23

There was no mandate that the gospels should appear in the order they were written once they were gathered into a collection. This is true of the rest of the New Testament as well. The order is the gospel accounts, the history of the early church, the letters of Paul to churches, to people, letters by other apostles, and prophecy. So, there ...


18

It's because the early church fathers thought that Matthew was written first. This is known as the Augustinian Hypothesis, and its namesake, Augustine, writes: Now, those four evangelists whose names have gained the most remarkable circulation over the whole world [...] are believed to have written in the order which follows: first Matthew, then Mark, ...


17

This potential discrepancy is addressed in Apologetics Press' question: Did Both Thieves Revile Christ? Possible resolutions to the discrepancies between the accounts: Possibility #1: Initially, both thieves reviled Christ, but then one of them repented. After hearing Jesus’ words on the cross, and seeing His forgiving attitude, the one thief may ...


12

What lies below is certainly not the only way to interpret this scripture, but it is one way I find extremely compelling, and to my knowledge, provides a reasonable historical understanding. This passage in scripture is built on a long foundation of culture and history, which is largely lost on a modern audience. First, a reminder about the immediately ...


9

The New Testament was written in Greek, but the Greek text records Jesus' words in Aramaic (in Mark, Hebrew in Matthew). The Gospel writers transliterated the Aramaic (Mk 15) and Hebrew (Mt 27) into the Greek script. It is important here to distinguish between script and language. For instance, I can write in Spanish, Latin, German, English, etc. all with (...


9

Short answer, no. Not at all. It would count as plausible deniability to the straw-man definition of "the inspired and infallible word of God", but only to the false straw-man understanding. The problem is that, almost no denomination believes that inspiration and infallibility are attributed to modern versions/translations of Scripture. Inspiration ...


9

The Veil: Its meaning Most scholars are in agreement on the ultimate conclusion and meaning of the tearing of the curtain. Perhaps none are so succinct as Ezra Palmer Gould in A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to St. Mark stating: The rending of the vail would signify therefore the removal of the separation between God and the ...


9

At the Council of Trent, the Church officially declared as dogma the canon of Holy Scripture. This included "the four Gospels, according to Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John." The council did not explicitly say whether the Longer Ending of the Gospel is canonical. However, it does declare that if any one receive not, as sacred and canonical, the said ...


8

These two different accounts in Luke 23:39 on one side and Mark 15:32 and Mathew 27:44 on other side can be reconciled. by supposing that, at first, both of them reviled the Saviour, and that it is of this fact that Matthew and Mark speaks. Afterwards one of them relented, and became penitent-- perhaps from witnessing the patient sufferings of Christ. It is ...


8

Purple in the Roman Empire was associated with triumph, and came to be associated with the Emperors specifically. Along with the crown of thorns, the purple robe was a mocking symbol of Jesus' royalty.


7

As you rightly say, the sisters are not named in the Bible which means we have to look to other sources for this information. I think it's fair to say that overall we don't know for certain, but different churches have developed different teachings and traditions on this subject. The Roman Catholic Church teach that the word "sisters" is used purely ...


7

This was apparently Jesus way of teaching us that our rewards are commensurate with our faith: All Scriptures are from the King James translation. In verse 24 the man could see but only partially, that was probably because he had heard of Jesus healing power, but was still skeptical. In verse 25 he had experienced Jesus healing power, and then expected that ...


7

The First Epistle to the Corinthians opens with an expanded address (1 Corinthians 1:1-7), identifying its writer as the apostle Paul who, with Sosthenes, was writing to the church community in Corinth. After a warm opening address, Paul urges the Corinthians to agree in what they say, and to be united in the same mind and in the same purpose. The reason for ...


7

This is an artifact of the translation you are using. There is no verb in the Greek text of the verse. Consider this version: the son of Methuselah, the son of Enoch, the son of Jared, the son of Mahalalel, the son of Cainan, the son of Enosh, the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God. [Luke 3:37-38 NKJV] Notice that the NKJV (like many other ...


7

The teaching on this passage from such as Martin Luther (see link below) is that the rich young ruler approaches Jesus as 'good Master'. The young man sees only a master who can instruct him with legal commandments. All he thinks he needs is the knowledge of good and evil. He thinks he has resource within himself to do all that is necessary - he just needs ...


