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My answer is based on one minor quibble: Sinlessness is not impossible. At each point where we have sinned, the choice to not sin was available and was possible. It may have involved a cost we were unwilling to pay, or missing an opportunity we wished to take, or (as is often the case) that an earlier choice was required to avoid the sin, but it was never ...


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Reformed Christians believe that fruit ("good works") are an inevitable consequence of faith. One consequence of faith is salvation. The other, fruit. There is no such thing as a "believer" that does not bear fruit. The statement is redundant, as stated by Jesus in verse 5 of the same passage: he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit The ...


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The whole vine analogy loses a lot when separated by centuries of non-agricultural life. This is not primarily a scientific description of salvation but a spiritual description of the kingdom of heaven. A vine has branches that bud and bear not just leaves but fruit also and it has other branches that bear leaves only. These are colloquially called '...


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There are understood to be two different ways of being "in the vine," and only one is a reference to true salvation. The illustration in question clearly describes (in addition to branches which are fully a living part of the tree) branches which are outwardly, visibly attached to the tree, but which do not inwardly share in the life of the tree. They're ...


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Your question is really two questions, the first is theological, the second is whether "all" and "many" are semantically synonymous enough to be interchangeable. The second question is addressed first, because, properly understood, the Scriptures themselves will answer the first question. The adjectives, "many and "all" are not grammatically synonymous in ...


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"For many" in Matthew 26:28, which priests say during the consecration of the wine at Holy Mass, means that although Christ's sacrifice redeemed all men, not all, due to their sin, would profit from it. Dom Guéranger, O.S.B., comments on the words of the consecration of the wine, in Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of Holy Mass: pro multis ["for ...


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Just the idea of remaining should clarify that a person can be once there on the vine but be pruned off, because they themselves rejected what they formerly had and didn't produce fruit. Matthew 7:22-23 seems to say clearly that even people who call Jesus Lord Lord, and who cast out demons in his name and do miracles in his name are not recognized as ...


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