16

If we accept the bible teaching that Mary/Joseph had children, then they would have been younger than Jesus. In the question, the age of Jesus was 12. The oldest sibling was probably no older than 10 at that time. Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? ...


11

If you accept its own testimony then Luke was written:- Before the Acts of the Apostles and by the same author as the writer of Acts (compare Acts 1:1 with Luke 1:1-4); The author of Acts was, at times, a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys: about 49 AD, Acts 16:10-18; about 54-57 AD, Acts 20:4-21:19; and about 59-62 AD, Acts 27:1-28:30. All ...


6

Proponents of the Q theory would say that none of the alternatives provide an adequate explanation of all of the parallel passages in the synoptics. Leaving to the side any of the non-Markan-Priority theories (as they are even more minority views than Q-less views), you're left with basically two options without Q: Matthew used Luke, or Luke used Matthew. ...


5

Why the Gospel of Luke belongs in the Bible Regardless of the dating, the Gospel of Luke belongs to the Bible because it contains authoritative teaching of Jesus to guide Christians as well as authoritative reports of who Jesus is (how he was incarnated into a baby, how his divinity was affirmed from heaven in baptism and transfiguration) and what he did (...


4

The difference between Protestants and Catholics here all starts with the Catholic view that Mary died a virgin. But some scriptures talk of Jesus's brothers, such as Matthew 12:47 and Mark 6:3. So some Catholics say that brothers here means cousins. Protestants reply that there is a specific Greek word for cousins which would have been more appropriate ...


3

Luke 2:43-44--and as they were returning, after spending the full number of days, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem. But His parents were unaware of it, but supposed Him to be in the caravan, and went a day's journey; and they began looking for Him among their relatives and acquaintances. As DJClayworth mentioned in his comment above, it may well ...


3

I would argue that you are missing the significant point of the story. See the next verse of the text you mentioned in John 21 And He said to them, “Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast, and now they were not able to draw it in because of the multitude of fish. 7 Therefore that disciple whom Jesus ...


3

Zechariah had a number of precedents which would have been an example to him. Firstly, Abraham had been visited by three 'men' and the narrative is written in a mysterious way, indicating the nature of that 'visitation' : And he lift up his eyes and looked, and, lo, three men stood by him: and when he saw them, he ran to meet them from the tent door, and ...


2

Our Lord Jesus used the phrase “Truly I say to you” (Synoptic Gospels) and “Truly, truly, I say to you” (John’s Gospel) many times. One aid to deciding if in Luke 23:43 he said “Truly, I say to you today,” with the comma after “today” or “truly I say to you, today” with the comma before “today”, is to see how he uses this phrase everywhere else. Read ...


2

I don't disagree with the answer from L1R, but I would like to add another viewpoint. In the first event, as recounted in Luke, Jesus asked him to put out a little way from the shore In other words the boat was close to the shore, in shallow water (and obviously unsuitable for fishing). Jesus asks them to take the boat away from the shore, where the ...


2

μενοῦνγε menoun menounge broken down reveals mén, "indeed"; oún, "therefore"; and gé, "really") – therefore really indeed. Indeed in this case doesn't stand alone as an affirmation. It is truly contrary. In modern vernacular one might say, "Actually, on the contrary..." No matter how one wants to look at it, Jesus is correcting the woman's focus and saying, ...


2

It was common at that time for several families to travel together, this was a necessity; since there were many highwaymen. And the smaller children were probably left in the care of a trusted member of the family; or a trusted friend. Since it was normal for all families in that era to watch over all children. This would have been quite normal. As a child ...


2

My Parish Priest, who incidentally belongs to a coastal area, has this explanation: An average fishing boat of Jesus'time measured 27 by 7.5 feet , about four feet deep and was large enough to hold about 15 people (Courtesy: TheCompass). The crew would comprise of the rowers and the net-bearers. Most rowers occupied the right side of the boat so as to be ...


2

The robbers represent the demons, the fallen angels, who take advantage of man fallen into sin: From the Catena Aurea on Luke 10: AMBROSE: But who are those robbers but the Angels of night and darkness, among whom he had not fallen, unless by deviating from the divine command he had placed himself in their way. and AUGUSTINE: He fell then among ...


2

Why would Zachariah doubt Angel Gabriel? Surely the Scriptures give us the reasons. Zechariah asked the angel, "How can I be sure of this? I am an old man and my wife is well along in years." - Luke 1:18 Would not any of us doubt what was said in such circumstances. Seeing an Angel when one is an old man in itself would make most of us question ...


