37

Commentators give a number of explanations for the silence of the Synoptists on the raising of Lazarus: To protect Lazarus from persecution Differing source material Distinct criteria for what to include The Synoptics narrate other miracles, and saw no need to include this one as well The geographical and narrative focus of the Synoptics differs from that ...


24

The internal evidence of the authorship is found in four passages in the Book of Revelation. It is in these four passages that the author refers to himself as "John". Rev 1:1 This is the revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants the things that must happen soon. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John, Rev 1:...


24

The theological problem is to explain why Jesus apparently trusted Judas, when he ought to have known better. There are a lot of possible answers! Some have tried to find symbolic or exemplary meaning in his actions - a lesson for the future Church. Others have centered the discussion around the character of Jesus, perhaps reaching similar conclusions for ...


22

From a Christian perspective, there is no role for Mohammed in the Bible. "The comforter" is believed to be the Holy Spirit. From Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible and he shall give you another Comforter. This is no inconsiderable proof of a trinity of persons in the Godhead; here is the Father prayed unto, the Son in human nature praying, and ...


18

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. (John 1:1, NIV) All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness. (2 Timothy 3:16, NIV) The Greek word for 'Word' in John 1:1 is Logos(λόγος) and 'Scripture' in 2 Timothy 3:16 is Graphey(γραφή). Though 'Word' ...


16

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses the question of "Whether Christ's body ought to have risen with its scars?" in Summa Theologica III q. 54 a. 4. He gives five reasons (c.): It was fitting for Christ's soul at His Resurrection to resume the body with its scars. for Christ's own glory. For Bede says on Lk. 24:40 that He kept His scars not from inability ...


15

It wasn't just convenient: according to John (verse 4) Jesus "had to" (dei') pass through Samaria. It was not geographically necessary, as He could have (like most Jews did unless they were in a hurry) gone around Samaria. When John uses dei' he is referring to God's will. Jesus passed through Samaria with the intention of speaking with this woman. Jesus ...


15

I would not be so sure to exclude any reference to Muhammad from the Bible. In fact there is a fairly mainstream historical view of Revelation that directly includes him as the leader of a Saracen invasion that invaded Christianity like a 'locust plague' in the seventh century. A review of the symbol and the history arguably describes the prophecy in an ...


15

When you look at Jesus' command in light of the whole law, and other instances where He said similar things (such as "be ye as perfect as your father in heaven"), you realize that while this is a command, it's really just a repetition of all the previous commands given by God over thousands of years. Jesus' command is just a reaffirmation of what God has ...


15

Many commentators have enjoyed pointing out the Pharisees' mistake, which is just one of several errors they make in this chapter. A "pure" sarcasm would mean that the Pharisees considered Galilee to be the place where prophets came from - a bit like associating Washington, DC with politicians. But the context is their rejection of Jesus (known to them as a ...


14

The word describing the garment Peter put on is ἐπενδύτης, which is a hapax legomenon in the New Testament and rarely used in ancient Greek literature. Etymologically the word derives from a verb that means "to put on over". It is a garment (perhaps specific to the profession of fishing) worn over something else. So it might be better to think of Peter ...


14

Good question, it is written "Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men." (Philippians 2:5-7) Herein it says Jesus is equal with God (the Father), thus ...


13

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


12

The body of Christ ascended with him into heaven, as was witnessed by his disciples and many others. Luke 24 (ESV): 50 Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and lifting up his hands he blessed them. 51 While he blessed them, he parted from them and was carried up into heaven. 52 And they worshiped him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy, 53 and ...


12

Here are a few commentaries on this verse from Christian Bible scholars. To a large extent, they agree with your suspicion that the men were reacting to Messiah's use of the words "I AM," and the authority with which he spoke them. Parenthetical notes are the original authors'. From Elliot's commentary for English Readers: They went backward, and fell to ...


12

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


11

It means it took that long to build. This is apparent from the fact that they were challenging Christ's claim that He would build it in three days, when it's taken 46 years of work thus far. From Barnes' Notes on the Bible Forty and six years ... - The temple in which they then were was that which was commonly called "the second temple," built after ...


11

Leo the Great wrote for the Council of Chalcedon in 451, It does not belong to the same nature to say, "I and the Father are one," and to say, "The Father is greater than I." For although there is in the Lord Jesus Christ a single person who is of God and of man, the insults shared by both have their source in one thing, and the glory that is shared in ...


10

We do not know what Jesus wrote. There is no other part of the Bible that makes a reference back to this passage to tell us what He wrote, or why He wrote it. However, at least some of the more-scholarly sources simply point to Jeremiah 17:13: O Lord, the hope of Israel, all who forsake thee shall be put to shame; those who turn away from thee ...


10

We do not know exactly where heaven or hell is. However, in Scripture, the word "up" is commonly used in association with the location of heaven and "down" is typically associated with the location of hell, either figuratively or literally. Also, from the vantage point of heaven, earth is down. The "up" and "down" ...


10

I think taken together the Gospels do make us think about this possibility. God has inspired not just the texts of each Biblical book in isolation, but in relation to each other. Lazarus himself is interesting, being mentioned only in John, despite his resurrection being one of the most stunning of all of Jesus's miracles. But to go so far as to assert that ...


10

The earliest Christians' knowledge of Lazarus came not from the Gospel accounts, but rather from personal acquaintance or acquaintance with those who knew Lazarus. In short, they knew Lazarus personally and knew he was not the person in Luke's account. That knowledge was passed down through the ages in the Church. In the Eastern Orthodox tradition, ...


9

I am aware of one protestant view that has not been brought up, so here it is for your consideration: To interpret John 6:53 we examine the context, close to the beginning of the conversation, at John 6:35. "He that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst." In this verse Jesus sets up the interpretation for the "...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ*, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


9

That is exactly not the point he is trying to make. He is trying to say that it's our actions that show whether God or Satan is "our father" in a very figurative sense. He is saying "You are not the righteous just because you descend of Abraham, if you not also behave like that". Reversing that to say Jews are "children of Satan" in general is basically the ...


9

For information on how the Greek grammar supports the New World Translation, there are some related answers over on Biblical Hermeneutics to the question: In John 1:1c, should the Greek word θεὸς be translated into English as “a god” or “God”? Answer 1 by user2924 Answer 2 by elika kohen In addition to an Appendix article of the New World Translation of ...


9

TLDR; In this passage, Jesus uses language claiming God as a personal father; a begetting father, rather than in an abstract, "God is the Father of Humanity" sort of way. From here, the Jews performed simple deductive logic; the son of God is a god, therefore Jesus is claiming to be a god. More specifically, Jesus was claiming to be as divine as God, and ...


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