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19

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: 2416: Animals deserve kindness as they are God's creation and under His care. Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory. Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of ...


14

I will try to answer the question entirely from a Catholic perspective, as that seems to be what the question demands. The classic determination of a moral act has three parts (CCC 1749-1761): Is the act intrinsically immoral --- which is to say, wrong in every circumstance --- by its very nature? Is the intention good, or bad? Would the circumstances ...


12

The most word used is "porneia" (πορνεία), and according to Strong's means "illicit sexual intercourse" - particularly fornication, or sexual intercourse outside marriage. This of course is the real point here - Paul isn't slamming sexual desire and intercourse as a bad thing - look at Song of Solomon. What he is warning against is sex in the absence of the ...


11

The "Just War" is a concept very widely accepted by Christians - at least in the sense of acknowledging that there are conditions when Christians are called to fight. Catholics accept it, Anglicans do in principle (though some disagree), so do Lutherans, and many Baptists. They may not all agree on the conditions for fighting a 'just war', but they do ...


11

There are many different Christian perspectives and some may disagree, but it's arguable that at least a majority of Christians would agree that: A Christian should respond as Jesus would and according to what He taught: 38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ 39 But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone ...


10

I would like to add to the ltcomdata's excellent exposition of classic Catholic ethical theory with a couple of considerations. TL;DR The Church condemns contraception—that is, impeding the fecundity of an otherwise fertile sexual act—because it is harmful in various ways to the persons (particularly the married couples) who take part in it. In particular, ...


10

Philippians 4:8 is an excellent guide when considering whether the lyrics in a song, or the words in a book, or a television programme, are appropriate for a Christian to read/see: Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—...


9

This is a matter of conscience, quite clearly. I well know how these matters may be viewed by the ungodly as I was disciplined in a certain company many years ago (final written warning on the first instance of its occurrence) because of this very issue arising, suddenly, without my being prepared to meet it and I reacted in a way which was unacceptable to ...


8

I spent most of my formative years in a Mennonite church, and identify with the Mennonite concept of pacifism. So I will attempt to answer from a Mennonite Pacifist perspective, based primarily on my understanding, as taught to me by Mennonites, of this view (as opposed to my personal opinion on this view, which does vary slightly on a few points), and when ...


8

From the Recapitulatio of Fr. Réginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.'s De Virtutibus Theologicis (p. 20), a commentary on St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica II-II, he gives the following categorization of the virtues (virtutes), following the organization of St. Thomas's treatment of the virtues in his Summa: Here's a rough translation: The Virtues ...


8

From the Catholic Encyclopedia article "Cruelty to Animals," a quote from Cardinal Manning, in which he says that man must show mercy to animals, not for their sakes, but for our and God's sakes: It is perfectly true that obligations and duties are between moral persons, and therefore the lower animals are not susceptible of the moral obligations which we ...


8

Is using medication or vaccines derived from tissue of aborted fetuses compatible with Catholic teaching? The short answer is no, but it is a little more complicated than a simple one word answer. Apparently there is at least one Catholic Bishop who is speaking against this calling it a possible beginning of the apocalypse in this YouTube video: Abortion-...


7

Its not necessary for a person to have a religion to have good moral codes. Hammurabi (1792-1750 BC) was a Babylonian King who gave one of the First Law in the World. The law was very similar the Mosaic Law, "Eye for eye, tooth for tooth". Exodus 21:24 Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, 25 burn for burn, wound for wound, ...


6

Yes, it appears from the description that Jeremiah was not completely honest with the officials. They probably were asking about Jeremiah's prophecies, and he did not tell them what they wanted to know. Whether this is technically lying depends on exactly what questions were asked and exactly what answers Jeremiah gave, but it's pretty clear that Jeremiah ...


6

The Catechism is explicit. 1754 The circumstances, including the consequences, are secondary elements of a moral act. They contribute to increasing or diminishing the moral goodness or evil of human acts (for example, the amount of a theft). They can also diminish or increase the agent's responsibility (such as acting out of a fear of death). Circumstances ...


6

The existence of Moral absolutism is actually fairly easily identified biblically in verses such as: Then the LORD God said, "Behold, the man has become like one of us in knowing good and evil. Now, lest he reach out his hand and take also of the tree of life and eat, and live forever-" - Genesis 3:22 ESV In which God specifies that Good and evil exist,...


