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There is no information on the quality of Jesus' singing The Catena Aurea includes commentaries on this verse from Origen, Bede, Rabanus, Chrysostom, Hilary, and Jerome and not one of them talk about the quality of Jesus' singing. No other commentaries I found talked about Jesus quality of singing either, nor made reference to any extrabiblical traditions. ...


5

This question was asked and answered in an older Watchtower magazine. The take away is that those apostles who lived to see Jesus coming in his kingdom were the apostles Peter,James and John who witnessed the transfiguration. About a week after saying what he did at Matthew 16:28, Jesus took “some of” the apostles (Peter, James and John) up on a lofty ...


4

My study bible (The NIV Study Bible by Zondervan) notes that it was a common ancient practice to "telescope" a genealogy -- i.e. to skip over generations when building the list. In the introduction to 1 Chronicles (where you'll also find a number of "missing" generations in its numerous genealogies), it states: The most common type of fluidity in ...


4

It is desirable in any important matter to have strong testimony to a fact. As a Protestant, my primary source is always the scripture and it is scripture itself which advises that one should have strong testimony in all important matters viz : At the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter be established. [...


4

The section "Of the Institution of the Apostolic Primacy in blessed Peter" of the First Vatican Council's Dogmatic Constitution on the Church of Christ (Pastor Æternus) quotes Matthew 16:18 and related verses: We therefore teach and declare that, according to the testimony of the Gospel, the primacy of jurisdiction over the universal Church of God was ...


4

This is not addressed in the Preface to the 1984 NIV, so we must look elsewhere for clues. The best explanation I've found comes from Craig S. Keener's commentary on Matthew: Some take sinners here to mean the 'am hā'āres common people whom the Pharisees despised for their lack of adherence to Pharisaic food laws (as in Jeremias 1972:132; thus the ...


3

Various creeds and confessions can be utilized in answering a question like this one. A general view has been that Jesus is denouncing or correcting actions that were abusing oaths and the inherent trust meant to be attached to them. We should also take note of James's teaching in James 5:12 (ESV): But above all, my brothers, do not swear, either by ...


3

James Ussher, in his Annals of the World (first published in 1658), writes: “Phlegon stated that in the 19th year of Tiberius (as Eustathius Antiochus noted in Hexaemeron) and the fourth year of the 202nd Olympiad (that is 33 AD), the following events took place... 'There was a large and most famous eclipse that had ever occurred. The day was so ...


3

While acknowledging the most salient point in Thunderforge's answer that there is no (specific) information on the quality of Jesus' singing, an inference can be made based on scripture that is exactly opposite to that which he has drawn from Isaiah 53:2. Such an inference (of, in my opinion, greater or at least equal strength) can be drawn from Mark 7:37 ...


3

In this passage the Greek uses an Aramaic term of contempt (requ). Devaluation of people is a sin that can be manifested in various ways – here it is an expression of anger used against another person. These verses are about the hypocrisy of the religious teachers of the Law and the Pharisees. In verse 21, Jesus highlights the fact that although the Law ...


3

What does Jesus mean regarding “Raca,” and “you fool?” - is he contrasting them? According to the Aramaic language reka means empty one. Matthew 5:22 Matthew 5:22 is the twenty-second verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament and is part of the Sermon on the Mount. It is the first of what have traditionally been known ...


3

I looked at other translations than the KJV, and I found where the clauses are separated by "and" instead of "but." This indicates that Jesus is somewhat repeating himself for emphasis, and perhaps even saying that they are nearly as bad as each other. The NIV says: But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to ...


3

Your main question (What do Jehovah's Witnesses say about Matthew 16:28?) has been answered but this has nothing to do with October 1914 when the Witnesses say Jesus began to rule, invisibly, from heaven. The disciples who were present when Jesus was transfigured were “anointed” Christians, part of the 144,000 class with a heavenly hope, those who reign ...


3

And he went and lived in a city called Nazareth, so that what was spoken by the prophets might be fulfilled, that he would be called a Nazarene. (Matthew 2:23) [ESV] In his book, Barney Kasdan states Matthew is using a midrash, which is "an interpretive act, seeking the answers to religious questions (both practical and theological) by plumbing the meaning ...


3

For the sake of brevity, I have placed a single page regarding the parables of the kingdom here on google docs. A number of the parables of the kingdom, as described in the page, convey that what is 'likened' to the kingdom is not actually the kingdom. The parable itself reveals that the essence of the kingdom resides within something that is 'like' the ...


