7

Fr. Ronald Knox (a good guy to read if you're a fan of Chesterton) wrote: In a word, we are treating material objects and vocal formulas as the occasions upon which God himself will see fit to bestow a blessing upon us, in answer to the prayers offered when the object was hallowed, or the formula instituted. An exception must, of course, be made in favour ...


6

There are really only two requirements for becoming pope: being male and being baptized into the Catholic Church. Canon 332 § 1 of the 1983 Code simply states that one already a bishop (nb: not necessarily a cardinal) who accepts legitimate papal election becomes pope immediately. One who is not yet a bishop (and the Church has elected several non-bishops ...


6

The short answer is that, correctly understood, Miaphysitism can be compatible with the Catholic Faith. In order to see how this is so, it is important to understand carefully what Catholics understand by “Miaphysistism.” This position refers to a formula attributed to St. Cyril of Alexandria, intended to defend the so-called “communion of properties” in ...


6

There is no such distinction between "mortal" and "venial" sin in the fashion you suggest within the Eastern Orthodox Church, but it must also be understood that sin, as well as the related concepts of grace and free will, is understood completely differently in the Orthodox Church. Sin, within the Eastern Orthodox Church, is seen as a ...


5

The Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches codifies common portions of the canon law of all the Eastern Catholic Churches within the (Roman) Catholic Church. Canon 883 says The Christian faithful who are outside the territorial boundaries of their own Church sui juris can adopt fully for themselves the feast days and days of penance which are in force ...


4

There has been long-standing tradition of Syrian Catholics of Kerala, Southern India getting ordained as parish priests of churches belonging to Latin Rite dioceses and some of them even becoming Bishops of the dioceses within the Roman Rite.


3

Idolatry Idolatry is, as the name suggests, that which concerns the worship of idols. Since they (idols) are not God, idolatry is the worship of whatever is not God. That is, anything that is not God; a creature of God. What is the difference between icons and idols in churches that permit icons? The difference is in the fact that an idol is anything which ...


3

First of all, the Catholic Church admits that both Rome and Antioch(Orthodox) have a line of succession starting with St. Peter. Speaking of the apostolic succession of Antioch, the Catholic Encyclopedia says : "The first Bishop of Antioch after St. Peter..." [...] http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05653a.htm Second of all, the Orthodox Church, ...


3

The 4th Session of the Council of Trent on the Canonical Scriptures authorized "the old Latin vulgate" as the official edition of the whole Church:But if any one receive not, as sacred and canonical, the said books entire with all their parts, as they have been preserved to be read in the Catholic Church (prout in ecclesia catholica legi consueverunt), and ...


3

Your statement is correct in principle, but the vocabulary could lead to some incorrect conclusions. the father does not require the son or holy spirit to exist could be understood to mean that at some time the Father could have existed (or possibly even did exist) without the Son or the Spirit existing. This is not correct as the Son and the Spirit ...


3

For the Eastern Orthodox Church: Magnificat: Sung at daily Matins, after the Psalter readings and Psalm 50 (LXX) Benedictus: I don't believe is sung regularly at any service. It is, however, the Gospel reading for Matins and the Divine Liturgy on the Feast Day of the Nativity of John the Baptist (June 24) Nunc Dimittis: Read during each daily Vespers, near ...


2

I don't know if there has been a solemn definition of the doctrine by a pope or council, but this definition is part of the deposit of faith. It is defined exactly as you state in the Catechism of the Catholic Church in point 1857, and the distinction between venial and mortal sin is also defined in point 1854. Point 1854 states: "Sins are rightly evaluated ...


2

The Latin Vulgate is the version of the Bible preferred in the Latin Rite. The History of the Vulgate Text from the Council of Trent to the Present Day On April 8, 1546, two Biblical Decrees were solemnly promulgated by the Tridentine Fathers. The first, called "Sacrosancta," declares the Catholic rule of faith in regard to the Sacred Scriptures by ...


2

The transition of a Eastern Catholic to the Latin church is ruled by cann. 31 - 38 CCEO. Only relevant is here can. 32: Can. 32 - § 1. No one can validly transfer to another Church sui iuris without the consent of the Apostolic See. § 2. In the case of Christian faithful of an eparchy of a certain Church sui iuris who petition to transfer to another ...


1

Are there any known Eastern Catholics who have received the stigmata? There is at least one. Saint Mariam Baouardy, known a in religion as Mary of Jesus Crucified. She is affectionately called by many as the Little Arab. Mariam Baouardy was born on 5 January 1846 in Ibillin, a small village of Galilee, between Nazareth and Haifa, in a Greek-Melkite Catholic ...


1

Yes, recognised in the sense that they can never be rejected as a saint. A saint is someone in heaven. Therefore St. Isaac of Nineveh is either in heaven or not. The Catholic church is "one", that would mean that St. Isaac of Nineveh cannot be a saint in the Catholic Church in Damascus and cease to be a saint in Paris. St. Isaac of Nineveh is either in ...


1

Have any Catholics (e.g. Eastern Rite) ever followed the Old Calendar since the late 16th century? Since 1923 Eastern Rite Catholic follow a modified Gregorian calendar, while keeping some of the nuances of the Julian calendar. Traditionally, the Eastern Orthodox and Byzantine Catholic churches use the Julian Calendar to calculate their feast days. ...


1

As Wtrmute mentioned, #2 & #3 are necessary for sin because sin is a bad human act, or as St. Augustine defined sin, "Sin is a word, deed, or desire against the eternal law." (Contra Faust. xxii). Since sin is a human act, the will is the subject of sin; there's no such thing as an involuntary sin. Regarding #1, chapter 15 of the 6th session of ...


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