16

Born-again protestant Christians are not "against" Mary of Nazareth. Every one of them accepts Mary as the Mother of Jesus, and while few would use the phrase, they have no issue with the concept of Mary as the Mother of God. That said, all but a few protestants, including nearly all who would self-identify as "born-again" reject most of the teachings about ...


15

The "Evangelical" movement spreads across an incredibly wide range of beliefs, so it will be hard to nail this down, but a few things come to mind that ought to have broad acceptance and make at least some form of answer possible. For convenience in the rest of this answer, please treat the word "Evangelical" merely as broadly representing "Most Evangelicals"...


10

Evangelicals would say that there were faithful churches who kept the gospel before the reformation. I think there are two historical factors involved: Protestants recognise several movements of like-minded people before the reformation, such as the Lollards and Hussites. I think that Luther himself at one time admitted that his own beliefs essentially were ...


10

There are two main Protestant arguments against asking the deceased saints to intercede for us: It is seen as contradicting the Bible's prohibition on contacting the dead. These are found most clearly in the Jewish Law, which is not binding on Christians, but is still considered to be solid wisdom in this case. Do not turn to mediums or seek out ...


9

The Practice of the Presence of God is one of a variety of different Christian "classics" which really cross denominational boundaries (Imitation of Christ might be another). Since the truths it discusses are universal to Christianity and because there is very little in the document which must be Catholic, its benefits are generally considered to far ...


9

If there's any one denomination finds itself consistently in accord with "broad evangelicalism," it's gotta be the Southern Baptist Convention. Certainly that's true on this issue; article 4 of the Baptist Faith and Message says: In its broadest sense salvation includes regeneration, justification, sanctification, and glorification. [...] ...


8

Apologize for he length, the question is so good that I am answering not just for you but digging up worthy references for myself. A good place to start for an evangelical answer is with two evangelical theologians famous for having an acute sense of the sinfulness of man and the nature of God's grace in the Christian. John Owen and Jonathan Edwards both ...


8

Rob Bell is identified with a Emergent Church despite not self identify as a member of the emergent movement. However, he tends to advocate many of the ideas of that group. Case in point, Love Wins, which came out last year, was hugely controversial, since it was putting forward a view on the nature of hell which is not held by many evangelical Christians. ...


8

Simply put Evangelicals differ over at least three primary things: 1. The Nature of Jesus Evangelicals believe Jesus to be God - of one being with Father, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, etc... Mormons do not. Mormons believe Jesus to be divine, but a separate person from the Father. Evangelicals tend to subscribe to the historic ...


8

The phrase "God-breathed" is a translation of the etymological roots of the Greek θεόπνευστος. Most English versions of the Bible translate this Greek word as "inspired by God". ("Inspire" is derived from the Latin word inspiratio, which like πνευστος, originally denoted breath or spirit.) There is no consensus on what it means to say that all Scripture is ...


8

Note that this doesn't apply to all groups that adhere to Sola Fide. Plenty of groups believe that we have no part in our own salvation, even in choosing to believe, but this is one perspective that's relatively common among Evangelicals. Short version: These verses are simply Jesus teaching on the true definition of what God's standard for "good" is. ...


8

Behold thy mother: What Does Jesus Mean By Such Utterance in John 19:26-27? The teaching of the Roman Catholic church that Jesus entrusted his physical mother as the spiritual mother of the church is unfounded in these texts. In fact, that sort of interpretation is out of context. Jesus entrusted his mother to the care of John (John 19:26,27). Jesus ...


8

The statement of "choosing to go to hell" is an over-simplification that really is an example of intellectual laziness, and is a great example of the difference between the "true theology" of a group and the type of pop-theology that springs up and causes great confusion. Looking at it from any side, saying that people choose to go to hell does not make ...


8

For Evangelicals, "receiving Jesus" can be considered to be functionally equivalent to one or more of the following: Regeneration Being born again Receiving the (indwelling) Holy Spirit Being justified by faith Being adopted into the family of God Being saved Conversion Making a decision Praying through Evangelicalism is somewhat of a moveable feast and ...


