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If you accept its own testimony then Luke was written:- Before the Acts of the Apostles and by the same author as the writer of Acts (compare Acts 1:1 with Luke 1:1-4); The author of Acts was, at times, a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys: about 49 AD, Acts 16:10-18; about 54-57 AD, Acts 20:4-21:19; and about 59-62 AD, Acts 27:1-28:30. All ...


6

There are three occasions in scripture when I can think of someone not receiving an 'answer' to prayer. But on all three occasions, they did receive a response from God the Father. The person asked, but did not receive what they asked for. But they received a response. Firstly, the one you mention : Jesus prayed that the cup should pass from him yet only if ...


6

Proponents of the Q theory would say that none of the alternatives provide an adequate explanation of all of the parallel passages in the synoptics. Leaving to the side any of the non-Markan-Priority theories (as they are even more minority views than Q-less views), you're left with basically two options without Q: Matthew used Luke, or Luke used Matthew. ...


5

Why the Gospel of Luke belongs in the Bible Regardless of the dating, the Gospel of Luke belongs to the Bible because it contains authoritative teaching of Jesus to guide Christians as well as authoritative reports of who Jesus is (how he was incarnated into a baby, how his divinity was affirmed from heaven in baptism and transfiguration) and what he did (...


4

The gospel of Jesus, written by Luke, has a specific reason for giving the genealogy that he does. Notice where Luke suddenly (almost unexpectedly) places that genealogy. He plonks it right inbetween Jesus' baptism in the Jordan river and the temptations in the wilderness (Luke 3:23-38). Why would a genealogy appear there, in the narrative? Well, consider ...


3

Luke was a Gentile, possibly from a Roman family, and a close companion of the Apostle Paul. He is thought to have been a physician. Luke also wrote the book of Acts. The gospel of Luke was written between A.D. 58 and A.D. 60 and his target audience were Gentiles. Luke probably wrote his account in Rome, although Achaia, Ephesus and Caesarea have also ...


3

Zechariah had a number of precedents which would have been an example to him. Firstly, Abraham had been visited by three 'men' and the narrative is written in a mysterious way, indicating the nature of that 'visitation' : And he lift up his eyes and looked, and, lo, three men stood by him: and when he saw them, he ran to meet them from the tent door, and ...


3

Luke 2:43-44--and as they were returning, after spending the full number of days, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem. But His parents were unaware of it, but supposed Him to be in the caravan, and went a day's journey; and they began looking for Him among their relatives and acquaintances. As DJClayworth mentioned in his comment above, it may well ...


2

The second passage you quote is repeated in Luke 11:1-11, with some additional detail. Firstly, Jesus teaches us the Lord's Prayer. It focuses on a) God's will being done, b) God providing our basic physical needs, c) God providing our spiritual needs. Jesus then tells a parable similar to the persistent widow, about a friend who received everything he ...


2

Different genealogy in St. Matthew and St. Luke? The reason for the differences between these two genealogies are multiple. St. Matthew's genealogy is that of St. Joseph St. Luke's, that of the Blessed Virgin. The genealogy of Christ according to the First Evangelist descends from Abraham through three series of fourteen members each; the first fourteen ...


2

Good question. I think you are in great company, because David, for example, said, "Why, O Lord, do you stand so far away?" in Psalm 10:1. I think it provides a level of perspective when we understand that it doesn't say, "Ask and it will be given to you immediately". Hebrews 11:13 teaches us that some people died while still enduring, ...


2

μενοῦνγε menoun menounge broken down reveals mén, "indeed"; oún, "therefore"; and gé, "really") – therefore really indeed. Indeed in this case doesn't stand alone as an affirmation. It is truly contrary. In modern vernacular one might say, "Actually, on the contrary..." No matter how one wants to look at it, Jesus is correcting the woman's focus and saying, ...


2

There was some controversy over the phrase in the 80's because some minority of manuscripts appeared to omit the phrase which led to some Bible versions removing it or footnoting it. However, earlier manuscripts were found in the 50's that did have the phrase in it which make the later omissions likely scribal errors (mistakes). It has since been restored ...


2

Why would Zachariah doubt Angel Gabriel? Surely the Scriptures give us the reasons. Zechariah asked the angel, "How can I be sure of this? I am an old man and my wife is well along in years." - Luke 1:18 Would not any of us doubt what was said in such circumstances. Seeing an Angel when one is an old man in itself would make most of us question ...


1

Pulpit Commentary Your BibleHub link missed the Pulpit Commentary which treats verse 32 together with verse 31. While the Pulpit Commentary editor is Anglican, I think the answer is applicable to the Reformed tradition as well. After relating a possible historical background of the war simile (which Jesus may have used) and relating a modern version with ...


1

I appears that Paul quoted from the book of Luke which would date Luke prior to Paul's death. 64-67 Ad 1 Tim. 5:18 For the Scripture says, “You shall not muzzle the ox while he is threshing,” and “The laborer is worthy of his wages.” 19 Do not receive an accusation against an elder except on the basis of two or three witnesses. And Luke 10:5 Whatever ...


1

She calls herself a "handmaid" (ancilla, δούλη) in Luke 1:38 and in her Magnificat canticle (Luke 1:48) because she is very humble. Fr. Cornelius à Lapide, S.J., commentates Luke 1:38: Mark the humility, modesty, and resignation of the Virgin, for though saluted by the angel as Mother of God, she calls herself His handmaid, not His mother; ...


1

In John Calvin's view, Jesus is saying that before the current generation died out, great suffering and tribulation would come upon the church, which should therefore take warning and prepare, but also trust that it is part of God's plan, hence not to despair. He is therefore also saying that Jesus was not indicating by this that he would soon return. ...


1

All Christians are still waiting for the Second Coming of Christ, where Jesus would come in glory as a King and a Judge in contrast with the "First Coming" about 2000 years ago, where He came in humility (baby in a manger) as God Incarnate (fully human being born of a woman) and as the Lamb of God / Suffering Servant (sacrifice for our sin as He was ...


1

Many of the answers here in this parallel question appeal (as OP seems to do) to the idea that Mary's question to Gabriel, "How can this be, since I know not a man?' only makes sense if she was already committed to remaining perpetually virgin. After all, the argument goes, she knew she was engaged, she knew consummation was coming, and she must have known ...


1

We normally think of "parable" as referring to a fictional analogical story. But the Greek word παραβολή has a broader meaning than this. BDAG gives this definition: someth. that serves as a model or example pointing beyond itself for later realization, type, figure a narrative or saying of varying length, designed to illustrate a truth especially ...


1

Even if "Matthew" is a semitic name, it doesn't negate the possibility of name changing. The name changing from a semitic name to another one is not unusual. We recognize the name changing of Abram to Abraham and Simon to Cepha. Why not Levi to Matthew (Mattija? = Gift of Yahweh)? Moreover, the fact that the name Levi was mentioned only once in the ...


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