27

God and Stephen Hawking, by John C. Lennox, is a popular direct reply to The Grand Design. Alister McGrath calls it "a brilliant response," and the book won an Award of Merit in Christianity Today's 2012 Book Awards. Whether it "makes sense," as you say, to Hawking, is perhaps debatable. But Lennox is no slouch: he's a Professor at Oxford University, ...


10

You're not going to find one answer on this. To some, the existence of God is self-evident, to others it's not. Then you get into "what does self-evident mean". Some of those who say God is self-evident claim so because the complexity of creation screams "an intelligent designer made me". But that's not self-evident, it's evidence from creation. ...


8

Regarding your first question, there is a key difference between your two examples. They would be more parallel if you framed the first one like this: God is the most perfect possible being that can be thought of. Non-existence or a lack of regular competition in barbecuing championships would be an imperfection. Therefore, God exists and regularly ...


5

Here's S.Th., I, q.46, a.2, ad 7, for reference: In efficient causes it is impossible to proceed to infinity "per se"—thus, there cannot be an infinite number of causes that are "per se" required for a certain effect; for instance, that a stone be moved by a stick, the stick by the hand, and so on to infinity. But it is not impossible to ...


5

Romans 1 From a Christian perspective, yes, the existence of God is self-evidence. Paul teaches in the book of Romans about this: (I understand that atheists may take offense to this, but none is intended. This is just the teaching of the Bible.) For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by ...


5

To paraphrase your question, it seems like you're asking if the transcendence of God precludes true knowledge of God. The answer is no. The transcendence of God means that God is beyond our full comprehension. We cannot "master" God like someone can master arithmetic, or a foreign language, or how to ride a bike. Our brains can't contain everything there ...


4

John Lennox's book: Gunning for God - Why the New Atheists are Missing the Target directly covers and quotes this exact passage from Hawking you quoted, and addresses it. I am reading it at the moment.


3

That version of the Cosmological Argument simply points to the universe having a cause. The Christian response would be that the cause is God. Science confirms that the universe must have had a beginning. The Christian view is that something that does not need to be given existence must exist to give everything else existence. That something is God. God ...


3

DISTINCTION OF ACT AND POTENCY. This distinction arose from the Parmenides objection. Let me summarise the argument why the change is not possible and then I will resolve the argument. Proposition (Parmenides): Change is not possible. Proof: A thing either is or is not. If it is, it is being; if it is not, it is non-being or nothing. Change requires that ...


2

The premise in the question : Does this signify that there is in fact no reason for God to mind the existence of other fictional Gods, which further implies that God actually doesn't care about us and that we are just created and left to our own devices? . . is incorrect. God has specifically stated : Thou shalt have no other gods before me [Exodus ...


1

The trilemma is NOT C.S. Lewis's only reason on why he came to the conclusion that Jesus is God (he covered this topic in his other books). I think C.S. Lewis used this logic in Mere Christianity only to refute the false assertion that Jesus was a mere teacher. It was intended as a short summary to brush away a distraction from the main meat of the book: an ...


1

why do we come to say that he is God simply like that if he could also be a lunatic or something worse?  Lewis, at this point in the book, is arguing against a specific view of Jesus - namely that he was a wise man, a good man, a great teacher - but not God! It's a widely held view among people who haven't looked closely at the Gospels, and it's a ...


1

RE falsity of premise 5: The point of the proof is that if some thing 1 makes the putative first mover (thing 1') be the way it is, that thing 1 is really the first mover of whatever changes are laid to the putative first (1'). That thing 1 is the first mover really; and it cannot be made to be the way it is by some other thing 3 or else it is merely ...


1

short answer The reason there are many religions in the world is because there are many gods who initially were intermediaries between God and man but they rebelled and took worship for themselves. longer answer There are three major reasons for the state of the world today Adam’s fall vía the deception of the serpentine being of Eve Genesis 3 The ...


1

This question doesn't ask for a specific denomination's viewpoint. Some denominations have considered this questions though, and do have an answer. Galatians 1:4 refers to our "present evil age". 2 Cor 4:4 refers to Satan as "the god of this world". God is allowing Satan to influence humanity, and allowing humanity to behave as it sees best, in order to ...


1

I won't make any statements about the mathematical, philosophical or theological implications of the proof. But I can help you with the maths (this would better done on math.SE). Make a order of the sets: A set A is greater or equal than a set B iff B is a subset or equal of A. A maximal element set (God) is maximal in this order, so it has no set that is a ...


1

The Last Superstition By Edward Feser addresses this. Also, Modern Physics and Ancient Faith Also try Answering Atheism


1

At present, not much of one. The ontological argument along its traditional lines, wherein God is allegedly proven to exist because the greatest being is an existent being, has been criticized by numerous Christian theologians. Most notably, I think, is that St. Thomas Aquinas rejected it on the grounds that only God could know God's nature; hence, any ...


1

The greatest thinkers of the time (including the great theologian Thomas Aquinas, the Doctor Universalis of the Catholic church) rejected it. To quote from Wikipedia, The first critic of the ontological argument was Anselm's contemporary, Gaunilo of Marmoutiers. He used the analogy of a perfect island, suggesting that the ontological could be used to ...


1

I find it interesting among all the answers given that the issue of spoken and answered prophecy has not been raised. In the bible, God gives us sneak previews of the coming Messiah so that when He comes we may recognize Him. Such lists of OT texts fulfilled in the NT are populated all over the 'net. To have even just 25 of those prophecies come true in one ...


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