5

I have not heard any Christian claim this in any academic setting. The most Christians usually say about morality in this context is that without a transcendent law giver no absolute morality can be derived and that without one we are left with either a regress into subjectivity or a complete denial of morality. Or in other words if God is dead than all ...


5

The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that every human body is human because it has a soul imparted by God. 364 The human body shares in the dignity of "the image of God": it is a human body precisely because it is animated by a spiritual soul, and it is the whole human person that is intended to become, in the body of Christ, a temple of ...


5

Ananias and Sapphira were killed for telling a "white lie." They sold a piece of land and told everyone that they were giving all the money to the church. However, they actually kept back some. Peter says they were punished not for keeping their money, but for for lying about it. Acts 5:1-11 But a man named Ananias, with his wife Sapphira, sold a piece of ...


5

Secular Music and Christian Standards? If you do not mind I would like to answer your question from a Catholic perspective (which I think would be appropriate to some degree to other Christian denominations). For the most part this question will depend on the lyrics. The tempo and beat are are of less importance to some degree, but should not be entirely ...


5

I do not have own insights to this topic, but I want to point to some statements of representants of the Catholic Church. In the last month many dealt with this topic, e.g the Bishops Conferences of the UK, the US, Ireland and Slowakia (source, German). The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (Chairmen of the Committee on Doctrine and the Committee ...


5

I wish to know both ethical considerations involved and how to identify which Covid-19 vaccinations might have such ethically questionable ‘ingredients'. How to identify The Pro-Life Charlotte Lozier Institute maintains an up to date, complete with references, but easy to read table of coronavirus vaccines (pdf version here). Each vaccine has 3 ethical ...


5

What ethical considerations, if any, should Catholic have about cryptocurrencies? An article published on 19 July 2017 suggested that the Vatican may launch a “blessed” cryptocurrency, taxed in favour of the world’s poor. One fear is that nefarious traders would continue their schemes, now under the blessing palms of the Pope. Part of the article said: It ...


4

I think your friend either misunderstands you or Lewis. You will find a nice essay by David Allred, comparing C.S. Lewis and Plato, at "Into the Wardrobe". Things in themselves It is perfectly Christian to reflect that all things in themselves are good. Indeed, Paul asserted the idea just as clearly: "I am convinced, being fully persuaded in the Lord Jesus,...


4

TL;DR: Bribes that pervert justice are condemned, but gifts which curry favour are allowed and sometimes even a sign of wisdom. שׁחד The Hebrew word for 'bribe' in these verses is the root שׁחד. It only occurs 25 times in the Hebrew Bible which means we can do a comprehensive word study pretty easily. Below I will list most of the verses with this root. I ...


3

Summary: No, the Just War doctrine is not intended to provide guidance at this level of detail. First a brief summary of what the Just War Doctrine is. It's intended to be an answer to the question of whether a Christian can morally fight in a war, and the very brief summary is: "A Christian can fight in a war, as long as it is 'Just'". Many Christian ...


3

Because "good" is either a transcendent qualifier or a personal one. If it is a personal one, then it becomes meaningless, as everyone would be perfectly "good" by their own personal moral codes. If, on the other hand, it is a transcendent one, then that "good" is measured against a higher standard. The contention is that without religion, people don't ...


3

There are some obvious things that could be said about this question (the Bible citations for why anyone would do or not do these specific things are pretty easy). A few less obvious things to bring up with this question: Catholics (as do many Christians and non-Christians) value the virtue of prudence - it is not enough to know that a certain act is just, ...


3

The morality of an act depends on three things what is done (the object), why it is done (the intention) and the circumstances. 1750 The morality of human acts depends on: the object chosen; the end in view or the intention; the circumstances of the action. The object, the intention, and the circumstances make up the "sources," or ...


3

is it ever permissible to produce physical evil so that good may result? Yes, it is permissible to destroy ("produce physical evil") in order to effect good. The human manner of creating things always involves destruction because we create with preexisting matter; only God can create something "out of nothing" (creatio ex nihilo). Creation in itself is ...


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