Hot answers tagged

2

I mostly agree with the answer given by @AndrewShanks, summed up in his first paragraph. On the other hand, his answer does not confront the Scriptural foundation of John's logos. The logos is, essentially, God Himself, it is the Greek rendering of the equivalent Hebrew word dabar, and, even more probably, of the Aramaic memra, a term used especially in the ...


2

According to Catholicism, were all 1st century Christians called “saints” by saints Paul, Jude, John etc, as they addressed all believers reading their New Testament writings as “saints”? The short answer is yes, however he applied other terms to 1st century Christians as well. Saint Paul, the Apostle of the Gentiles employed several terms by which the ...


2

While the three words holy (or holiness), sanctified (or sanctification), and consecrated (or consecration) have similar meanings and a shared etymology, I suggest sanctified is more clearly related to the notion of being "set apart" than either holy or consecrated. I am not suggesting holy and consecrated have no connection to the concept of ...


2

There are aspects of moral and ceremonial cleanness associated with the word Kaw-doshe (Holy) and aspects of being set apart, as in something that is holy unto the Lord: Leviticus 27:30 - Every tithe of the land, whether of the seed of the land or of the fruit of the trees, is the LORD's; it is holy to the LORD. These aspects, when applied to people ...


1

Rather than a commentary you might find an Introduction to the New Testament helpful such as this one which does go into the socio-historical context. More detailed commentaries are usually on a book-by-book basis. You can get commentaries on every book of the Bible, such as the New Bible Commentary, although this will won't go into so much detail (some ...


1

Using the Blue Letter Bible to search for that term we can see it yields no results. The closest word I could find results was prōtotokos / πρωτοτοκοσ, found 40 times in LXX, 3 times in MGNT and 3 times in TR. In Col. 1:15, as seen in MGNT, that's the term used for "the firstborn" which can be read in more detail in Strong's G4416 - prōtotokos. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible