15

The following information is from John Dickson's The Christ Files, which is available as both a book and a DVD. There are several early records which are thought by many historians to refer to Jesus. Here are three of the earliest. With only a sentence or two, sometimes the identifications aren't perfectly clear, and some of them are debated. As with ...


10

A case could be made for Clement of Rome, considered by Irenaeus (Against Heresies III.3.3) and Eusebius (Church History V.6) to be the fourth Bishop of Rome (after Peter, Linus, and [Ana]cletus). (Apparently, there is some discussion as to whether Linus and Anacletus were essentially “auxiliary bishops” and Clement was Peter’s actual successor.) In any ...


10

I would say probable forgery. First searching for the letter before a link/source was added revealed at least 3 letters, each is written differently: Letter of Pilate to Tiberius 1 - Unable to verify by finding an image of the original Greek manuscript Letter from Pontius Pilate to Tiberius Caesar - mentions Copies are in the Congressional Library in ...


10

See Josephus' Antiquities Book 1, Chapter 6. He gives a rather detailed interpretation of Genesis 10, identifying what nations he believed the Hebrew terms refer to. Japhet, the son of Noah, had seven sons: they inhabited so, that, beginning at the mountains Taurus and Amanus, they proceeded along Asia, as far as the river Tansis, and along Europe to Cadiz; ...


9

Julius Africanus was an early third century Christian historian. He says that a pagan historian named Thallus mentions the darkness that occurred during Jesus' crucifixion, and that Thallus explained it as an eclipse. However, Africanus correctly notes that an eclipse is not possible during the Jewish Passover when Jesus was crucified (see: On the ...


9

Adam had only ONE wife, Eve. The simple answer is that Genesis chapter 1 is like an overview of the events of creation. It can be seen as the introduction. Then Genesis chapter 2 goes on to provide the detail of the events of the sixth day of creation. In Chapter 1 we are told that God, after creating all the animals, created man and woman. In Chapter 2 ...


7

"I've heard from multiple sources that there isn't even the slightest of (extra-biblical) evidence of the Exodus story or even evidence for the presence of Israelites in Egypt. If this is true...." Well, it isn't actually true. Evidence 1 Manetho was an ancient historian in Egypt and he says the Exodus happened. Now he could have just been reading ...


6

Why do I need to explain the reason Jesus Christ is not mentioned or noted as God in the "Roman Creed" and the Didache? ONE is arguing from silence any time you point to specific data that is not present. In this case, Jesus is not mentioned as God in these two documents. A rational inquiry would seek to understand the data (the words) that ARE ...


6

Apologies for the slightly sarcastic tone of this answer but I suppose the opinion of a Cessationist would lean towards sarcasm. The question in my mind is basically "What do doubters think about collections of stories that people can make?" (I personally never heard of these books). The simple answer is they are stories that the average doubter ...


5

You might be interested in the Sumerian King List. These kings lived for centuries before a flood. When kingship was lowered from heaven, kingship was [first] in Eridu. [In] Eridu, A-lulim [became] king and ruled 28,800 years. Alagar ruled 36,000 years. Two kings [thus] ruled it for 64,800 years. I drop [the topic] Eridu [because] its kingship was brought ...


5

Demas is mentioned in the Acts of Paul and Thecla, an apocryphal work attested by Tertullian around AD 190. In this work, Demas is portrayed as a troublesome "follower" of Paul. Paul is portrayed as teaching the value of chastity, and Demas opposes him: [Paul] deprives young men of wives, and maidens of husbands, saying, There is for you a ...


5

According to Scriptures, the only wife that Adam had was Eve. Notwithstanding the biblical sources, that Adam had only one wife, there is a legend that Adam had a Wife named Lilith. Lilith is the most notorious demon in Jewish tradition. In some sources, she is conceived of as the original woman, created even before Eve, and she is often presented as a ...


5

Arguments from Silence This is an articulate example of employing the argument from silence. Arguments from silence always rely on an unstated premise (think about it, it's actually pretty funny). This does not mean the conclusion of an argument from silence is always false. It means the argument is not logically valid. For example: P1: They didn't say it C: ...


4

When you think about it, this question is based on circular reasoning. Is there Biblical support for basing your beliefs on those who've come before? The Bible authors "came before." So lets imagine that there's an imaginary Bible verse that says: Thou shalt base thine opinions on those whom came before. 2 Chemicals 8:15 Who wrote 2 Chemicals? ...


4

The short answer is: none known to date. A variety of speculation has arisen on the relationship between how Herod conducted himself and the impact that had on the narrations related to him in scripture. At the lowest level of detail: the Wikipedia article cites a decent range of sources and still concludes there are no contemporary sources that match one ...


4

Briefly, no. But I think you're making a number of assumptions here, which are not necessarily warranted. We have very little information about the wise men. All we hear (from Matthew) is: Magi from the east arrived in Jerusalem, saying, "Where is the newborn king of the Jews? We saw his star at its rising and have come to do him homage." They ...


4

From a historical perspective, the texts which became canonical were those which proto-orthodox Christians accepted and based their practices and traditions upon. Therefore the practices and traditions are in keeping with books which became part of the Bible. If you think about it some Christian traditions must predate the writing of certain texts. In 1 ...


4

To answer all five of your questions. Yes, there is more information. There are English translations. You can find a rendering of the text in English at newadvent.org. that appears to date to 18961. There is another English rendering here with a helpful introduction. If not a correlation, there is some similarity. A twenty-two page analysis of text, ...


4

What is the earliest explicit mention of infant baptism? It seems that St. Irenaeus (202 AD) is the earliest to reference to the practice of infant baptism. In 185 AD, he wrote the following: Irenaeus, c. A.D. 185: He came to save all through means of Himself—all … who through Him are born again* to God—infants, and children, and boys, and youths, and old ...


4

It is desirable in any important matter to have strong testimony to a fact. As a Protestant, my primary source is always the scripture and it is scripture itself which advises that one should have strong testimony in all important matters viz : At the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter be established. [Deuteronomy ...


4

James Ussher, in his Annals of the World (first published in 1658), writes: “Phlegon stated that in the 19th year of Tiberius (as Eustathius Antiochus noted in Hexaemeron) and the fourth year of the 202nd Olympiad (that is 33 AD), the following events took place... 'There was a large and most famous eclipse that had ever occurred. The day was so ...


4

One problem with finding an answer to this important question is that there are conflicting views as to which Pharaohs ruled when. There is an Egyptologist who says it was NOT Thutmose III who was on the throne at the time of Israel’s oppression, as is commonly thought. He has Khaneferre Sobekhotep IV on the throne when Moses fled Egypt into Sinai. Forty ...


4

Are there any extra-biblical writings that documents what the early Christians believed about the second coming of Christ? Of course there are! The following have all written about it: Didache The Epistle of Barnabas (70 AD - 132 AD) Tertullian (155 AD - 222AD) Irenaeus (130 AD - 202 AD) Lactantius (250AD - 325 AD) Hippolytus (170 AD -230 AD) The Shepherd ...


3

There are various passages in the New Testament and early Christian writers which have been interpreted to imply or support infant baptism. However, since you ask for explicit mentions, I'm going focus on ones that are unambiguous. Irenaeaus of Lyon's Against Heresies 2:22:4 hangs on the meaning of "born again" in his era. The first unambiguous discussion ...


3

If Mark and/or Luke used Matthew as a source, then it seems most plausible to me to explain their omission as disagreement with Matthew---i.e., they thought it did not actually happen. If instead they did not use Matthew as a source, then they may simply have been unaware of the tradition. In this case, it was either an invention of Matthew, or comes from ...


3

We don't know. One writing included among those attributed to the Apostolic Fathers is the Epistle of Barnabas. If the Epistle of Barnabas was written by Barnabas, then yes - Barnabas knew Paul. An ancient tradition holds that St. Peter, while en route to Antioch to meet St. Paul, appointed Ignatius to be bishop. Since Paul spent time in Antioch and ...


3

The same Rufus may have been mentioned in Polycarp's Epistle to the Philippians (ch. 9): Παρακαλῶ οὖν πάντας ὑμᾶς, πειθαρχεῖν τῷ λόγῳ τῆς δικαιοσύνης καὶ ἀσκεῖν πᾶσαν ὑπομονήν, ἣν καὶ εἴδατε κατ’ ὀφθαλμοὺς οὐ μόνον ἐν τοῖς μακαρίοις Ἰγνατίῳ καὶ Ζωσίμῳ καὶ ῾Ρούφῳ, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἐν ἄλλοις τοῖς ἐξ ὑμῶν καὶ ἐν αὐτῷ Παύλῳ καὶ τοῖς λοιποις ἀποστόλοις I ...


3

A couple of other ancient references in addition to those mentioned by curiousdannii: The Roman writer Seutonius, "The Twelve Caesars": "[Emperor Claudius] banished from Rome all the Jews, who were continually making disturbances at the instigation of one Christus." (This incident is mentioned in the Bible in Acts 18:2.) There are also two references to ...


3

Jesus and his disciples were ‘idiotes’ (Private Persons) and ‘agrammatos’ (unregistered), not enrolled in civil contracts. The reason why they paid the temple tax was because of Peter’s ‘affirmation’ that his master did. Yet Jesus instructed him that they were exempted from it. Nevertheless He paid due to Peter’s affirmation. His kingdom was not OF this ...


3

Since the question asks "what different perspectives", let me present one perspective. The answer would be "Only if those extra-Biblical texts are in harmony with the Bible" for it is written "To the law and to the testimony! If they do not speak according to this word, it is because there is no light in them. (Isaiah 8:20) However it is written "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible