5

According to this source The tradition of using the Bible in oath-taking likely comes from ninth-century England, where, without dedicated governmental centers, the altar of a church often served as the courtroom for oaths and contracts. Gospels began to be used in the contractual ceremonies, and, eventually, the tradition migrated into English courtrooms ...


3

The instruction not to swear an oath using God's name, throne, altar, etc. from the text is an injunction against invoking Him in order to add more gravity or credibility to what is being said. It comes in the context of Jesus taking many of the commandments of God (no murder, no adultery,...) and stripping away outward obedience to reveal that conformity at ...


2

The detail of the order in which the 'tests' (as you refer to them) are arranged is just one part of the evidence regarding the purpose of each book. Each of the four gospel accounts is quite clearly covering the period of Jesus' presence on earth according to a certain aspect of Jesus Christ's Person. That aspect is the purpose of the book - to convey a ...


1

The key to understanding the passage is in the words: "Let your yes be yes, and your no, no." "Swear not at all," isn't a abolishment of all forms of oaths or swearing, but rather a command for Christians to be honest, and to create a society in which 'I swear!' should not be necessary. Say the truth; say what you mean.


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