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Yes, a letter from Pope Gregory I to the Abbot Melitus was recorded by the venerable Bede in Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, Book I, chapter XXX. In his letter of instruction regarding the conversion of England, Gregory said: To his most beloved son, the Abbot Mellitus; Gregory, the servant of the servants of God. We have been much ...


6

Why does the Catholic Church not celebrate the Feast of Naming of Jesus? Who says we do not? Those who follow the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, celebrate it under the title of the Feast of the Circumcision of Our Lord, on January 1st, the Octave Day of Christmas. Moreover it also celebrates the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus. According to the 1962 ...


5

The Wikipedia article you link to actually gives a clear explanation: quoting from the Roman Calendar, "so that it would harmonize better with the Gospel story." From 1389, when the feast was first made universal in the Western Church, until 1969 when the most recent edit was made to the Roman Calendar, the feast was held on July 2. This is exactly 1 week (...


5

The Visitation commemorates the event described in Luke 1:35-56, in which Mary goes in haste to her relative Elizabeth: 39 In those days Mary arose and went with haste into the hill country, to a town in Judah, 40 and she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. 41 And when Elizabeth heard the greeting of Mary, the baby leaped in her womb. ...


4

Easter and Passover are two different celebrations. Passover celebrates the escape of the Israelites from Egypt and the sparing of them from the plague of killing the firstborn. Easter celebrates the much more significant resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. You will find these events described in all four of the Gospels in the New Testament, Matthew ...


3

Why is the Nativity called “Christmas”? There is no clear cut source as to why the word "Christmas" became such a popular term at this time of the year than that of the "Nativity". However there are a few hints as to why this came about. Let us take a look at the etymology of the word "Christmas" first. “Christmas” is an Old English word, constructed ...


3

Your hunch "that it is the Feast of the Assumption" appears correct, at least according to Rev. W. J. Wiseman, “The Titular Feast,” The Pastor 3, no. 5 (March 1885): 129–36. In the § "Practical Directions" (p. 131), he writes: Blessed Virgin is a general title. […](a) If the titulus is simply B. M. V., the titular feast is to be celebrated on the ...


3

It is not the practice of the Catholic Church to have doctrines or precepts about particular Jewish Holy Days or celebrations. If the Church did, it would be easily found in the Catholic Encyclopedia. Here is what the Catholic Encyclopedia actually has to say about Yom Kippur. The rites to be observed on the Day of Atonement are fully set forth in the ...


3

Both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches have many traditions and customs surrounding the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, body and soul into heaven. The domestic church, that is to say the family, like the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph practices its Christian faith in such ways as to continuously deepen their belief in their holy ...


2

There seem to be no records of the specific theological basis on which March for Jesus was founded. However based on its priorities and aims it is easy enough to discern general theological principles for the event. The founders (like many Christians) are coming from a theological traditional where it is not necessary to find specific biblical approval for ...


2

One of the great controversies that led to the Schism of 1054 was the type of bread to be used at Passover. For the Roman Catholic, it was unleavened. For the Eastern Orthodox, it was leavened. The symbolism was a contrast of death or life. As explained here, the Orthodox view meant to observe the resurrection in newness of life, rather than in the ...


1

What is the norm for celebrating First Friday/Saturday Novena Masses on Holy Days of Obligation? These devotions you speak of are not technically novenas and as such the Mass of the day fulfills the need to complete the requirements of these same devotions. First of all, we must understand what are the First Friday Devotions, the First Saturday Devotions ...


1

Were islands/countries discovered by Hispanic explorers named after Mozarabic feast days? The short answer is no. But that no has to be clarified. It could be yes or no, according to which Rite the person who named the said lands belonged to. Both Rites were in use in Spain at the time of the Spanish colonization of the Americas. The name "Mozarabic ...


1

"Make it clear from scripture based on the bible, where did a prophet or Jesus or his disciples/apostles tell us how to keep this feast we call Easter IN THE BIBLE?" TL;DR: That's not possible. The Bible doesn't promote Easter, it condemns it. Passover, and the following Days of Unleavened Bread, is a biblical festival celebrating the ancient Israelites' ...


1

Why does the Eastern Orthodox Church call the 49 days following Easter, Pentecost and the Western Church does not? To put it in a nutshell: It is their tradition to do so. The Eastern Orthodox Church calls this the Season of Pentecost because there are 50 (Pente) days between Easter and Pentecost. It is that simple. The Christian holy day of Pentecost, ...


1

The time between Easter and Pentecost is called Eastertide (or Season of Easter) in most Western churches. Western churches also refer to the Season of Pentecost to mean the time after Pentecost.


1

Going from Passover to Easter Sunday is straight-forward. The Passover occurs on the 14th of Nissan. The next 7-days (the 15th through the 21st) are observed by eating Unleavened Bread. During the period of Unleavened Bread, a weekly Sabbath will occur. The day after this weekly Sabbath is the annual Feast of First Fruits: 9 And the LORD spoke to Moses, ...


1

The only Catholic Church tradition of commemorating the sacrifice of Abraham (Gen. 22:1-18) is at the Easter vigil with the second reading being the actual account of Abraham taking his son Isaac to the land of Moriah to be sacrificed to God. It is not the tradition of the Church to commemorate Old Testament events in themselves, but rather to associate ...


1

According to dictionary.com Christmas is from the Middle English "Mass of Christ" The Feast of the Nativity is the celebration of Jesus's birth. It seems like it was called Christmas because it was the day where everybody went to Mass to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ If it was "Nativimas" it would loosely translate to "Mass of the birth of Jesus ...


1

In 1969 the Feast of the Visitation was moved from July 2 to May 31. I do not desire to repeat the excellent comments in Matt Gutting's answer, so I will simply add a few points or tidbits of my own to this question. The idea of May 31 as a date for the Feast of the Visitation is an excellent way for the Church to conclude the month of May which is ...


1

Jean Christian Petitfils in his historical survey on Jesus' live states that this feast is more likely to be the Rosh ha-Shanah, the Jewish new year, which took place on 1st and 2nd of Tishiri (begining of automn 31). Unfortunatly he does not elaborate on that. Cf. Jean Christian Petitfils, Jésus, Fayard, Paris, 2011, p 219.


1

We attend the Holy Sacrifice of the Altar, i.e. we "have Mass". I recall two or three years ago the priest gave a homily about it at Mass one night; apparently it was a Tuesday night. It's not a big deal in my city, at least (which, with a population of more than 300,000, has only one Sunday sacrifice (in a church smaller than most American churches), that'...


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