2

There does not seem to be one view. It is taken either as having a “temporal” significance or an “eschatological” one by Amillenials. The Non-Millenarian View [1] This takes us to the third point, and that is the meaning of the phrase “until the full number of the Gentiles has come in” (v. 25). Most commentators agree that Paul’s use of “until”...


2

There was some controversy over the phrase in the 80's because some minority of manuscripts appeared to omit the phrase which led to some Bible versions removing it or footnoting it. However, earlier manuscripts were found in the 50's that did have the phrase in it which make the later omissions likely scribal errors (mistakes). It has since been restored ...


1

I appears that Paul quoted from the book of Luke which would date Luke prior to Paul's death. 64-67 Ad 1 Tim. 5:18 For the Scripture says, “You shall not muzzle the ox while he is threshing,” and “The laborer is worthy of his wages.” 19 Do not receive an accusation against an elder except on the basis of two or three witnesses. And Luke 10:5 Whatever ...


1

She calls herself a "handmaid" (ancilla, δούλη) in Luke 1:38 and in her Magnificat canticle (Luke 1:48) because she is very humble. Fr. Cornelius à Lapide, S.J., commentates Luke 1:38: Mark the humility, modesty, and resignation of the Virgin, for though saluted by the angel as Mother of God, she calls herself His handmaid, not His mother; handmaid by ...


1

In John Calvin's view, Jesus is saying that before the current generation died out, great suffering and tribulation would come upon the church, which should therefore take warning and prepare, but also trust that it is part of God's plan, hence not to despair. He is therefore also saying that Jesus was not indicating by this that he would soon return. ...


1

All Christians are still waiting for the Second Coming of Christ, where Jesus would come in glory as a King and a Judge in contrast with the "First Coming" about 2000 years ago, where He came in humility (baby in a manger) as God Incarnate (fully human being born of a woman) and as the Lamb of God / Suffering Servant (sacrifice for our sin as He was ...


1

Matthew's Gospel is first for the Jews and Luke's Gospel is for the Gentile. The focus of Matthew is that Jesus is "the King of the Jews", the Messiah promised to Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, who would be a direct-line descendant of King David, etc. The original purpose of Matthew's Gospel was for the Jews, and Papias tells us that Matthew's Gospel was first ...


1

Pulpit Commentary Your BibleHub link missed the Pulpit Commentary which treats verse 32 together with verse 31. While the Pulpit Commentary editor is Anglican, I think the answer is applicable to the Reformed tradition as well. After relating a possible historical background of the war simile (which Jesus may have used) and relating a modern version with ...


1

According to Catholicism, why did the robbers strip the traveler to Jericho? First of all, it must be stated that this story as recount by Our Lord is indeed a parable. The parable of the Good Samaritan is a parable told by Jesus in the Gospel of Luke. It is about a traveller who is stripped of clothing, beaten, and left half dead alongside the road. ...


1

I think it's just to give emphasis of the story. First, it certainly wasn't an impossible thing to happen. The road from Jerusalem to Jericho is a long and desolated one. Surely robbers had plenty of time to do what they wanted, and since clothe was valuable, why not steal it? Moreover, there are several too familiar references in the New Testament about ...


1

St. Thomas Aquinas explains why He says "right side" (and not "left side") in his commentary on John 21, lecture 1: Secondly, the Evangelist mentions Christ's order, Cast the net on the right side of the boat. In Luke (5:4) there is a similar incident, but there Christ did not tell them to cast their nets to the right side, as he does here. The reason ...


1

Luke sought eyewitness testimony for his gospel. The birth narrative and some other portions seem to be told from the viewpoint of Mary the mother of Jesus. While it is somewhat speculative, it seems reasonable that Mary would be concerned about relationships within her own extended family much more than the majority of the early Christians. It would appear ...


1

A Calvinist would not fail to use the same care at exegesis as any other serious Christian. If you look at 1 Kings 19, where God tells Elijah to annoint Elisha as his successor, what is Elisha's answer to Elijah? 19 So Elijah went from there and found Elisha son of Shaphat. He was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen, and he himself was driving the ...


1

From the Calvinist perspective, there is an emphasis on the "Perseverance of the Saints" the idea that if you are genuinely born again. A.K.A saved by God's sovereign Grace. God will not "fail" in his attempt to save you. He will carry out the act of bringing you through this earthly life, having maintained faith in Christ throughout the whole time. This ...


1

Many of the answers here in this parallel question appeal (as OP seems to do) to the idea that Mary's question to Gabriel, "How can this be, since I know not a man?' only makes sense if she was already committed to remaining perpetually virgin. After all, the argument goes, she knew she was engaged, she knew consummation was coming, and she must have known ...


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