7

As covered in From a Fundamentalist standpoint, what does the phrase "Inspired, infallible, inerrant Word of God" mean? Definition of the term "Inspired": The doctrine of the inspiration of the Bible means that the Bible in the original documents is God-breathed, that it is a divine product, and, because it is divine, the original documents are ...


7

My short answer is yes, they are compatible but you're correct to observe a shift in emphasis. The reason for the divergence in eastern and western thought is that in the Bible there are a variety of different analogies and explanations for the nature of salvation. The west at some point latched more onto the juridicial/courtroom analogies, while the east ...


7

Amongst non-denominational evangelicals, a Christian is often regarded as being synonymous with someone who has been born again (regenerated) a la John 3:3 - Jesus replied, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.” - John 3:3 NIV They regard regeneration (or 'getting saved') as something that occurs if and ...


7

From Barnes' Notes on the Bible: The more obvious signification is, that there is a sense in which it may be said that the cup is blessed, and that by prayer and praise it is set apart and rendered in some sense sacred to the purposes of religion. it cannot mean that the cup has undergone any physical change, or that the wine is anything but wine; ...


7

Evangelicalism is a pretty wide spectrum, and there are certainly many branches of it that have little issue with calling their belief system a "religion." After all, John Calvin wrote the Institutes of the Christian Religion, and theologians like B. B. Warfield talk about true Christianity as "religion in its purity" (Selected Shorter ...


6

One of the founding ideas of Protestantism was "sola scriptura", meaning that we view the Bible as the only ultimate authority. That doesn't mean that we refuse to read any other books. The existence of thousands of Baptist bookstores should be adequate proof that that's not true. What it means is that we do not view any book other than the Bible as having ...


6

Of course the answer will depend on which Christian tradition the answerer comes from, but since you requested passages from Scripture on the matter, here are a few to consider: Is Jesus your Lord? if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved -Romans 10:9 Do you live for Jesus? ...


6

As you mention, evangelicalism refers to a movement that typically emphasizes salvation through faith in Christ, the authority of the Bible, evangelism, and a conversion experience. On the other hand, presbyterianism refers primarily to a form of church government. In this system, elders rule the church – a session of elders is responsible for leading ...


6

Protestants regard Mary as an honored servant of God. Generally they think the Roman and Orthodox churches are somewhat excessive with doctrines which are not found in the Bible and which place Mary above the status of a righteous person who nevertheless had faults. My apologies for those who are argumentative about it. Mary is a blessed woman who was ...


6

Excommunication refers to a church putting a person outside of their communion - in less jargony terms we could say that it refers to declaring that a person is no longer a member of a church. The National Association of Evangelicals is an inter-denominational fellowship of over 40 denominations and 45 thousand individual congregations. The NAE is not a ...


6

It is important to look at the context of Revelation 9:11. The Destroyer is released from the abyss by the star that fell from heaven. And the fifth angel sounded, and I saw a star fall from heaven unto the earth: and to him was given the key of the bottomless pit. -- Revelation 9:1 Given this, there can be no doubt that Satan is the one responsible ...


6

I identify as an evangelical universalist. I don't know if you'll find this worthwhile, but here's my take. It sounds an awful lot like a figure of speech to me. If it is, it's best not to draw too many conclusions based on it. (Bart Ehrman left the faith because the mustard seed isn't really the smallest of all seeds.) In support of the figure of speech ...


6

Evangelical commentators generally hold that Paul is speaking authoritatively in 1 Corinthians 7:12, and only indicating that he was not aware of any direct teaching on this subject by Jesus during his earthly ministry. The Reformation Study Bible explains: With regard to the problem treated in vv. 10, 11, there was a well-known instruction given by Jesus ...


6

Much of the popular usage of "religion" in the negative isn't relegated to any particular denomination of evangelical Protestants, and if you consult theologians in that denomination they wouldn't use it in the negative. Usually, simply quoting James 1:27 gets them saying, "Oh, well not religion like THAT." When used in the negative, they tend to mean ...


5

As a matter of chronology, yes, the United States was the first major Christian country (and it was fairly substantial, even at the time of the Revolution) to not require the establishment of a particular state church. Not all colonies had established churches (Rhode Island, since 1636!, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, etc...) but most colonies disestablished in ...


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