7

There is no throne 'room' in scripture. There is the concept of a throne given to us for our understanding. Since God created all things, heavens (plural) and earth, he cannot be 'part' of that universal creation. God is Spirit. Being Spirit, he is not 'located' anywhere (in three dimensions). God is Spirit and they that worship him, must worship him in ...


7

There is no single verse declaring, "God is simple." But those who believe the doctrine believe that it is the only way to coherently hold onto all of the Bible's declarations about God. Catholicism and all the major Protestant confessions declare divine simplicity. The blog post "Is divine simplicity scriptural?" says: Simplicity is ...


4

The following is a paraphrase of "The Trinity: Divine Simplicity & the Trinity." The Trinity is not three separate people. The Trinity (tri-unity) of God is an attribute of His essence. Therefore, it is in direct alignment with Divine (God) Simplicity (His essence). When we read in the Bible of the persons of the God-Head (that is Father, Son and ...


4

There is a misunderstanding of divine simplicity here, but also an unfortunately choice of phraseology. When talking about space, divine simplicity just means that there are no subdivisions to God, not that he cannot be in many places at once. It is well-established doctrine that God can be with one group of "two or three who are gathered together" ...


3

In my experience, though it would be difficult to quantify the matter, most 'Calvinists' would repair to the Authorised Version (KJV) to respond to this question, therefore : The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance. [...


2

Formulated in precisely this way (namely, that God’s essence is identical to His attributes), probably the best source is St. Thomas Aquinas. For example, in his Summa theologiae, Ia, q. 3, a. 6, in which he asks the question, “Does God have any accidents?” Aquinas answers in the negative, and the first objection regards the Divine Attributes: [W]isdom, ...


2

First of all, I should make it clear that I am not Catholic, it's just that Thomas Aquinas' Summa Contra Gentiles is the most cogent explanation for the doctrine of divine simplicity I've seen. Yes, it is panentheism, but if you run a search for "biblical panentheism" you will find no less than 17 verses in the Bible that can be interpreted as being wholly ...


2

God cannot do everything. The Bible says God cannot lie. Numbers 23:19 King James Version (KJV) 19 God is not a man, that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent: hath he said, and shall he not do it? or hath he spoken, and shall he not make it good? Titus 1:2 King James Version (KJV) 2 In hope of eternal life, which God, that cannot ...


2

Not in the slightest. The Incarnation does not involve the assumption of contingency. The Incarnation adds nothing to the person of God the Son, only to creation (inasmuch as the human nature of Jesus is a creature). That is, the soul created for Jesus, is Jesus' soul, but in not too dissimilar a way to how creation is God's own also, created for Him. When ...


2

My favorite personal conceptualization: God gives us free will. Although it's too weak to fully effect faith in Christ, God still foresees this little movement. In this way, all who are serious enough to believe Christ (cf. Mark 9:24: "I believe, help my unbelief") will become the elect. God then moves back in time, makes me one of the elect, ...


2

It is not easy to differentiate between essense, attributes and hypostasis. With regards to simplicity in its most modest form, we can say the Triune God is a constitution of all His attributes. The totality of all the divine attributes is God's inward essence. With regards to hypostasis, Knudson (Doctrine of God) mentions: By an "hypostasis" the ...


1

Absolute Divine Simplicity: Distinctions (plurality) is a Given Aquinas returns to Divine simplicity in his answer: simplicity implies immediately that the essence of God can be identified with each Person. However, this answer is troubling in that we’ve spent many questions demonstrating the distinction between the Persons and now we seem to be saying ...


1

It's important to keep in mind that Divine Simplicity, Divine Impassibility, and Penal Substitutionary Atonement are man-made theological constructs which attempt to codify the vast depth of God's revelation, making it easier to remember and apply but not necessarily fully encompassing all of God. We have been united with the mind of Christ but we are not ...


1

"Do we have to accept that God - in his omnipotence, must be able to create the logically impossible, in order to believe in something like the trinity?" In a word, no. In the person of our Lord Jesus, God did not become man in the sense of ceasing to be God. Jesus was fully God and fully man - two natures in one person, the two natures entirely distinct. ...


1

You haven't specified any particular denomination, so I'll stick with a view that is Biblical without any later doctrinal additions. That there is "no need for the idea of the trinity", is fine. Certainly the original Apostles had no such concept. It is sufficient for Christianity that the Son and the Father exist. What the being we know as the Son did, ...


1

Divine simplicity simply means that what God is, is God. The Divine nature refers to what God is. Within the divine nature, there are different attributes and these are parts forming the "one whole fullness of deity" (Col. 2:9). But the Trinity per se is not parts of the one God but rather, the Trinity IS the one God. This is because the divine ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible