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St. Thomas Aquinas, in his commentary on Matthew 5:19, gives a few different interpretations of the Fathers: […] the least commandments, according to Chrysostom, are Christ’s commandments; hence, Whoever shall break one of these least commandments which I am about to say. And the argumentation can be connected as follows. Since the Law cannot be broken, ...


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There is surely a hierarchy of commandments. It begins with our duty toward God and goes on to speak of our duty to our fellow man; by definition, that is in an order of greater importance to less, inasmuch as God is more important, quite simply, than man. Moreover, keeping the latter are worthless unless the former are kept as a basis - not committing ...


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I really like enegue's answer. I would only add that the distinction being drawn by Jesus 11 Truly, I say to you, among those born of women there has arisen no one greater than John the Baptist. Yet the one who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. 12 From the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven has suffered violence,[...


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In the introduction to his letter to the Romans, Paul says this: 3Concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord, which was made of the seed of David according to the flesh; -- Romans 1:3 (KJV) The Greek here is: τοῦ the one γενομένου upon being made ἐκ from σπέρματος of the seed Δαυὶδ of David Also, in his letter to the church at Galatia, Paul says this: ...


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While the text does not say, I believe their motivation was, “If he says ‘from God,’ we can prosecute, and if he says anything else, we can veto it because we’re the leaders.” Jesus stuck them with the dilemma they thought they would stick Him with.


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The question was effective, because it highlighted the hypocrisy of the religious Jews in question. According to the Bible, John was sent from God, and they knew it. Their concern was how answering this question would affect their agenda. if we say, ‘From men,’ we are afraid of the multitude; for all hold that John was a prophet Denying John's God-...


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What made Jesus question at Mt 21:25 so effective or was it a bad question because the Jews could not answer? Answer: The question was effective, considering: The context of the question (Matt 21 - 23), which is part of the narrative purpose of Matthew, i.e. Jesus's confrontation with the Religious Authorities of Jerusalem to expose their stubbornness and ...


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Jesus saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That the publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom of God before you. For John came unto you in the way of righteousness, and ye believed him not: but the publicans and the harlots believed him: and ye, when ye had seen it, repented not afterward, that ye might believe him. [Matthew 21 :31,32 KJV] There was ...


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Be Ye Not Called Masters Here is Jesus' teaching in context: Matthew 23:1-12 (DRB) Then Jesus spoke to the multitudes and to his disciples, 2 Saying: The scribes and the Pharisees have sitten on the chair of Moses. 3 All things therefore whatsoever they shall say to you, observe and do: but according to their works do ye not; for they say, and do not. 4 ...


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Father - Matthew uses strong number 3962 in greek for father while Paul uses strong number 1080. I'm not sure how this distinction was understood 2,000 years ago however it appears that there is one. Without knowing the historical distinction we can conclude from the context of both passages that A. Matthew is using the term 'father' in the context of ...


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The context is of a special appointment - the eleven only. Then the eleven disciples went away into Galilee, into a mountain where Jesus had appointed them. [Matthew 28:16 KJV] There were hundreds of other disciples to whom he did not speak these particular words, the hundreds of brethren who saw him alive from the dead. After that, he was seen of ...


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John 8:31 Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed;


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Your question is really two questions, the first is theological, the second is whether "all" and "many" are semantically synonymous enough to be interchangeable. The second question is addressed first, because, properly understood, the Scriptures themselves will answer the first question. The adjectives, "many and "all" are not grammatically synonymous in ...


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"For many" in Matthew 26:28, which priests say during the consecration of the wine at Holy Mass, means that although Christ's sacrifice redeemed all men, not all, due to their sin, would profit from it. Dom Guéranger, O.S.B., comments on the words of the consecration of the wine, in Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of Holy Mass: pro multis ["for ...


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