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16 votes

What is the history behind/Origin of the doxology that often gets added to the end of the Lord's prayer?

I can't find this doxology in the lords prayer as recorded in scripture It is in the King James Version: And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, ...
guest37's user avatar
  • 5,667
12 votes

How possible is it that the Septuagint / LXX wasn't specifically quoted in the NT?

It is highly unlikely. I will address the OP's commentary/questions in turn: The reason why I ask this is because I can't really seem to find much proof of the age of the Septuagint. I offer the ...
Susan's user avatar
  • 4,333
10 votes

Did the original Greek scriptures use upper and lower case letters, in particular for "Holy Ghost"?

Actually none of the above. The original Greek manuscripts were written in all capital letters. The minuscule script (which evolved into the Greek lowercase) was developed only during the 9th-10th ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 20.6k
9 votes

What is the history behind/Origin of the doxology that often gets added to the end of the Lord's prayer?

A Catholic priest, Father William Saunders, answers here: Who Added The Doxology? To summarize: The doxology is very old, going back to the first century. To quote the article: In the early ...
Paul Chernoch's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

What version of the bible do Greek speaking Christians use?

The language has certainly changed. As such, translations into modern Greek are used. Today's Greek Bible is often used, and translations by the Hellenic Bible Society have the Blessing and Approval ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 7,055
9 votes
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What is the Etymology of the Name of Jesus?

1. Question Restatement : Is there textual / literary evidence that "Jesus" is a name derived from "Zeus"? What is the Etymology of the Name, "Jesus"? 2. Answer - The Names Jesus and Zeus are not ...
elika kohen's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

What is the Protestant understanding of the Greek "anamnesis" and "poieo" in Luke 22:19?

This whole subject is dealt with, admirably and historically, by the Wikipedia article Lord's Supper in Reformed Theology and I thoroughly recommend it. The word ποιέω in Greek (see Strong 4160 and, ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 25.8k
8 votes

Is the Greek word Protoktistos used anywhere in the Bible?

I am quoting from Young's Concordance and therefore looking at the KJV :- Κτιστης Ktistes 'Creator' occurs once. ... served the creature more than the Creator [Romans 1:25] Κτιζο, ktizo - the verb ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

When did the concept of οὐσία begin to refer to God's nature?

The earliest use of οὐσία to mean the substance or essence of a thing is by Aristotle in his Κατηγορίαι, though Aristotle attributes its earlier use to Plato. Justin Martyr comments on Aristotle's ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 8,151
6 votes

When did the pronunciation of "Jesus" change?

The reason why Jesus is pronounced with the J sound we have in English today is because the letter I as a consonant in early Old French shifted to the J pronunciation we have in English today through ...
Mark's user avatar
  • 61
6 votes
Accepted

Recommendations for Ancient Greek NT "versions"

The Nestle-Aland/UBS text is standard. This is an edited text which shows what the editors think the original text was most likely to be based on the evidence they have researched. The NA and UBS ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 20.6k
6 votes

Is Ignatius' claim that Christians didn't keep the Sabbath correctly translated?

For the early Church, the Lord's Day, or Kyriake, as it came to be known in Greek (and Dominicus, being exactly equivalent, in Latin), was the first day of the week, or Sunday. Justin Martyr, First ...
Sola Gratia's user avatar
  • 8,380
5 votes

Why did Jesus use a Greek proverb when He spoke Aramaic to Saul in Acts 26:14?

That Saul had some familiarity with Greek literature is shown by a number of passages, for example: For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For ...
Hold To The Rod's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What is the earliest indication of controversy regarding the anarthrous θεός in John 1:1?

The earliest mention of controversy appears to be in the writings of Origen of Alexandria, in the third century. He indicates that some debate already existed on the matter in his time, and he ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
5 votes

Recommendations for Ancient Greek NT "versions"

The Englishman's Greek New Testament, available widely, has the Stephens Text of 1550 and an interlinear, literal, English translation. It is one of a few almost identical Greek texts which are ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 25.8k
5 votes
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What did the original Christian writings look like during the 1st century CE?

