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14

Liturgy Brisbane calls it "Holy Saturday." According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, it is a day of both joy and sadness, and "in the early Church this was the only Saturday on which fasting was permitted, and the fast was one of special severity. Dating from the time of St. Irenaeus, an absolute fast from every kind of food was observed for the ...


10

The bee represents Mary, the mother of Jesus. (In fact, it's a fairly safe bet that just about anything represents Jesus or Mary or both.) Other versions of the Exultet text make this explicit; the "Franco-Roman version" has a long we-love-bees section, as recorded by Thomas Forrest Kelley in his The Exultet in Southern Italy (OUP, 1996), p38, ...


9

Apparently, per Wikipedia, this date corresponds to Nisan 14, converting the date from the Hebrew Calendar to the Gregorian Calendar. I don't believe they're saying it happened on a Tuesday. In 2012, it was a Thursday.


8

It seems that the Catholic tradition of eating lamb at Easter was first documented in the 7th century: “The oldest prayer for the blessing of lambs can be found in the seventh-century sacramentary (ritual book) of the Benedictine monastery, Bobbio in Italy. Two hundred years later Rome had adopted it, and thereafter the main feature of the Pope's Easter ...


7

In harmony with Jesus command to "Keep doing this in remembrance of me", we observe the memorial of Jesus death every year on Nisan 14 after sundown. (Luke 22:19) This does not always fall on the same day of the week for us. Jesus death occurred on Nisan 14 of the Jewish calendar that was common during the first century. Since the Jewish day begins and ends ...


7

In context, the hymn is saying the 'fortunate fault' brought about the greater good, salvation from Jesus. It traces its idea back to Augustine, who wrote: For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist. (Enchiridion 8)


7

The Bible does not say on which day of the week Jesus was crucified. There are therefore three views of crucifixion day held currently: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday with Friday being the most commonly held view. Some Christians believe Wednesday was the day of Jesus crucifixion , and a few held the Thursday view. That said, beside United Church of ...


7

Jehovah's Witnesses time their Memorial based on the current apparent movements of the actual physical moon and sun, as observable from Jerusalem. This, they say, is what happened in first century Judaism. The rule is not exactly the first full moon following the equinox, but the result is very close to this. Jews and Christians base Passover and Easter, ...


7

The Orthodox Churches continue to use the Julian Calendar with the result the equinox is assumed to be 13 days later than it really is. March 21 Julian is April 3 in the Gregorian Calendar commonly used. This is fairly well known, but less known is that the Eastern Churches continue to use the Dionysian tabulation for the dates of full moons, whereas in the ...


7

Jehovah's Witnesses observe the Memorial of Jesus' Death (also called the Lord's Evening Meal) after sundown on the day that coincides with Nisan 14th according to the ancient Jewish calendar. Nisan 14th may be on any day of the week from year to year, so the fact that it's on a Saturday this year has no relevance. In 2017 it was on a Tuesday, and in 2016 it ...


6

There are a few ways to look at the origin of the word Easter: That it comes from Eostre, an ancient Germanic goddess That it comes from Eosturmonath, or "month of beginnings" That it comes from Anglo-Saxon eastre, meaning dawn Bede The primary historical account of the origin of Easter comes from Bede's De temporum ratione (The Reckoning of Time,...


6

Luke 23:27-31 tells us that certain women lamented as Jesus carried his cross to Golgotha. At this stage, there is no mention of Veronica or of anyone wiping Jesus' face. The apocryphal Acts of Pilate (an extant copy of which is contained in the Gospel of Nicodemus, dated at around the fourth century, expanded on Luke's brief passage, saying that one of ...


6

There is a tradition in the Eastern Orthodox Church that the saying was made popular by Mary Magdalene when she supposedly addressed Emperor Tiberius in Rome with the words “Christ is risen.” Mary Magdalene witnessed most of the events surrounding the crucifixion. She was present at the mock trial of Jesus; she heard Pontius Pilate pronounce the death ...


5

Mark's Gospel was the first New Testament gospel to be written, and John Dominic Crossan says, in The Birth of Christianity, page 110-111, there is a massive consensus among scholars that this gospel was the major source used by the authors of Matthew and Luke. If it was also the indirect source for John's Gospel as well, as some scholars believe, then Mark ...


5

Disagreement about the date for Easter goes back to the very earliest years of Christianity. Pope Anicetus and Polycarp are said to have disagreed about the correct date, as early as the middle of the second century, both finally agreeing that they could not convince each other to change. Irenaeus, bishop of Lyons in what is now France, mentioned this in a ...


