23

Mormons believe both passages, That Adam and Eve were commanded to multiply (Genesis 1:28). Unless these partook of the fruit of the tree of knowledge Adam and Eve could not have children (2 Nephi 2:23). Also, God commanded them not to partake of the tree of knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 2:17). So really, the contradiction in Mormon belief seems to ...


18

When Adam and Eve sinned in the garden, God gave them skins to cover up with (Genesis 3:21). To get those skins, some animal had to die. In other words, God sacrificed an animal to cover their sin1. From the beginning, God has declared the payment for sin is death, and so blood must be shed to cover sin: Leviticus 17:11: “For the life of a creature is in ...


15

I don't have enough information to speak about the Southern Baptist Convention, where each congregation is a separate entity, and some could accept what the OP cites as the "serpent seed" doctrine, nor can I address the issues of the Assemblies of God. I do have some familiarity with the beliefs of the Methodist and Presbyterian Churches, and am a ...


13

On the surface, the teaching that 'the original sin' was Eve having sex with the serpent/Satan and that this resulted in Cain could seem to most Protestants to be bizarre, nonsensical and offensive. They may think that someone promoting such a line would be mocking the scriptures and Christianity and not be in any way serious. On further investigation, ...


13

Augustine's concept of defining all sin in terms of disordered love is certainly applicable: for Augustine, rightly ordered love was virtue (City of God 15. 22) and disordered love was vice... the depravity created by disordered love was so deep that no one could extricate or heal him or herself from it. - David K. Naugle, source He applies this concept ...


11

I believe that you are referring to the theory that the original sin was sex. This, however, is not Biblically true. Before the fall, God said: And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every ...


9

This article on the Answers In Genesis website is a good introduction: https://answersingenesis.org/death-before-sin/did-death-of-any-kind-exist-before-the-fall/ One short quote: The Bible never uses the Hebrew term nephesh chayyah (living soul/creature) when referring to invertebrates, but it does when referring to humans and fish (Genesis 1:20; 2:7). ...


9

It seems this interpretative tradition goes back millennia to the ancient Jews. BioLogos has a short article on the development of the tradition that Adam and Eve "wore" garments of light, attributing it to the Jewish squeamishness regarding the naked body, then exacerbated by Greek culture, rampant with nudity, flooding the Jewish populations at the time of ...


8

Genesis 3 answers this question pretty definitively: Then the Lord God said, “Behold, the man has become like one of Us, knowing good and evil; and now, he might stretch out his hand, and take also from the tree of life, and eat, and live forever” Genesis 3:22 NASB Adam and Eve were not created with the knowledge of good and evil. They were innocent--...


8

They became "wise" in that they now knew (the difference of) Good and Evil. The tree is explicitly called Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, so we should assume it is right that eating the fruit conferred that knowledge. This is also confirmed by them having a different view on their nakedness after eating the fruit. So, yes, that fruit did confer ...


8

Philo The first-century Jewish theologian Philo may not have been the first Jew to reject the literal historicity of the creation stories, as it is my understanding that educated Alexandrian Jews had long understood the creation accounts to be allegories. According to Jean-Louis Ska (The Book of Genesis, page 20), Philo (prior to Josephus and the Talmud) ...


8

You appear to be slightly misunderstanding Zacharias's argument. Here are his four options: No world Amoral world (no such thing as good and evil) Constrained world (no possibility of choosing evil) Free world (possibility of choosing evil) Out of these options, he says that the fourth option, the actual Creation, is the only one in which love is possible....


7

The answer to this depends very much on the concept of who God is in the first place. If God is, as evangelical Christians believe, pre-existent, self-existent, omnipotent, omniscient, infinite and eternal, then it would be impossible for there to ever be multiple gods that share all those attributes. A created being cannot become uncreated. A mortal ...


7

Reformed Protestant theology, which includes the doctrines of justification by faith alone and the perseverance of the saints (the inability to lose said justification) regard salvation to be necessary for mankind as a result of the sin of our "first parents". That is to say, Adam and Eve did not receive "salvation" nor were they "justified" before the ...


6

The best answer I've seen is that it is an animal sacrifice: Heb. 9:22: Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins. That's because it is necessary to kill animals to get their skins. The reader would be expected to make the connection with the sin offerings required ...


6

At your suggestion lets take a longer look at 2nd Corinthians chapter 11. As with most Scriptures, it is extremely difficult to extract the true meaning from a verse or a couple of verses without considering other verses not only around that verse, but in other verses in the Bible which lend explanation to the verses in question. All Scripture is taken ...


6

One prominent Reformed theologian, Louis Berkhof, has written that "[t]he problem of the origin of the evil that is in the world has always been considered as one of the profoundest problems of philosophy and theology." Other Reformed theologians share this assessment. Charles Hodge suggests that given "the feebleness of our powers" and the "limited range ...


6

So the latter day saints are saying that God planned for Adam and Eve to fall from grace and bringing sin into the world? Yes, basically. The Book of Mormon, 2 Nephi chapter 2, explains this. The whole chapter is fantastic, and quite the sermon of one of the prophets to his sons, so I recommend reading the whole thing because it's hard to pull these verses ...


5

Charles Hodge provides a simple argument in his Systematic Theology (1.5.13.B). He begins on the same ground as stated in the question: that the glory of God is the ultimate purpose for everything. This, he says, implies that God manifesting himself is the "highest conceivable, or possible good," and that it is the ultimate purpose of creation, providence, ...


5

The Fall indeed glorifies God The reformer that spent the most effort in making his thoughts fully known about this subject is Jonathan Edwards. He wrote two famous books on the topic: Dissertation on the End for Which God Created the World, popularized in modern times by John Piper's edition, God's Passion for His Glory Dissertation Concerning the Nature ...


5

A common Evangelical answer to your question would be that even though Christ's work on the cross was* to redeem mankind from the effects of the fall, there is a now-and-not-yet-ness in regard to the complete outworking of the victory won at Calvary (*ie 'was' is really 'was'/'is'/'will be') . In particular, the physical creation in general and our mortal ...


5

The answer to your question is not an easy answer; Since the original word used here was: שׂכל Pronounced śâkal For myself I do believe that choosing our current state as opposed to remaining in God’s pristine state was either wise nor desirable. Brown Driver Biggs Definition: 1) to be prudent, be circumspect, wisely understand, prosper 1a) (Qal)...


5

In order to know the answer to the question, we need first to know the difference between the pre-fall and fall of Adam. PRE-FALL Adam was created with the ability to choose life or death (Genesis 2:17). FALL Adam was unable to choose life except by the influence of God (John 6:44). Ergo, despite of the fact that God's holy influence is so convincing, ...


5

Yes. In his book, The Problem of Pain, popular Christian author C.S. Lewis discusses Adam's sin in the context of Scientific understanding of his time, which included Darwinism. He presents an understanding in which those creatures, guided by the hand of God, became man. Despite Lewis' prominence in twentieth century Christianity, this particular viewpoint ...


5

The underpinnings of this answer depend on the theology of two covenants. Adam and Eve were originally under a covenant of works. This is to say, that God made an agreement with them that, as long as they obeyed Him perfectly, they would be saved. When they broke this covenant by eating of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, they thus lost the part ...


5

I think the quotes given answer your own question as to why the fathers taught what they did. They seem to explain themselves rather clearly and their exegesis is pretty straightforward. The curse in the garden does seem quite loaded with reproductive consequences and those having to do with "desire". However, the quotes given above are also polemical in ...


5

Paul is quite specific as to how sin entered our own sphere of existence : ... by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned: [Romans 5:12, KJV.] In this particular place he attributes the entrance of sin, into our own realm, to one man. The text you quote in I Timothy enlarges on that ...


5

Let's untangle this conundrum. First, according to Genesis, Adam and Eve were in the Garden of Eden on Earth. It says that God in some form walked in the garden and talked with Adam and Eve. People disagree about where Heaven is and how to define it. One definition is that Heaven is being in the presence of God. That would mean that when God walked among ...


5

You've missed exactly what Adam and Eve missed - the tree of Life. There it was in the midst of the garden. And there it was - the Word of Life - 'the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou dost not eat of it.' It isn't food. You can't digest it. Partake of it and you will die. But another (created) spirit drew near. (For they had not taken of the ...


4

In the post that you are referring to, it is possible that when the person says "disability is the sad result of sin in the world" they are referring to the perfect vs. post-perfect world in Genesis with Adam and Eve. God created Adam and Eve in His own image ( Genesis 1:27) and after the fall death entered the world through sin (Romans 5:12); therefore, ...


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