The earliest Biblical manuscripts were almost certainly written on papyrus. We know of over 130 Biblical papyri dating from the second to the eighth century. These were written in majuscule case, and ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Is there any ancient or modern connection between the word "sin" and the sport of archery?

Idioms are notoriously difficult to translate, since they are specific to the language of origin and may cause confusion when translated literally. One example is the expression “to miss the mark” (...
Lesley's user avatar
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5 votes
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What was the reason why the Jews specifically used the substitute Adonay/Kyrios for the Tetragrammaton?

Here is an answer from a Jewish perspective. The Bible calls G-d Y-h-v-h, which is called “the Tetragrammaton,” which means a four-letter word. While the Tetragrammaton appears on Torah scrolls, even ...
Turk Hill's user avatar
  • 346
5 votes

What is the Protestant understanding of the Greek "anamnesis" and "poieo" in Luke 22:19?

The phrase in Luke 22:19, “do this in remembrance of me” is subject to different interpretations. I will provide a Lutheran answer. Literally in Luke 22:19, it is “do this into (Greek eis) my ...
Jess's user avatar
  • 3,637
4 votes

What version of the bible do Greek speaking Christians use?

The majority of Greek-speaking Christians (Greece, Turkey, Cyprus and the diaspora) belong to the Orthodox Church. While some sectarians (i.e. non-Orthodox) may use some other text, to my knowledge ...
guest37's user avatar
  • 5,667
4 votes
Accepted

What prompted the second century writers to adopt the concept of οὐσία to refer to God's nature?

This seems to have been prompted by Greek Philosophy beginning about 600 BC. This is most pronounced in the teachings of Plato, specifically his Theory of Forms in Plato's cave allegory. Details In ...
James Shewey's user avatar
  • 2,626
4 votes

Does a literal reading of Romans 4:25 conflict with Reformed theology?

Horatius Bonar (1872) explains the ambiguity in the verse and gives the Reformed explanation: The manifold blessings flowing from resurrection and ascension are not to be over-looked; but nowhere ...
user5197's user avatar
  • 837
4 votes
Accepted

How do Jehovah’s Witnesses explain the unique wording of Colossians 1:15-17 in the NWT?

Summary of Jehovah's Witness Teaching: Jehovah God is the Creator (Revelation 4:11). He is without beginning or end, and he is almighty (Psalm 90:2). Jesus, on the other hand, had a beginning (...
Lesley's user avatar
  • 32.4k
4 votes

In the 325 Nicene Creed, what is the meaning of "of" in the phrase, "He is of another substance or essence?"

That phrase was written both as a condemnation of individuals within the Church, and religious groups that maintained that Jesus Christ was "of another substance or essence". As you rightly ...
Anne's user avatar
  • 32k
4 votes
Accepted

2 Thessalonians 2:4 - What is the biblical basis for thinking the Antichrist/Man of Lawlessness will set himself up in a rebuilt temple in Jerusalem?

As I understand the Dispensationalist view, they see the plans for a Third Temple in Ezekiel 40 that has not yet been fulfilled. So they expect it to be built in the future. However, the third and ...
Ruminator's user avatar
  • 1,954
4 votes

Do Christians use ancient Greek polytheistic connotations when defining the literal meaning of Hell?

The basic answer is provided in the OP. "In the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, the word Hades is used for Sheol." This version, the Septuagint, was the translation used by nearly all ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
4 votes

Why do Christians use "Lord" and "God" instead of "Yehueh" and "Elohim"?

And how hear we every man in our own tongue, wherein we were born? Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judaea, and Cappadocia, in Pontus, and Asia, Phrygia, and ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 25.8k
4 votes

What is the meaning of the "mark" in the original text of the Book of Revelation?

It is chapter 13 of Revelation, verses 16 & 17, that form the question, which makes it a hermeneutic question, not a Christianity one. That aside, it is a Greek word used in the text - charagma. ...
Anne's user avatar
  • 32k
3 votes

Did Jesus ever directly say he would die as a voluntary sacrifice? If so, was it double sense?

Yes, Jesus did say that he would die, voluntarily as a sacrifice: 14 I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, 15 just as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down ...
Jon the Architect's user avatar

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