31

If they were wearing name tags, they were probably official LDS missionaries. Even if not, Latter-day Saints are allowed to (and in fact, are encouraged to) proselytize informally and refer potential converts to official LDS missionaries. The LDS have a specific set of procedures and practices for seeking out, encouraging, vetting, and accepting new members, ...


21

Protestant reformers were at pains to argue that all they sought to do was restore the church to purity which had become corrupted in medieval times. They wanted to ensure that their teachings were not just in line with Scripture but with many of the church fathers e.g. Augustine. You will find that the writings of the reformers are full of quotes to many ...


17

It is worth pointing out that even if you take the stance that the verse is saying that Peter had some kind of special status, there is nothing that indicates that that authority is continued in his line. Every other place I can think of where a lineage related authority is granted, it is pretty clearly laid out by God in scripture. (For example the ...


15

Protestants typically interpret this verse to be referring to Christ, the Chief Cornerstone, when he speaks of the rock upon which the church will be built. Greek Grammar One reason for this is that Peter as a proper name for Simon is masculine in form -- petros (Strong's G4074). When Jesus says "on this rock", the word for "rock" is feminine -- petra (...


15

There is debate on the actual meaning of verse 18, particularly what "his rock" is. Is it Peter? Or is it the Truth that Peter told in verse 16? Many Protestants believe that it is referring to the thing Peter said - that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of the living God. Jesus will build His Church based on who He is. Barnes' Notes on the Bible ...


10

In a word, No: there is no Catholic teaching which differentiates the Body of Christ and the Bride of Christ. The Catechism of the Catholic Church holds that the Church is the Body of Christ and the Bride of Christ. Adam prefigures Jesus, the "second Adam". Just as Adam was perfect and became sinful, so Christ took on sin and conquered the death ...


10

Martin Luther had not intended to separate from the Catholic Church. His 95 theses, and his conduct immediately after he posted them, were intended to achieve reform in the Catholic Church. When he was excommunicated by Rome, he had to either give up his quest for reform or continue to pursue it outside the Catholic Church. Bear in mind that there may ...


10

It is clear from John Knox's words, recorded at his meeting with Queen Mary at Holyrood in 1561 (accompanied by Lord James Stewart) that the reformer regarded the Papacy to be an intrusion and the mass to be an idolatrous sacrifice. He quite clearly regards both to be without warrant, from their inception. ‘Take one of the chief points, Madam, which this ...


9

As I understand it all Jewish brides are stolen, they are snatched away. All Jewish brides were said to be “stolen, caught up, or snatched up by surprise.” The bride was then led to the groom’s house by a wedding procession of women carrying lighted lamps, similar to the Parable of the Ten Virgins that we will explore in next month’s Personal ...


9

On one hand, they refer to the same entity, the church. On the other hand, when the Bible uses these terms, it refers to different aspects of the church. In brief, the Body and the Bride both refer to the church. However, the Body emphasizes how the church fully expresses Christ as the church, and the Bride emphasizes how the church is Christ's intimate, ...


9

The Church is holy, but it is an institution which is populated by human beings, who can and do sin. This can be seen in the first few chapters of the book of Revelation where the Angel catalogs the sins of the seven churches. In his apology, the Bishop of Rome is merely acknowledging the sinfulness, individually and collectively, of members of the church, ...


9

I agree that Baptism is an outward expression of an inward change and isn't what saves you, yet even so, it is important to be baptised for three excellent reasons: It is a rite of initiation into the Christian community - Although our confession before God (of our faith in Christ and his Lordship over us) is of primary importance, Public confession of our ...


9

Most of the cardinals don't live (most of the time) in the neighborhood of the Vatican. So, probably, once the Church as a whole got over the shock, they'd convene the college of cardinals in some appropriate place and elect a new Pope. Now if (as Caleb hypothesizes in his comment) the college of cardinals were largely or entirely wiped out as well, then ...


9

The Latter Day Saints allows investigators and seekers of truth to take the sacrament and to join church activities and quorums, for nearly full transparency. You only become a member if you get interviewed by the Bishop/rank holder and get baptized. They pray quietly the prayer of acceptance over you without your knowledge. That's like if a Mormon ...


8

The ecclesiology of Augustine and the ecclesiology of the Reformers were both very much products of the times they lived in: In Augustine's case as well as sourcing a basic understanding on ecclesiology from scripture and tradition, any development of his thinking in this area was greatly influenced by the problems the Church had been facing - especially in ...


7

Christians who consider each congregation to have no higher authority structures than its own elders or ministers do not think that these verses suggest anything else. These were new churches, having just been started by Paul and his associates, but without sustainable endemic leadership, so they needed to be kickstarted by Timothy and Titus. Once they ...


6

In Catholicism, the marks of the Church are that she is one holy catholic apostolic these words are taken from the second part of the Nicene creed, which is commonly prayed at every Mass and the tenents of which are generally accepted by mainline Protestant denominations. I think, but have very little basis for this thought, that Protestant reformers ...


6

Your friend may be confusing a "secret" prayer of acceptance (whatever that may be) with the Mormon practice of what had been their secret "baptism for the dead". This practice came under scrutiny and criticism by other groups and LDS now says the dead have a choice whether to accept the baptism by proxy or not. Presumably if there were some sort of "...


6

From experience as one who has both been one of those two men on the street, and am currently serving as a Ward Clerk, and whose responsibility it is to keep the records of my local congregation (positions in the church are all lay positions - we don't get paid anything), I can confirm that your friend has some misconceptions (though I don't speak for the ...


5

Many churches which do believe that baptism is symbolic also restrict participation in their services and church life to those who have been baptised: Many churches limit church membership to baptised people Some churches limit communion to baptised people (and some to members too) Some churches limit roles like service leading and preaching to baptised ...


5

One claim is that it's a translation issue. "Peter" means "rock", so when Jesus says, "you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church" there's a bit of a play of words going on. Pretty much everyone agrees on at least that much. However, depending on which manuscript set you trust and your interpretation, it's a different word for rock for Peter's ...


5

Reformed theologians, including Reformed Baptists, typically believe that the church includes all true believers of all time, both Old Testament and New Testament. This view naturally follows from covenant theology, which argues that there is one covenant, a covenant of grace, that has been in effect ever since the Fall. Let's review the writings of a ...


5

Short answer: no, it's not a fair assessment, particularly in light of what the Church itself professes. The assertion being made is much like asserting that the Soldiers aren't really the Army, but that the Generals are. As such, it takes on the character of a false dichotomy and is a flawed premise, since the Church as it exists isn't an either-or ...


5

To answer your question: no. There is no secret adding to the church done by members of the LDS faith. The only way to become a member is to become baptized which takes a process of proving your interest and going through interviews, none of which could be done behind your back :) The two members that talked with you were simply sharing their faith hoping ...


5

I've been watching this question for a few days now and decided that today I would hazard a Wikipedia-fueled attempt at finding a plausible answer. Here goes... The word "Catholic" in reference to a specific organization seemed to be originally used to distinguish the Church of God from the churches of heretics. The earliest form of this use I found was ...


5

Though it was historically attributed to Augustine, this letter was actually written by Fulgentius of Ruspe in the early 6th century. It appears in English in volume 95 of the series The Fathers of the Church, page 59. The introduction there notes the historical context and briefly discusses the authorship debate. In answer to Peter's request [for a ...


5

[The Law of Common Consent] is that in God’s earthly kingdom, the King counsels what should be done, but then he allows his subjects to accept or reject his proposals. Unless the principle of free agency is operated in righteousness men do not progress to ultimate salvation in the heavenly kingdom hereafter. Accordingly, church officers are selected by the ...


5

"Indefectibility" is, according to Catholic Dictionary by Fr. John Hardon, S.J., the Imperishable duration of the Church and her immutability until the end of time. The First Vatican Council declared that the Church possesses an invincible stabilityinvictamque stabilitatem and that, being founded upon the Rock, will stand firm to the end of the ...


4

The Church is referred to as the "Bride of Christ" throughout the NT. It's capitalization simply reflects it's status as a proper noun, subject to capitalization.


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