3

What the parable teaches Jesus's parables are not comprehensive systematic theology lectures. They teach particular things through analogies but without telling the whole story. What this parable teaches us is: That our sin is like a zillion dollar debt that we owe to God. It is so immense we can hardly put a number to it, and there is no possible payment ...


2

Justification through grace alone and faith alone doesn't mean that one can act in an evil or negligent manner and still be saved. One can lose one's salvation through failing to act in accordance with Christ's teachings. True faith always results in a person wanting to act in a beneficial manner towards others and to do them good. If a person's faith doesn'...


2

Wikipedia's Four Marks of the Church ... one, holy, catholic and apostolic ... links to One true church which purports to outline the Roman Catholic doctrine -- 7 paragraphs with 15 footnotes which I won't copy-and-paste here. That does mention "Peter" four times, including, The Church recognizes that in many ways she is linked with those who, being ...


2

By "Other ancient authorities add verse 21, But this kind does not come out except by prayer and fasting" they mean that not all sources contain verse 21, and they come to the conclusion that it is a later addition and not originally there. So the translators omit the verse to be closer to the original text (which is unknown). It reflects a decision what ...


2

The parable isn't really about once saved always saved, rather it is about the idea of paying lip service to God's forgiveness through Jesus Christ. Grace is a free gift, but what did the servant say? “At this [threat of prison] the servant fell on his knees before him. ‘Be patient with me,’ he begged, ‘and I will pay back everything.’ Mat 18:25 NIV ...


1

The NRSV-CE (1989) comes from the RSV-CE (1966), which is a 1946 Protestant translation with all canonical books included (pp. xviii & 9 of Which Bible Should You Read?). The NRSV-CE omits "fasting" in its translation of Mk. 9:29 (so does the NABRE): He said to them, “This kind can only come out through prayer.” cf. Rheims's Mk. 9:28: And he said ...


1

St. Thomas Aquinas's commentary on Matthew 27:46 explains that He calls Him His Father, in that He is God; He calls Him His God, in that He is man: wherefore, when He says, My God, My God, etc., it is clear that He is speaking insofar as He is a man; hence, He groans, to express the greatness of His human suffering.


1

Let's look at the narrow context: Adultery 27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 If your right eye causes you to stumble, gouge it out and throw it away. It is better for you to lose one part of ...


1

He certainly knew how. Mt. 26:30 (Mk. 14:26): And a hymn being said, they went out unto mount Olivet. St. Thomas Aquinas writes (intro. to his exposition on David's psalms): A hymn is the praise of God with song; a song is the exultation of the mind dwelling on eternal things, bursting forth in the voice. Christ praised His Father perfectly; ...


1

One of the comments mentioned that "heart" can mean "center or midst of a thing". I thought to pick up on this for this verse. For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale's belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. Mat 12:40 καρδία kardía, kar-dee'-ah; prolonged from a primary κάρ kár (Latin ...


1

Jehovah's Witnesses are one such group of Christians that makes the assumption that being in "the heart of the earth" refers to being in a burial tomb or grave. One basis for this assumption is that Jesus elsewhere confirms that he would be/was killed and then raised up from the dead on the third day. From that time forward, Jesus began explaining to his ...


1

I'm with JDM-GBG and yourself: the genealogy here is telescoped, i.e. generations have been omitted, and this is common practice in the Scriptures. Rather than repeat the work of Dr John Millam I will just refer you to his online article "The Genesis Genealogies - are they complete?" which looks at many genealogies in Scripture. An especially interesting ...


1

OP: "Given this background, how do Protestants explain the fact that the Lord entrusted an abundance of his goods, which I'm going to assert is grace (and I don't think Protestants dispute this, but correct me if I'm wrong; cf. Eph 4:7-8; Mt 25:14-15), to his "servant" (not someone 'unsaved'),1 and depending on how he makes good with what is entrusted to him,...


1

I may be looking at this parable completely wrong but as a Christian, I believe OSAS (once saved always saved). We do not work or do good deeds for our salvation and once we have been "born again or regenerated" our standing as a child of Gods is secure. Justification does not come from our works or what we do for God but once we have been justified we are ...


1

There was an interesting sermon on this in the Presbyterian (Protestant) church I go to. Of course, given that Protestant ministers are not told what to preach by any 'superior' body (only that it ought to confirm Protestant orthodoxy), you might find a different Protestant minister with a different 'take' on this matter. Given that nobody's salvation ...


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