Hot answers tagged

31

The Nephilim are a subject of much debate. There are a number of views on what they were, the two prominent views being the Sethite view and the Angelic view. Both are an opinion on who or what the "sons of God" are. The Nephelim are most notably mentioned in Genesis and seem to be a driving decision to send the Flood of Noah. The Nephilim were on the ...


29

Genesis 2:24–25 (ESV): Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and they shall become one flesh. 25 And the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed. Genesis pretty clearly views them as husband and wife, even giving their union as foundational to all other marriages.


27

As science suggests, the physical universe of time, space, and matter is not eternal. It had a beginning. Thus it was created. It was not arranged or mixed or reassembled, but created out of nothing. Genesis 1 repeatedly uses the phrase, "God said, 'Let there be...', and there was...". God spoke, and what previously did not exist began to exist. So, ...


23

Mormons believe both passages, That Adam and Eve were commanded to multiply (Genesis 1:28). Unless these partook of the fruit of the tree of knowledge Adam and Eve could not have children (2 Nephi 2:23). Also, God commanded them not to partake of the tree of knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 2:17). So really, the contradiction in Mormon belief seems to ...


22

Traditionally, many liberal theologians (e.g. Walter Bruggeman) have separated Genesis into two parts - Genesis 1 - 11 and Genesis 12 - 50. The dividing point begins with Abraham, and the tone of Genesis does change significantly at that point. In the first 11 chapters, Adam through Noah and Babel represent nearly 2000 years of human history. A broad ...


22

The answer to the question regarding the first book of the Bible actually comes from the last book of the Bible: And the great dragon was thrown down, the serpent of old who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him. Revelation 12:9 NASB And he laid hold of the ...


20

According to http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2001/SyedQadri.shtml, the total volume of the world's oceans is 1.3 to 1.5 billion cubic kilometers, which comes out to 310 to 360 million cubic miles. The surface area of the Earth is about 200 million square miles. So if the Earth was a perfect sphere, with no mountains, no valleys, no ocean trenches, the water ...


20

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...


19

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word apple has, until recently, always meant simply "fruit" in English. This was certainly the case at the time of the earliest English Bible translations in the 1600s. In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (e.g. Old English ...


18

When Adam and Eve sinned in the garden, God gave them skins to cover up with (Genesis 3:21). To get those skins, some animal had to die. In other words, God sacrificed an animal to cover their sin1. From the beginning, God has declared the payment for sin is death, and so blood must be shed to cover sin: Leviticus 17:11: “For the life of a creature is in ...


17

Names were considered to be meaningful in some way. For example, the younger of Isaac's twin sons with Rebekah was named Jacob ("supplanter") because when he was born he was holding on to Esau's heel, as if attempting to overtake him. (Genesis 25: 24-26) After Jacob's wrestle with the angel, when he demanded a blessing from the Lord, the angel pronounced ...


15

There are several issues you bring up that need to be addressed in this question, and it is going to take a little space. Only Israel? You are correct in your assumption that God loves the whole world and not just Israel. However, Israel was, indeed, specifically chosen as part of God's plan to proclaim His name throughout the world. Here is a general ...


14

No textual reason for interpreting Genesis figuratively Whenever we ask why we should take something in the Bible as literal, we must start by asking ask why we should not take it as literal. Does the text give us any reason to interpret it as being figurative? In the book of Revelation, and other places where mortal man is given a glimpse of eternity, ...


14

There is no denomination or teaching that I'm aware of that approves of this. Your question shows a lack of understanding of the basic nature of that the Bible is. It is not a collection of stories, showing heroes in a positive light. It is a collection of books including teachings, but also, largely in the Old Testament in the Pentateuch and the Books of ...


14

It wasn't just convenient: according to John (verse 4) Jesus "had to" (dei') pass through Samaria. It was not geographically necessary, as He could have (like most Jews did unless they were in a hurry) gone around Samaria. When John uses dei' he is referring to God's will. Jesus passed through Samaria with the intention of speaking with this woman. Jesus ...


14

There are definitely two types of angels mentioned in the Bible that have wings - cherubim and seraphim: “The cherubim shall spread out their wings above, overshadowing the mercy seat with their wings, their faces one to another; toward the mercy seat shall the faces of the cherubim be” (Exodus 25:20). “And the sound of the wings of the cherubim was heard ...


13

One interpretation is that Cain's offering was not selective but Abel's offering was of the best ("fat portions") of the special ("firstlings"). Under this interpretation, Abel considered God well worthy of special honor (which tends to be associated with love), while Cain may have viewed the sacrifice more as something to be done, an expected action that ...


13

The verses you quote give one very obvious reason: to fill the earth, take control of it, and rule it. This might be slightly more understandable by analogy to adopted children of a good king. The king desires his children to not just like him in title (accomplished simply by the adoption) but like him in character and action (rightly using authority ...


13

No. These are two different trees. The LORD God made all kinds of trees grow out of the ground--trees that were pleasing to the eye and good for food. In the middle of the garden were the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. (Gen 2:9) At first, only one was made off limits to humans. but you must not eat from the tree of the ...


13

Neither Roman Catholics nor just about any other Christian denominations believes that the Bible contains every detail possible. As John writes, These things are written that you might know that Jesus is the Christ. Just about every accepted theory of inspiration suggests that the Bible that the words we have are "sufficient" (and that is the Theological(...


12

God destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah because of their grievous sins along with other towns in the plain of the Jordan, except Zoar. Genesis 18:20-21 (NIV) Then the Lord said, “The outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah is so great and their sin so grievous that I will go down and see if what they have done is as bad as the outcry that has reached me. If not, I ...


12

I believe that you are referring to the theory that the original sin was sex. This, however, is not Biblically true. Before the fall, God said: And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every ...


12

There are many covenants which are recorded in the Bible. Some are made by people, some are made by God, and some are made between God and people. The terms Old Testament (Covenant) and New Testament (Covenant) are general terms which are referring to two specific covenants. The Old Testament is a term which refers to the Mosaic Covenant which was between ...


12

The first verse that comes to my mind is in Genesis 18:12- Therefore Sarah laughed within herself, saying, After I am waxed old shall I have pleasure, my lord being old also? This is the only verse I can really remember in this context, and it is probably what Peter is referring to.


12

In support of the idea that it did not rain is the very next verse: Genesis 2:6 But a mist went up from the earth and watered the whole face of the ground. No further mention is made of rain until the Flood account. Anything beyond this is conjecture on our part.


12

Two fourth-century fathers clearly make this connection. First, Cyril of Jerusalem: The multitude of the hearers was confounded;—it was a second confusion, in the room of that first evil one at Babylon. For in that confusion of tongues there was division of purpose, because their thought was at enmity with God; but here minds were restored and united, ...


12

The word Dragon occurs 13 times in the Bible but only in the highly symbolic book of Revelation. From the Ancient Greek drakôn (δράκων), meaning "giant serpent", depicting a terrifying monster, a serpentlike devourer. This is an appropriate portrayal of Satan due to him using a snake to deceive Eve in the Garden of Eden. In European tradition the dragon is ...


11

Jesus refers to this episode in Luke 17. Here are verses 28-33 in the NIV: "It was the same in the days of Lot. People were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building. But the day Lot left Sodom, fire and sulfur rained down from heaven and destroyed them all. It will be just like this on the day the Son of Man is revealed. On that day ...


11

This can only be answered from a literalist Young-Earth Creationist (YEC) perspective, because to all other perspectives it's a moot point, so I'll answer from that viewpoint. I might as well throw in my usual disclaimer that I'm not debating whether the YEC view is true, this is just explaining the YEC view. Such debates in comments are off-topic and ...


11

This is a great question. The Bible never provides a direct rationale for the seemingly long ages recorded in the Old Testament. It just states them as a matter of fact with no apology for them. As we look more closely at the ages, though, we find some very interesting things. The ages fall quite dramatically at a very definite point in biblical history ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible