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1

Before we can accurately and thoroughly answer this question, we have to first look at two huge issues that are the entire source of the confusion. This quote is from one of the "answers" and is the classic example of these two myths recycled over and over but it doesn't fit with scripture or history. [Notice the two phrases starred in the quote] ...


2

The reason for committing Mary to the Apostle John, rather than to James the brother of Jesus is because James was not a believer. John was. John was at the cross, James was not. Now the Jews' feast of tabernacles was at hand. His brethren therefore said unto him, Depart hence [from Galilee], and go into Judaea, that thy disciples also may see the works ...


2

Jesus’ Mother and Brothers 46 While Jesus was still talking to the crowd, his mother and brothers stood outside, wanting to speak to him. 47 Someone told him, “Your mother and brothers are standing outside, wanting to speak to you.” 48 He replied to him, “Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?” 49 Pointing to his disciples, he said, “Here are my mother ...


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Why did Jesus commit Mary into the care of the beloved disciple, not James, who is known as his brother? This question seems to be more involved in interpretations concerning the the Sacred Texts of the Gospels rather than the opinions various denominations. Almost all Christians are in accord that at the moment of Christ’s death, Joseph the husband of Mary ...


1

The assumption that John wrote clearly about the deity of Christ, but the other three gospels don't, doesn't really hold up under similarities shown below. We know some have questioned John because of the Passover day/date differences, but not for this reason. Nonetheless, is the assumption accurate? Matthew Matthew opens with Christ's genealogy. 23 verses ...


4

I would suggest that the question, as stated, hinges very much on the one word 'seems'. To whom does it 'seem' ? And is that apprehension correct ? Mark, for example, begins his gospel account by referencing Malachi in such a way that Mark is asserting that John the Baptist is the 'messenger of preparation' and that Jesus is, according to Malachi 3:1-3 'the ...


1

The gospel of John was written at a time when the belief that Christ was God who became human (incarnation) was already common/universal in the church as evident in the earliest New Testament record found in Paul's epistles (cf. Philippians 2:6-7, 1 Cor 8:6, 10:4 Gal. 1:1, 1:12, 4:4). Paul wrote his epistles with high divine Christology circa 40-50 whilst ...


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If we accept that John wrote his gospel about 30 years after the other three, that is, near the end of the first century, then it would appear that the Gospel of John was written to counter the rise of the two great heresies that have plagued the church throughout its history, namely: Gnosticism - Jesus was not really human but only appeared to be human - ...


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"I am not asking for a comparison between John’s gospel and the others"; nevertheless, a brief comparison is necessary: Tax collector Matthew's Gospel is very organized (e.g. written in 5 sections). Its intended audience is Jews (expectations of the biblical messiah), and Jesus is presented as a Ruler, to lead them. Servant by tradition Mark's ...


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As Rhetorician has said, it is the greater work of bringing souls to salvation. Just before Christ died, after His ministry of, debatably, three and a half years, there were about one hundred and twenty believers (Acts 1:15) in Jerusalem, and some elsewhere (eg at Sychar in Samaria). When Peter preached at Pentecost, on the first day of receiving the Holy ...


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All the feasts point to Christ, and we know 100% that Christ celebrated the feasts. Likewise, Paul celebrated the feasts, even after the resurrection - and he said that the Feasts are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ. Here follows three reasons we know that Christ celebrated the feasts: Because He created them, and God instructed ...


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