17

St Thomas Aquinas asks in Summa Theologica 3.1.3, "If man had not sinned, would God nevertheless have become incarnate?" (Latin: Si homo non peccasset, nihilominus Deus incarnatum fuisset?). His answer is "no", while acknowledging that God could have still chosen to become incarnate for other reasons; although he recognizes a diversity of thought on the ...


14

The point of the illustration is to reconcile God's sovereignty in salvation with man's free will to choose salvation. I believe it originated from H.A. Ironside: It has been pictured in this way. Here is a vast host of people hurrying down the broad road with their minds fixed upon their sins, and one stands calling attention to yonder door, the ...


11

Does God intend or call some people to live alone forever in their life? The short answer is that it is very possible. There are four basic states of life within the Catholic Church: marriage, consecrated life, priesthood and the single state as an unmarried lay person. Trying to find one’s true vocation in life is for some individuals a task that will ...


10

In short, no. Pilate had a choice. In Jesus' conversation with him, He says this: Jesus answered, “You would have no power over me if it were not given to you from above. Therefore the one who handed me over to you is guilty of a greater sin.” John 19:11 ESV The Jewish religious leaders--not all Jews--were guilty of a greater sin than Pilate, even ...


10

Although the Bible does contain a certain amount of direct, doctrinal teaching, much of its teaching comes in the form of stories. In the Old Testament, there are the various narratives of people and nations and their actions, both good and bad. In the New Testament, there is the story of the life of Jesus and of the people who surround him, who do things ...


9

With all due respect to Mark Hausam, the logic just doesn't hold water. That sounds like a category error. Category Errors These fallacies occur because the author mistakenly assumes that the whole is nothing more than the sum of its parts. However, things joined together may have different properties as a whole than any of them do separately....


9

I'm not sure if the Church has an explicit doctrinal position on this question, but I can give you the view of classical philosophy, as originally expounded by Aristotle and then developed chiefly by St. Thomas Aquinas. This view undergirds the thinking of most orthodox Catholic theologians, historically speaking. In this way of thinking -- assuming you ...


9

That is a great question, and sometimes I have pondered that myself. Through study of the scriptures and church resources I have come to this conclusion: What is Agency? Basically, agency is the ability and privilege God gives us to choose and to act for ourselves. Agency is essential to God's Plan of Salvation. Without it, we could not make the choices ...


9

I'll try to answer from a Catholic perspective, so, for example, I'll take for granted that we actually do have free will. Now why is free will a good thing, even though it makes sin possible? The reason is that it also makes it possible for us to love God and to freely obey Him. The intention is not that we permanently remain undecided between sin and ...


8

I hope that I can help here. A couple months ago I got engaged. I prayed a lot about the decision and felt like it was a good move in my life. One that would be hard but would be worth it. Well, 2 weeks ago my fiancee broke up with me. That was one of the hardest days of my life. And it would of been so easy to say, "I prayed; it felt like a good choice, I ...


8

Genesis 3 answers this question pretty definitively: Then the Lord God said, “Behold, the man has become like one of Us, knowing good and evil; and now, he might stretch out his hand, and take also from the tree of life, and eat, and live forever” Genesis 3:22 NASB Adam and Eve were not created with the knowledge of good and evil. They were innocent--...


8

Short Answer: No, John 6:44 does not imply that there is no free will when it comes to salvation. What the text itself implies (theology aside) is that a person can only come to Jesus if the Father draws him. It says nothing about whether free will plays a part in salvation, or (if so) how it does. (In fact, it doesn't even really say anything about ...


8

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


8

The statement of "choosing to go to hell" is an over-simplification that really is an example of intellectual laziness, and is a great example of the difference between the "true theology" of a group and the type of pop-theology that springs up and causes great confusion. Looking at it from any side, saying that people choose to go to hell does not make ...


7

Of course Pilate is not portrayed as a Christian, or even a good man, let alone a saint. However, nearly all bible commentators agree that Pilate was trying to avoid crucifying Christ. Undoubtedly it was political pressure from the Jewish leaders that forced his hand against his own will. First Pilate really did not care about the silly religious ...


7

Just because it was already prophesied, does not mean that Judas did not make a conscious choice. A man can most definitely choose to be used by Satan or by the Holy Spirit. Judas, by his actions, was already choosing, as he was choosing to steal from the purse.(John 12:6) This showed that even though he was with Jesus, the Holy Spirit was not working within ...


6

The Christian position is this: The Old Testament is just as much God's Word as the New Testament is. There are differing Christian positions on how much we should consider the Old Testament to be history. The majority position would be that most of it is considered roughly historical. A substantial number would consider it all to be 100% historical, and a ...


6

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


6

Following the commandment "Going therefore, teach ye all nations" (cf. Matthew 28:19 Douay-Rheims-Challoner Version), part of the mission of the Church generally is to educate—not only in religion, but in other areas—and in service of this mission many universities around the world are specifically recognized as Catholic universities. Canon law ...


6

I don’t currently personally affirm libertarian free will, though I used to. It’s been a subject of great interest to me so I’ve researched it at length. If a strong case can be made from the Bible, I think it would have to start with the following passages. Descriptive passages that sound like libertarian free will It’s hard to deny these passages sound ...


6

I see that this question has already accepted an answer, but the comments suggest that some concerns still remain, so I'll attempt to provide an answer that fills in these gaps. I would think that most Christians agree that we should love our neighbor as ourselves. The disagreement concerns what is considered to be loving. This would to come down to a ...


6

Do all Christians believe in predestination? No. Do all Christians believe in free-will? No. Does the Bible teach predestination? Yes Does the Bible teach Free-Will? Yes Romans informs us that salvation is about God's choice. Romans 10 informs of of man's responsibility to believe or man's choice. Is Jesus God? Yes. Is Jesus Man? Yes. ...


5

I would not call it punishment but rather, the RESULT or OUTCOME of freewill. Let's give an example. You tell your little son not to touch the hot iron on the table. But, out of curiosity, the boy touched it anyway and the little hands burned. The child exercised his own freewill even if a strict warning was given by you. This is a result of ...


5

I think this question can be answered without becoming lost in all the differing views of what is ‘exactly’ free will and what is ‘exactly’ predestination. From a high level the church is basically divided on this subject between the thinking of St Augustine (or what protestants think he believed) versus Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, or Assyrian church views. ...


5

The word "Freewill" doesn't exist in the Bible but the concept does exist. The Bible doesn't spell out the term "Freewill" clearly and hence doesn't provide any clear definition of what freewill is. The Freewill theology has a long history, at least 2000 years ago, discussed by philosophers. Many Christian theologians have studied this and made many ...


5

The quote is from C.S.Lewis in "Mere christianity", book 4, chapter 3 "Time And Beyond Time".


5

The term "hyper-Calvinist" is a moving target, due to its pejorative nature, but several historical theologians are widely considered to fall under that label. I'll examine the views of two of them before moving to the position held by "traditional" Calvinists/reformed theologians. Both groups see God working to change the will of the sinner, making him ...


5

The simple answer is that God has decided that the wages of sin is death. It is entirely up to God as to what punishment sin deserves, and the punishment God chose was eternal damnation. The Heidelberg Catechism's first section on Sin and Misery speaks about this, in particular question and answer 10: Q. Does God permit such disobedience and rebellion ...


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