter" is covered here. Short version, "yes, but in typical fashion people dispute the exact meaning of the word, which could also be translated as craftsman." In this case, whether carpenter could mean craftsman or stonemason or whatever other ...


18

Logically, there are two possibilities: either Jesus himself said such things or they were added to the tradition at a later date. Neither view offers a clear-cut explanation, so a wide variety of ideas for the "secretive" passages have been offered by Christian commentators and Bible scholars over the years. Jesus did not tell anyone to remain quiet ...


17

With regards to ethnicity and geography, the direct answer to this is a big Yes, it is wrong. Bethlehem is in Palestine, Asia. The borders of this nation is the red sea, Egypt, Lebanon Jordan, the Dead Sea and Syria, (varied with time). The closest picture we could estimate should be that of an Arab or middle eastern. Theories that Jesus was European were ...


17

The life of Jesus is recorded separately in four different books of the Bible. These four books are collectively called The Gospels. Some of them record details of Jesus early life and some do not: Matthew - Records His birth and then a visit from the wise men before fleeing from Herod to Egypt. The book then skips to His baptism as an adult. Mark - ...


17

He most likely was crucified naked - this is consistent with the biblical narrative of the guards casting lots for his garment and with standard historical practice. In the paintings, the artists wanted to preserve some of the dignity and not turn the Lord's body into something that puerile youngsters might be titilated by. It is a condescension to the ...


15

The following information is from John Dickson's The Christ Files, which is available as both a book and a DVD. There are several early records which are thought by many historians to refer to Jesus. Here are three of the earliest. With only a sentence or two, sometimes the identifications aren't perfectly clear, and some of them are debated. As with ...


14

There is a third possibility: He wasn't an ordained Rabbi. He was called rabbi out of sense of respect and he was allowed in the synagogues because of his fame. When he preached at a synagogue it says - Luke 4:20 "The eyes of everyone in the synagogue were fastened on him." This suggests to me an event like that of a visiting celebrity than a routine ...


12

The Bible gives no physical description of Jesus in the sense of describing his skin tone, hair style, etc. I am not aware of any description in other ancient documents. (If anyone knows of one, please tell us. I'd love to hear about it.) Jesus' mother was Jewish and his father was the Holy Spirit. As the implication is that he indeed inherited genetic ...


12

There are two places in scripture where people are surprised to discover that Jesus is in a house, probably his or his family's. The first place is where Mary and Joseph are living when the wise men follow the star to them. Jesus is not an infant at this point, but a 'young child' (2 years approx., according to Herod's death warrant) and the wise men ...


12

That professor hasn't read the Bible, apparently. Eyewitness Account Luke 1:1-4 (my translation) Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compose a narrative of the things which have taken place among us, (even as it was handed on to us by those who were eyewitnesses from the beginning, and those who tended to [the matter of preserving] an account), it ...


11

Jesus being a carpenter is subject to debate among historians and Christians alike. There is no actual Scriptural evidence that Jesus ever was a "carpenter", however based on the times He grew up in it is an easy inference. If He truly was a carpenter, then there may be artifacts created by him circulating somewhere. However, it's a good bet to say these ...


10

From the Gospel of John, we learn that He wore sandals: "...He is the one who comes after me, the thongs of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie.” John 1:27 He also wore a single piece undergarment, and apparently four other items of clothing: When the soldiers crucified Jesus, they took his clothes, dividing them into four shares, one for each of ...


10

The most commonsensical explanation of the Messianic Secret is simple self preservation - not necessarily self preservation in the literal sense, but in terms of the mission of Jesus. He couldn't do what he was trying to do if it became well known that he was the messiah. In the time in which Jesus lived, Palestine was under Roman occupation. Jesus was ...


10

The Holy of Holies, or the Most Holy Place, was separated from the outter room (the Holy Place) by the veil. Only the High Priest could go beyond the veil into the Most Holy Place, but other priests could enter the Holy Place. Thus any priest at the Temple would have been able to see it. The non-priest Levites may have also been able to enter the Holy Place ...


9

Times change, and the exact measure that defines "literacy" changes with them. The concept of an "essay" would have been unknown in Jesus' day, but it is quite clear from the record of we have of his interaction with other learned men that he was treated as if he was educated. As we learn from the verses quoted in parap's answer he was clearly able to read ...


9

Jesus was called Rabbi (Teacher of the Law of Moses) by the Jews. John 3:1-2 (NIV) Now there was a Pharisee, a man named Nicodemus who was a member of the Jewish ruling council. He came to Jesus at night and said, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher who has come from God. For no one could perform the signs you are doing if God were not with him.” ...


9

Even if the premise that Christ had longer hair is true, it would not matter as that is not the point of this passage. If it is read in context i.e. read the chapter before and after, it is clear that Paul is talking about how Jewish customs and how even though they are no longer necessary due to Christ's sacrifice, they should still be observed if you are ...


8

2000 years ago in the Roman occupied Jewish world, people who were called rabbi generally had real jobs on the side. There were no organized rabinnic seminaries back then, but leading rabbis generally had disciples (Hillel and Shammai had many), and a rabbi could ordain his students when he thought they had learned enough. Whether that ordination was ...


8

Yes it is wrong, in this day and age where everyone is on the internet and information is readily available, there is no excuse for ignorance. With just a few searches anyone can find out about the groups of people living in the Roman controlled Greek Kingdom of Judea. Jesus' mother was not 'jewish' as a lot of what westerners consider jewish are actually ...


8

You are right, communication before modern electronics relied more on the speaker yelling and a crowd who surrounding attentively. Consider the ancient Roman coliseum for example. This place could house an audience of 50,000+ and people would need to shout loud to the crowd and be heard. When we imagine the crowds that Jesus spoke to a typical Jesus ...


7

The answer to your question 'Did Jesus wear tsitsiyot?' is, yes he did. We can know this by looking at a few things: Jesus (Yeshua) was a Jew born in first-century Israel (Matthew 1 & 2): Matthew 1:1-17 (ESV) — 1 The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham ... Matthew 2:1 (ESV) — 2 Now after Jesus was born in ...


7

It is indeed possible to calculate, within a few hours, the timings of full moons in the first century. Stochastic variations mean we cannot be more accurate. The question asks whether we can apply the knowledge that there was a full moon on Nisan 14 to narrow down the possible years it could have been. Unfortunately this does not help. This is because ...


6

Being as there is no image of Jesus that has any historical credibility, the question is based on a faulty premise. We simply do not know what Jesus' hair looked like. The paintings to which you allude tend to be those painted by the European masters in the 16th & 17th Centuries. At the time, it was fashionable for men to have longer hair, and thus it ...


6

I have not read either of the books, How Jesus Became God or Misquoting Jesus, but I have read another of his books, Forged: Writing in the Name of God – Why the Bible’s Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are (HarperCollins, 2011). In Forged, Ehman condensed a lot of challenging conclusions into a single volume, but I found nothing that many other scholars ...


6

It's pretty clear from reading the Gospels that Jesus did not have a 'fixed abode' during his ministry. He moved around from place to place. He certainly stayed on some occasions with supporters. On other occasions it is probable he slept outside. There are a number of occasions where Jesus is recorded as staying at the Mount of Olives, notably during ...


5

The normal explanation is that Jesus quoted the scriptures in Aramaic*, but as the LXX was the readily available translation of the Greek (and the Gospel writers probably had large portions of the Greek memorized), the Gospel writers would defer to its translation instead of translating directly. *Because the authors of the LXX had different resources than ...


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