6

It's Syriac. Matthew Henry's commentary in the sidebar at this link says Christ’s prayer was bantered by them that stood by (Mark 15:35, 36); because he cried, Eli, Eli, or (as Mark has it, according to the Syriac dialect) Eloi, Eloi, they said, He calls for Elias, though they knew very well what he said, and what it signified, My God, My God. Thus did ...


6

No. The word translated 'nations' is ἔθνος (ethnos), from which we derive the word 'ethnic'. It is talking about ethnic communities, which we might call people groups today, not political states. The Joshua Project estimates that there are 16,825 people groups in the word. Of those, 7,287 are unreached, by which they mean "less than 2% Evangelical ...


6

Demons can say pretty much whatever they want, lying or telling the truth as it suits them. Jesus had already been accused of consorting with demons by such groups as the Sanhedrin (for example, in Matthew 12:24). He refuted those claims, of course, but they kept coming up, so it's likely that at least some people believed them. In that context, a demon ...


5

I'm not sure I'd limit the application "abomination of desolation" to a single event/place/thing. Many scholars believe that the references in the book of Daniel (Dan. 9:27; 11:31; 12:11) refer to the time of Antiochus IV Ephiphanes who made an unclean sacrifice in the Jewish temple (among other terrible things) in the 2nd century BC. However, in the New ...


5

I assume you're refering to Mark 12:25 where it says: When the dead rise, they will neither marry nor be given in marriage; they will be like the angels in heaven. (NIV) First a couple of notes on context. This was the answer to a trick question from a group of Sadducees. The Sadducees were an elitist liberal group similar to the Pharisees, who were an ...


5

TL;DR: Milk before meat. Deep doctrine is dangerous to an unprepared soul. "I have fed you with milk, and not with meat: for hitherto ye were not able to bear it, neither yet now are ye able." (see 1 Corinthians 3:1-3) Christ taught in parables [as did Isaiah] so that the spiritually immature and spiritually mature could both benefit from the message....


5

The conundrum is summarized by William Lane: Because the text stresses that Jesus' coming to the disciples was the direct result of his perceiving their distress, the explanation that "he meant to pass by them" seems enigmatic, if not alien to the context.1 There have been three major approaches taken by commentators: Jesus' stated "intention to pass ...


5

Denial of miracles is one characteristic of the heresy of Modernism. Doctors of the Church did not deny the miraculous nature of the multiplication of the loaves: The multiplication of the loaves was not effected by way of creation, but by an addition of extraneous matter:The multiplication of the loaves was not effected by way of creation, but by an ...


5

In John 6:29, "Jesus answered them, 'This is the work of God, that you believe in him whom he has sent.'" Jesus did not do His healing works merely for the sake of healing. He came to restore faith in God as an expression of repentance. His ongoing message was, "Repent, for the Kingdom of God is at hand" (Mark 1:15). He wasn't sent as a humanitarian to fix ...


4

It's more likely Matthew and Levi were different disciples than the same. A number of the disciples had other names like we do today, however, the Gospels refer to James the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18) as a different disciple from Matthew (Mark 3:18). The Bible also mentions a disciple : "Levi the son of Alphaeus" (Mark 2:14). It's more likely this James and ...


4

I do not know who else has said this, but one prominent commentator who is of this opinion is the Venerable Bede (672-735), in his commentary on Mark.1 He does not offer historical reasons for why the blind man might have been naked, but presents his nudity in the context of the doctrine of being "born again" in Christ. As you say, this involves casting off ...


4

You get the sense of literal fulfillment by reading the verses before and after. Jesus is not switching back and forth between the two in the chapter when He talks about what will happen in the last days. When Jesus told His disciples that the temple will be torn down (13:1-2), the disciples wanted to know when that would happen, and what the sign will be ...


4

I don't see Matthew as referring exclusively to the next life. Why do you think that is what it is saying? In fact, Matthew doesn't give a time frame, therefore, it is less exact, but not contradicting Mark. They are both saying the same thing. Even in other translations, I see it as reading into the text of Matthew to say that it is referring exclusively ...


4

Many of the church fathers saw a correspondence between the Gospels and the four living creatures in Revelation 4:5-11. They disagreed over which living creature went with which gospel. However, if the correspondence was this: Lion = Matthew Ox = Mark Man = Luke Eagle = John then the gospels are ordered according to the order of the four living creatures ...


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