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32

Answers in Genesis, an Apologetics site dedicated to defending the Bible as inerrant, gives five "reasonable" possibilities: Bear in mind that the real answer is, "we don't know for sure", and we can't answer what did happen. The best we can do is offer plausible explanations of what might have happened. Typically this is done using common rules behind ...


28

Like the forefathers of those who eventually ended up in the Promised Land, Moses's problem was that he failed to trust in God. In chapter 12 of Numbers, Aaron and Miriam oppose Moses as God's messenger and their leader. As a result, they also are refused entry to the land (by death, like Moses). Moses' problem wasn't that he misinterpreted God or thought ...


27

Of course this is more of a historical-archeological question as the Bible does not directly answer but I have stumbled across a fairly convincing argument that would place Thutmose II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Exodus. I first came across the argument in Alfred Edersheim’s Bible History. He typically pays attention to ancient monuments and secular ...


18

The answer is right there in verse 12: And the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “Because you did not believe in me, to uphold me as holy in the eyes of the people of Israel, therefore you shall not bring this assembly into the land that I have given them.” It's a classic example of lack of faith. God tells Moses to do something that doesn't sound ...


18

It's not so much that sandals or slippers are considered to be unholy, it's that they're dirty, and removing them is a sign of respect similar to removing one's hat when entering a building, or perhaps removing a nose ring when entering a strict parent's house. From the United church of God's article on the subject: Taking off your sandals was like the ...


16

This issue will be debated for a long time. However, Henry H. Halley addresses this issue with great clarity. In his book, Halley's Bible Handbook, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 113, "There are two leading opinions: Amenhotep II (1450-1420 B.C.), or Merneptah (1250-1220 B.C.). Merneptah was the son of Rameses II, who was a master ...


15

There are several issues you bring up that need to be addressed in this question, and it is going to take a little space. Only Israel? You are correct in your assumption that God loves the whole world and not just Israel. However, Israel was, indeed, specifically chosen as part of God's plan to proclaim His name throughout the world. Here is a general ...


13

The better question may be "What is it that God is jealous of?" He is righteously jealous of the devotion and affections of His people. This is mirrored in our own lives as a married individual is righteously jealous for the affections and devotion of his or her spouse. Furthermore, a father or mother is righteously jealous for the affections of their ...


13

When the Lord finished speaking to Moses on Mount Sinai, he gave him the two tablets of the covenant law, the tablets of stone inscribed by the finger of God. (Exodus 31:18, NIV) According to C.F. Keil there were only 172 words—the Decalogue in Exodus 20:2–17—that were written on the stones "by the finger of God." This would have easily fit. Nothing is ...


12

So first off, this story of Jacob "struggling with God" (in Hebrew Isra - el) is one that has puzzled people for years. There is little agreement amongst scholars about what this means. Some interpret this is a vision, others as a theophany, and still others suggest that it was simply a metaphor for the striving and struggling that Jacob had been doing all ...


11

I was just reading this EWTN article on the 10 commandments in connection with another post on this site, but it's appropriate here too. And I won't attempt to justify my Church beyond what the Catechism says: 2131 Basing itself on the mystery of the incarnate Word, the seventh ecumenical council at Nicaea justified against the iconoclasts the veneration ...


11

Sacred groves are a common feature of ancient pagan religion. A particularly accessible Western example might be Oedipus at Colonus, which is the middle play in the Theban cycle of Sophocles (following Oedipus Rex and preceding Antigone). A great deal of the action in Oedipus at Colonus takes place in a grove outside Colonus that is consecrated to the "...


9

The section you quote contains the answer: because Moses did not believe. He was told to "tell the rock... to yield its water" but instead he struck the rock twice, apparently believing God's command to be insufficient. He expected God to act in exactly the same way as He had before*, but God apparently wanted to reveal His power to Moses in a new way. As ...


9

Well, the word "manna" itself means "What is it?" so I'm not sure you're going to find a perfectly satisfactory answer to your question. :-) In addition, it was created supernaturally by God, and He didn't share the recipe. :-) Since it was a single miracle, and not something that people still eat today, no one really knows personally what it tastes like. ...