5

The Wikipedia article you link to actually gives a clear explanation: quoting from the Roman Calendar, "so that it would harmonize better with the Gospel story." From 1389, when the feast was first made universal in the Western Church, until 1969 when the most recent edit was made to the Roman Calendar, the feast was held on July 2. This is exactly ...


5

Protestants have not used the same date for Easter as Catholics for every year since 1518. They did until 1582, but in 1583 the Pope introduced the Gregorian Calendar. From then on Protestants generally calculated Easter in the traditional way, using the Julian Calendar, still used in most Orthodox churches. The original principle related Easter to the Full ...


4

Paul writes in Romans 14:5-8: 5 One person considers one day more sacred than another; another considers every day alike. Each of them should be fully convinced in their own mind. 6 Whoever regards one day as special does so to the Lord. Whoever eats meat does so to the Lord, for they give thanks to God; and whoever abstains does so to the Lord and gives ...


4

Typically, yes, most denominations how special services on Christmas eve, and some, possibly, on Christmas day. (More details coming.) In Catholic Churches, there is the Midnight Mass. There's also Christmas Vespers for several denominations including the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, and Anglican Churches. The LDS Church has some unique ...


4

They're not kept full all year long, there is a blessing concerning Holy Water that takes place solely during the Triduum. But that is not the water kept in the font. There is a fairly erroneous Catholic tradition that some priests take part in where they dump all the Holy Water before Lent starts then fill them back up when Easter comes around. What we ...


4

Writing in The Mystery Of The Last Supper, Professor Sir Colin Humphreys, a scientist at the University of Cambridge, proposes a new solution, based on a combination of Biblical, historical and astronomical research. He urgues that Jesus used a different calendar and crucifixion took place in the 14th of Nisan (April 3, 33 CE) of the official post-exilic ...


4

According to Zenit and the Catholic Encyclopedia, the solemn rite originated no later than the late fourth century, with the current text of the Exultet likely dating back to the fifth century. The earliest extant manuscript is found in the Bobbio Missal, dating from the seventh century. Its author is unknown.


4

The Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity says: The Exultet’s origin is uncertain, but it is clear that it was inspired by Ambrose. Textual analysis shows, if not Ambrose’s hand, at least his mind. [...] The part of the Exultet that speaks of bees was inspired by Virgil. [...] In his letter to Praesidius, Jerome derides this praise of the bees as entirely ...


4

This custom occurs on a few of the Ionian islands such as Corfu (and Zakinthos). In Corfu it usually occurs on holy Saturday where they toss ceramic pots off their balconies into the streets. As you know the video link is mistitled. This is not the holy Saturday night/Midnite Anastasis service, this is Great Friday evening of The Epitafios Lamentation ...


4

Easter and Passover are two different celebrations. Passover celebrates the escape of the Israelites from Egypt and the sparing of them from the plague of killing the firstborn. Easter celebrates the much more significant resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. You will find these events described in all four of the Gospels in the New Testament, Matthew ...


4

Who made the decision that the autonomous Finnish Orthodox Church could celebrate Easter at the same time as Western Churches and was the Ecumenical Patriarch involved? The decision for this extraordinary move on the part of the Orthodox Churches was primarily made by the Patriarch Tikhon of Moscow. Patriarch Tikhon granted permission for the Finnish ...


3

A plausible argument that resolves the Nissan 14/15 dispute would be one that claims: The date of the Passover in the synoptics is earlier than what is indicated in John's gospel -- which is because Jesus and His disciples were using a slightly different calendar from the Jewish authorities at the time, and it is to that slightly earlier date that Jesus ...


3

The hope we have in Jesus's resurrection is that He died for our sins, and He rose from the grave. We can go to Heaven because of this. Without Jesus, we would remain condemned in our sins. Romans explains in detail: [Rom 6:9-23 NKJV] ... knowing that Christ, having been raised from the dead, dies no more. Death no longer has dominion over Him. For [the ...


3

is the intention to add fish to the diet or to remove all other meats from the diet? The answer is "Neither". The intention is to remind you of your need for, and dependence on God. Abstaining from meat is a specific example of the teaching on Abstinence. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains the purpose of abstinence in general as follows: Inasmuch as ...


3

These three sacrifices of the Passover, Feast of unleavened bread, and the waving of the first fruit typified the death burial and resurrection of Christ and establish a timeline. At Passover on Friday the 14th of Abib, the lamb was slain. On the following day, Saturday the15th of Abib, was the first day of unleavened bread, a holy convocation. A day of rest....


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