9

Many commentators throughout church history have addressed this issue, though not all of them have done so while specifically citing or quoting the passage in question. Thus, for example, we can't necessarily agree with modern editors when they tell us that the Didache (1st/2nd century) and the Apostolic Constitutions (4th century) were referring to Exodus ...


8

The short answer is: No one knows. You might think it would be a simple matter of saying, "The Exodus occurred in such-and-such a year, look up who was Pharaoh in that year, problem solved." But in practice scholars debate just when the various Pharaohs ruled, and they debate even more when the Exodus happened. I've seen theories that range from Pepi II, ...


8

The use of the word 'face' is different in these two contexts. In the first use God is said to speak to Moses 'face to face' that is not from some distant position as in a dream, or vision but speaking audibly to him while under some visible form. In other words, God spoke to Moses like a person does who is having a conversation. God spoke out of a ...


8

According to most Christian traditions, God cannot change His mind. There are those that teach that He can change His mind, a position inherent in Open Theism. However, this is seen as a heresy by most orthodox Christian traditions. It denies the omniscience of God. From http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/07/does_god_ever_change_his_mind.php In ...


8

Answers to the Biblical Questions about Moses Question 1 The idea that at any time during his life Moses didn't know that he was a Hebrew by birth has no support in the Bible. Though there is no explicit statement that he did know this during his youth and young adulthood, the story is written as if he knew all along. Here are the verses that give this ...


8

The story of Moses is in the Book of Exodus in the Bible and begins in Chapter two. It is a fascinating story and the answer to your question is addressed in: Exodus 2:10 KJV  And the child grew, and she brought him unto Pharaoh's daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses: and she said, Because I drew him out of the water. We do not ...


8

John Wesley himself explains in the preface to his notes that he very highly regarded Matthew Henry's commentary and that much of his notes were abridgements of Henry's Work. Addressing those who owned a copy he wrote: . I do not advise these, much to trouble themselves about any other exposition than Mr Henry's: this is sufficient, thro' the assistance ...


7

I'm relatively new to Catholicism, and on top of that I'm an Eastern Rite (Maronite) member so please take what I am about to say as private opinion. First off, we aren't called to uphold all the Jewish laws. I forget the passage, but Paul basically gives the statement that we have a new law in Christ and we don't have to go through circumcision, avoid ...


7

The method of deducing each date, along with the difficulties associated with each method, are documented at cresourcei.org In short: The older date (1440 BC) is primarily based on the assumption that the Bible is a reliable historical document, with the passage of time based solely upon dates and time periods given from within Scripture. Example: 1) ...


7

The field of Biblical numerology can be a pretty mirky pond. There are some clear trends (three for completion, seven for perfection, a thousand for a really big number, etc.) and a lot of speculation and conclusions that may or may not be warranted. In this case however, the answer is pretty much spelled out in another verse. The 40 years of wandering was ...


7

Jehovah's Witness have a particular affinity for "Jehovah" as the proper name of God. One of the issues they often point out is that "the LORD," which translates the Tetragrammaton YHVH, is a Jewish superstition that hass somehow corrupted and dishonored the one of whom it speaks. In [their understanding] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehovah'...


7

At the time of Nero Egypt had 7.5 million men: This country is extended as far as the Ethiopians, and Arabia the Happy, and borders upon India; it hath seven million five hundred thousand men, besides the inhabitants of Alexandria, as may be learned from the revenue of the poll tax; yet it is not ashamed to submit to the Roman government, although it hath ...


7

I don't have my notes on hand but the bible contains multiple examples of Satan performing God like signs to fool Gods people. The book of Revelations is the obvious example this, but there's more. As far as men performing magic, you also had Bar Jesus. Long story short, although it's not exactly a popular opinion, Satan is illustrated as a being with ...


7

The Bible "stories" teach us about the nature of God. They sometimes serve as a warning and other times they encourage a closer relationship with God. These stories are not casual happenings; they are recorded in the Bible as an everlasting message to God’s children. So in the case of Uzza, the Ark is the presence of God on Earth. When Uzza reached out ...


7

"and the similitude of the Lord shall he behold" (Numbers 12:8). This is the answer. The Lord only showed a representation of Himself, at times in the figure of a man. No one saw His spiritual essence. As we see elsewhere in Scripture, frequently when men saw an angel, they fell as dead men; how much more would it be to see the essence of God? Also, The ...


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